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The Paradise of All These Parts: A Natural History of Boston ePub download

by John Mitchell

  • Author: John Mitchell
  • ISBN: 080707148X
  • ISBN13: 978-0807071489
  • ePub: 1755 kb | FB2: 1216 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Americas
  • Publisher: Beacon Press (August 1, 2008)
  • Pages: 272
  • Rating: 4.7/5
  • Votes: 746
  • Format: lit mobi txt lrf
The Paradise of All These Parts: A Natural History of Boston ePub download

Like Vladimir Nabokov, John Hanson Mitchell is a writer with an eye for nature's curious details, rather than a naturalist who practices writing.

Like Vladimir Nabokov, John Hanson Mitchell is a writer with an eye for nature's curious details, rather than a naturalist who practices writing. His new natural history of Boston is actually more a history of naturalists, explorers, conservationists and others at play on nature's grand stage with lots of juicy subplots and a large cast of engaging eccentrics. -Christopher W. Leahy, chair of the Massachusetts Audubon Society and author of The Birdwatcher's Companion to North American Birdlife.

With this natural history in mind, Mitchell explores both ancient and new green space from Chelsea to South Boston .

With this natural history in mind, Mitchell explores both ancient and new green space from Chelsea to South Boston, including the greenway formed by the Big Dig. Endlessly readable and full of personality, The Paradise of All These Parts offers Boston visitors and residents alike a whole new perspective on one of America's oldest cities.

Print version record. A Short Walk on the Shawmut:The Place That Was Boston - Crossing Avalon: The Peopling of the Boston Basin - Forever England: A City Stripped of Hills - Ring of Green: Restoring the Shawmut - Scoundrel Spring: Decline and Fall in a Green City - The Coast Watch: Saving the Harbor. In 1614, explorer John Smith sailed into what was to become Boston Harbor and referred to the wild lands and waters around him as "the Paradise of all these parts". Endlessly readable and full of personality, The Paradise of Al. . Endlessly readable and full of personality, The Paradise of All . In 1614, explorer John Smith sailed into what was to become Boston Harbor and referred to the wild lands and waters around him as "the Paradise of all these parts. Within fifteen years, the Puritans were developing the tadpole-shaped Shawmut Peninsula, as members of the Massachusett tribe fled. Now, nearly four hundred years later, one must wonder what remains of John Smith's "Paradise.

In 1614, explorer John Smith sailed into what was to become Boston Harbor and referred to the wild lands and waters around him as "the Paradise of all these parts. Now, nearly four hundred years later, one must wonder what remains of John Smith's "Paradise

A nice survey of the natural history that underlies the city of Boston.

A nice survey of the natural history that underlies the city of Boston. Mitchell has a writing style that sweeps you along with him on his walks around the city. Biggest criticism: some of us need visuals to go along with the words. Maps of the city at different points in its history would be helpful, especially to show how landfill has been added over time. fromthecomfychair, February 11, 2016.

April 29, 2011 History. a natural history of Boston. by John Hanson Mitchell. John Hanson Mitchell. The paradise of all these parts. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Are you sure you want to remove The paradise of all these parts from your list? The paradise of all these parts. Published 2008 by Beacon Press in Beacon Press, Boston.

John Hanson Mitchell (born 1940) is an American author best known for a series of books that concentrate on a single square mile of land in eastern . The Paradise of All These Parts: A Natural History of Boston. p. 272. ISBN 0807071498.

John Hanson Mitchell (born 1940) is an American author best known for a series of books that concentrate on a single square mile of land in eastern Massachusetts known as Scratch Flat. Mitchell was born in 1940 in Englewood, New Jersey, the son of James A. Mitchell (1896 – 1967), an early civil rights activist. He left home as a teenager and studied in Europe at the Sorbonne and the University of Madrid before returning to the States. He graduated from Columbia University in 1967 with a degree in comparative literature.

The Paradise of All These Parts: A Natural History of Boston. The Last of the Bird People. Manufactured in the United States of America. An Eden of Sorts: The Natural History of My Feral Garden. Living at the End of Time. Two Years in a Tiny House. University Press of New England. Originally published in 1990 by Houghton Mifflin. For permission to reproduce any of the material in this book, contact Permissions, University Press of New England, One Court Street, Suite 250, Lebanon NH 03766; or visit ww. pne.

May be you will be interested in other books by John Mitchell: The Paradise of All These Parts: A.

May be you will be interested in other books by John Mitchell: The Paradise of All These Parts: A Natural History of Boston by John Mitchell. newSpecify the genre of the book on their own. Author: John Mitchell. Title: The Paradise of All These Parts: A Natural History of Boston. Help us to make General-Ebooks better! Genres.

In 1614, explorer John Smith sailed into what was to become Boston Harbor and referred to the wild lands and waters around him as "the Paradise of all these parts." Within fifteen years, the Puritans were developing the tadpoleshaped Shawmut Peninsula, as members of the Massachusett tribe fled. Now, nearly four hundred years later, one must wonder what remains of John Smith's "Paradise." Equipped with wit, intellect, and an innate curiosity about people and places, John Hanson Mitchell strolls through Boston's streets, chronicling the nonhuman inhabitants and surprisingly diverse plant life, as well as the eccentric characters he meets at various turns. Using his modern observations as a starting point, he tells the fascinating stories of the tribal leaders, naturalists, community activists, and organizations who worked to preserve nature in the city over generations, from the Victory Gardens of the Fenway to the expansive woods of Franklin Park.But much of the history is in the land itself. As he battles traffic on notorious Route 128, Mitchell considers the ancient origins of the rocks that line the highway and those that form the city's foundation. A walk across Boston Common calls to mind the Tremount Hills, flattened by seventeenthcentury newcomers; only Beacon Hill remains. A stroll through the Back Bay allows Mitchell to imagine the Charles River, so polluted by sewage that it became a public nuisance and was partially covered over with a massive nineteenthcentury landfill. With this natural history in mind, Mitchell explores both ancient and new green space from Chelsea to South Boston, including the greenway formed by the Big Dig. Endlessly readable and full of personality, The Paradise of All These Parts offers Boston visitors and residents alike a whole new perspective on one of America's oldest cities.
Shalinrad
I dream of books that will explain to me the specific geology and natural history of the Boston area and other places I know well, and this book comes as close to doing this as any book I know. Unfortunately the geology remains a bit vague, with handwaving about volcanoes and the ice age, and the natural history is presented as a descent from a pristine paradise to a modern disaster of roads and buildings and *people*. He much prefers birds, and clearly despises cars, although he drives a clunker. I find Boston to be a beautiful city, where people have cared to preserve and restore a considerable portion of the land as open. But it seems it could never be enough, or pure enough, for the author. It was great to learn about some parks that are new to me in East Boston and near Franklin Park to explore. But I found his constant harping on the development of Boston into a city as a terrible thing depressing. Much of the history was of great interest, and with that huge caveat I recommend the book to everyone who loves Boston and is curious about how the city developed. But I can't believe there's no index or bibliography!
Zetadda
This is a very engaging story. John Hansen Mitchell takes us on the most interesting walk triggering imagination along with factual natural history dispersed with the nation's history. What lies beneath the cacophony of any city makes its evolution so much more intriguing and the fact that Boston is explored this way gives a unique opportunity to really know the city I took for granted when growing up there. If my early education included some of this offering, would have enjoyed learning that much more. The approach and subtlety of style invites the reader to walk with the author as if a wise grandfather speaking of wisdom without preaching. Being engaged with this book we can know more of where we have been and maybe have more clarity about where we may be going.
Low_Skill_But_Happy_Deagle
interesting and not too long
Black_Hawk_Down
This is the second book by this author that I have read. It was everthing I expected. I had also read Walking Towards Walden.
Delari
As the title suggests, Mitchell's book traces the natural history of the Shawmut Peninsula, better known today as downtown Boston and hardly recognizable as such a distinctive landform. In his singular "walkabout" style, Mitchell walks and drives around the metropolis, leading us through its geologic origins and survival of the ice ages to the eventual arrival of various animal species. Anyone who looks at Boston today will be amused at comparing the contemporary scene to its volcanic beginnings or as a playground for roaming woolly mammoths. (Whether or not the place was wilder back then, than it is today, is a matter of opinion.)

Among the new residents was the "bipedal primate" who had made its way across the North American continent from its ur-home in Siberia. Of course, that animal's presence gradually altered much about the land, even as the creature itself changed in appearance and nationality. The familiar story proceeds from those natives to British colonists and a wide assortment of immigrants. The nineteenth and twentieth centuries brought new ideas and requirements to Boston residents; and the city became a home for both land preservationists/reformers and city planners/developers. Thus began a push-me-pull-you relationship of tearing down, building up, and saving green. That trend continues today.

Mitchell is an expert at reading clues in the landscape and interpreting the printed histories. He also shows no fear by daring to chat with the locals he meets along his semi-circular journey. He puts so much of himself into the writing that each chapter is a subtle memoir as well. The bottom line is that some form of Nature continues on the landscape, no matter how much concrete is poured and no matter how many highways and high-rises are added. "Nature is life," reads the inscription Mitchell finds on a granite boulder in a park in East Boston. Indeed, it is so.

Readers who enjoy John Hanson Mitchell's books and this kind of scrutiny of an urban setting may also appreciate John Tallmadge's "The Cincinnati Arch: Learning from Nature in the City" and Marie Winn's "Red-Tails in Love: A Wildlife Drama in Central Park." A longer geologic road trip can be taken with John McPhee in "In Suspect Terrain."
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