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Southern Horrors: Women and the Politics of Rape and Lynching ePub download

by Crystal N. Feimster

  • Author: Crystal N. Feimster
  • ISBN: 0674035623
  • ISBN13: 978-0674035621
  • ePub: 1507 kb | FB2: 1694 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Americas
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press; First Edition edition (November 23, 2009)
  • Pages: 336
  • Rating: 4.7/5
  • Votes: 808
  • Format: azw doc txt mobi
Southern Horrors: Women and the Politics of Rape and Lynching ePub download

Thoughtful and engaging, Crystal Feimster's Southern Horrors forces us to rethink women's history and the history of the American South.

Thoughtful and engaging, Crystal Feimster's Southern Horrors forces us to rethink women's history and the history of the American South. Southern Horrors, an impressive achievement, expands and deepens our understanding of the sexual and racial politics of the American South.

Southern Horrors book. Crystal Feimster breaks new ground in her story of the racial politics of the postbellum South by focusing on the volatile issue of sexual violence.

Crystal Feimster breaks new ground in her story of the racial politics of the postbellum South by focusing on the volatile .

Crystal Feimster breaks new ground in her story of the racial politics of the postbellum South by focusing on the volatile issue of sexual violence.

Darius Young writes that the lynching and the establishment of the chapter led to significant changes to the political and . Southern Horrors: Women and the Politics of Rape and Lynching, Harvard University Press, p. 159. ISBN 978-0-674-03562-1. For helping the women, see Kalin.

Darius Young writes that the lynching and the establishment of the chapter led to significant changes to the political and social structure in the South.

By Crystal N. Feimster. Published: 1 September 2010. Keywords: Southern Horrors, Lynching, Rape, politics, women, Feimster, crystal, PAGE, article. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2009. Mitchell begins her book with a bracing introduction that radically reimag-ines the relationship between scholarship on lynching and the photography of the dead that appeared in James Allen and John Littlefield's Without Sanctuary exhibition.

Southern Horrors: Women and the Politics of Rape and Lynching". CRYSTAL FEIMSTER: Right. And we get to hear her voice in Nancy’s beautiful film.

Crystal Feimster, P. Princeton University, 2000, is Assistant Professor of African American Studies and American Studies

Crystal Feimster, P. Princeton University, 2000, is Assistant Professor of African American Studies and American Studies.

Yale University, author of Southern Horrors: Women and the Politics of Rape and Lynching (2009). President Obama’s efforts on behalf of women and girls are one of the least understood or commonly overlooked aspects of his presidency. Published Jan 11, 2015. From creating the White House Council on Women and Girls, which produced the first comprehensive federal report on the status of American women in almost 50 years, to appointing two women to the Supreme Court and a strong team of women leaders to his Cabinet and White House staff, President Obama has taken concrete steps to ensure that women’s voices are heard.

Between 1880 and 1930, close to 200 women were murdered by lynch mobs in the American South. Many more were tarred and feathered, burned, whipped, or raped. In this brutal world of white supremacist politics and patriarchy, a world violently divided by race, gender, and class, black and white women defended themselves and challenged the male power brokers. Crystal Feimster breaks new ground in her story of the racial politics of the postbellum South by focusing on the volatile issue of sexual violence.

Pairing the lives of two Southern women—Ida B. Wells, who fearlessly branded lynching a white tool of political terror against southern blacks, and Rebecca Latimer Felton, who urged white men to prove their manhood by lynching black men accused of raping white women—Feimster makes visible the ways in which black and white women sought protection and political power in the New South. While Wells was black and Felton was white, both were journalists, temperance women, suffragists, and anti-rape activists. By placing their concerns at the center of southern politics, Feimster illuminates a critical and novel aspect of southern racial and sexual dynamics. Despite being on opposite sides of the lynching question, both Wells and Felton sought protection from sexual violence and political empowerment for women.

Southern Horrors provides a startling view into the Jim Crow South where the precarious and subordinate position of women linked black and white anti-rape activists together in fragile political alliances. It is a story that reveals how the complex drama of political power, race, and sex played out in the lives of Southern women.

doesnt Do You
I am currently putting together a literature review for my Graduate Thesis about women and war in American History with a focus on violence towards military women. I have found very few sources that articulate violence against women prior to the Vietnam War, especially violence towards women that are, presumably, on the same side. What is most significant about the violence that southern women suffered at the hands of northern soldiers is that these men were, supposedly, fighting to end slavery and yet they were raping enslaved women.

It is important, as another reviewer stated, that history of violence in this country, and my concern here is violence towards women, not be forgotten because the "Good ole Days" were generally only good for middle and upper class white men.

This book is well researched and well written. What most amazes me, however, is that the author paints a vivd picture of the horrors suffered not only by black women of the ninteenth and early twentieth century, but white southern women as well. The author has laid out a model that I hope to be able to follow as I get deeper ionto my research, and that is looking at history from more than one angle.
Castiel
I realize that the book is intended as a scholarly analysis of "women and the politics of rape and lynching."
But, as I was reading through, I could not help but keep coming back to thinking just how carefully one must think through when engaging in any conversation about the 'gool old days.' As the young people say: To "keep it real" even the bad must be considered when discussing the old days.

An excellent juxtaposition/comparison of the two ladies: Ida B. Wells and Rebecca Felton and their handling of the position of women (and race) in an era where the two factors were so intertwined. Such that the position of women and race could get one ("justifiably") killed. Let's not repeat such a period.
Flocton
This book is very informative
Miromice
This book describes in great detail why we all are related to one another. It is something that all white Americans should consider when addressing diversity. African Americans are not responsible for the colors inherent in African Americans, while white men are responsible. White women also should be offended by the conduct of some of their forefathers.
Mr.Death
In Southern Horrors, professor Crystal Feimster offers a rigorous and fascinating examination of rape, lynching, and the sexual politics of white supremacy in the New South. Feimster approaches her topic through several lenses, mindful of the multiple ways in which white male supremacy and the violence that enforced it shaped the lives and circumstances of white and black women alike. Feimster does not use this understanding to assert a simplistic womanly solidarity across the color line. Rather, she uses it to explore how black and white women defended their bodies and asserted their rights within this limited horizon of possibility.

In a masterful portrait of white Southern feminist Rebecca Latimer Felton, Feimster demonstrates how one brilliant tactician navigated this terrain embracing white supremacy but not necessarily Democratic orthodoxy. Using the biography of activist Ida B. Wells, Feimster shows how a fearless African American woman combined her concern for black human rights with her commitment to defending black womanhood. Both critiqued white Southern men. With Wells's and Felton's stories come a wealth of others. The women of Southern Horrors appear as lynchers as well as victims of lynchings, defenders of the practice or its most vociferous opponents. For all of them, these positions were bound up in the threats and realities of sexual violence and a limited franchise.

In a work that is frequently moving, often horrifying, and always illuminating, Feimster has given us much to ponder.
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