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Puritans at Play: Leisure and Recreation in Colonial New England ePub download

by Bruce C. Daniels

  • Author: Bruce C. Daniels
  • ISBN: 0333655176
  • ISBN13: 978-0333655177
  • ePub: 1157 kb | FB2: 1336 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Americas
  • Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan (1995)
  • Rating: 4.5/5
  • Votes: 389
  • Format: mbr lrf azw mbr
Puritans at Play: Leisure and Recreation in Colonial New England ePub download

Puritans At Play book. Bruce C. Daniels continues that reappraisal by examining leisure and recreation in colonial and revolutionary New England.

Puritans At Play book. He looks closely not only at what New Englanders did from 1620 to For over four centuries "puritan" has been a synonym for "dour, " "joyless, " and "repressed. In the 1930s however, historians began to reappraise the accuracy of this grim portrait.

It is rare for a book to be both erudite and amusing at the same time, and this book has succeeded. In Puritans at Play, Bruce Daniels reappraises the accuracy of this grim portrait by examining leisure and recreation in colonial and revolutionary New England. Chapters on music, dinner parties, dancing, sex, alcohol, taverns, and sports are presented in a lively style making this book as entertaining as it is illuminating.

This book is a great place for readers with little knowledge of the Puritans to dispel misconceptions, while those well-versed in colonial history can still look forward to a great read and deft handling of familiar terrain. -Carol Karlsen, Professor Emerita of History and Women's Studies, University of Michigan

In Puritans at Play (1995), Bruce Colin Daniels writes "Christmas occupied a special place in the ideological . With such an onus placed upon Christmas, non-Puritans in colonial New England made no attempt to celebrate the day. Many spent the day quietly at home.

In Puritans at Play (1995), Bruce Colin Daniels writes "Christmas occupied a special place in the ideological religious warfare of Reformation Europe. Most Anabaptists, Quakers, and Congregational and Presbyterian Puritans, he observes, regarded the day as an abomination while Anglicans, Lutherans, the Dutch Reformed, and other denominations celebrated the day as did Roman Catholics.

In Puritans at Play, Bruce Daniels reappraises the accuracy of this grim portrait by examining. This book gives alot of information about the Puritan mindset and how Puritans spent their time. It clears up alot of myths and common misconceptions about the people and the time period. I would recommend this book to anyone interested in learning more about the founders of the Massachusetts Bay and Plymouth settlements, as well as though who are seeking further understanding to what may seem confusing and mundane. Excellent book that humanizes the Puritans. com User, November 9, 2001.

For over four centuries, "Puritan" has been a synonym for dour, joyless, and repressed. Chapters on music, dinner parties, dancing, sex, alcohol, taverns, and sports are presented in a lively style that makes this book as entertaining as it is illuminating.

Bruce C. He looks closely not only at what New Englanders did from 1620 to 1790, but also at what they said about play, pleasure, and relaxation, thereby placing their deeds and words in the context of an evolving and complex social structure. Daniels's descriptions of leisure and recreational activities do justice to both the intellectual richness of the historical material and to its inherent charm.

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Puritans at Play: Leisure and Recreation in Colonial New England. New York: St. Martin's Press, 1995. Dewey D. Wallace (a1). George Washington, .

Puritans at Play: Leisure and Recreation in Colonial New England. Published online by Cambridge University Press: 28 July 2009.

Conjulhala
Bruce C. Daniels brings the Puritans to life. Rather than see them as dour, gloomy spoil-sports, Daniels
shows them to be people who enjoyed life and leisure as normal people. The book is a great antidote
to those who think that our founders were dreary, sour-pusses. Daniels teaches us that they were people
who were brave, bold and human. Read this book and you will not need to ever apologize for your Puritan
ancestors again.
Fenrikree
Remember when you found out your parents actually had, years before you knew them, a very passionate life together?

I felt somewhat the same about what Daniels told me about our staid ancestors, the Puritans....Maybe Demi Moore wasn't too far off in her rendition of THE SCARLET LETTER!
Hystana
A rare and important book to understand that puritans were not a sad believers. They enjoy their faith adn life
Kegal
I have read some of this book - it's dense and slow. But I find it useful. I have yet to get to the part of the book that I'm interested in (about dancing) but it is a slow read (not a page turner!)
bass
The popular American view of Puritans is usually something out of Hawthorne's "The Scarlet Letter." That is, a bleak, dreary group of religious fanatics who take themselves entirely too seriously. While they did take their religion very seriously (your life on earth does determine whether you will spend eternity in heaven or hell, after all; it's best not to take chances), they did have fun. Bruce Daniels does an excellent job researching the relationship between Puritans and fun: What did they do?; How much time did they spend doing it?; What DIDN'T they do that might surprise us?; Did some groups have fun one way while others had fun another way?; and the all important question for historians: Why?
Two themes run through Daniels' work: the Puritan ideal with regards to fun is that recreational activities should a) not be sinful b) give one rest so that he or she can serve the Lord more efficiently c) be productive and d) not be an end unto itself. The second theme that runs through "Puritans at Play" is that, while the first generation of Puritans in America came pretty close to this ideal, as the years went on and New England became more heterogeneous, the ideal had great influence, but was viewed more as a guideline for recreation as opposed to a matter so grave as to have long-lasting (read: eternal) implications.
In this amazingly well-researched book, Daniels analyzed how reading (the ideal recreational activity in Puritan America), music, church related activities, public gatherings (such as public hangings or military training days), dancing, eating, sex, bars, gambling, and sports (among others) fit into both the Puritan ideal and the Puritan reality.
The beauty of this book is that Daniels tackles such an all-encompasing subject with apparent ease. I feel he has accomplished the goal he mentions in his preface, to write a book suitable for both the serious scholar and the recreational historian (although my one complaint is that his first chapter made for dry, difficult reading). From Chapter Two on, Daniels introduces the reader to Puritans on their own ground, always making sure to put things in a cultural context. I would definately recommend it to fellow amateur historians.
IWantYou
Of all the groups in American history, the Puritans still have the biggest bum rap of them all. H.L. Mencken articulated this false view perfectly when he defined a Puritan as someone who laid awake at night, fretting that somebody, somewhere, was having a good time. While the Puritans did have strong beliefs over the appropriateness of certain entertainments (such as the theater, which they banned as a place of lies and the breeding ground of crime), they did believe that God intended there to be joy in life as well. One of their greatest joys was sex: so long as it was within marriage, the Puritans believed sex was necessary, wonderful, and to be practiced often. Indeed, when one man refused to have sex with his wife, he was excommunicated from the Church! Bruce Daniels' much-needed volume on leisure and recreation in colonial New England fills up a hole in our historical awareness of this intense group. I loved this book, almost as much as I loved Edmund Morgan's book, "The Puritan Family." This one is not to be missed by history buffs!
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