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The United States and Somoza, 1933-1956: A Revisionist Look ePub download

by Paul Coe Clarke

  • Author: Paul Coe Clarke
  • ISBN: 0275943348
  • ISBN13: 978-0275943349
  • ePub: 1815 kb | FB2: 1980 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Americas
  • Publisher: Praeger (September 17, 1992)
  • Pages: 239
  • Rating: 4.9/5
  • Votes: 105
  • Format: lrf txt mobi lrf
The United States and Somoza, 1933-1956: A Revisionist Look ePub download

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. The first in-depth look at . relations with the founder of the Somoza family dynasty in Nicaragua, Clark's book breaks new ground in diplomatic history.

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The United States and Somoza, 1933–1956. Westport, CT: Praeger. Somoza and Roosevelt. Good Neighbour Diplomacy in Nicaragua, 1933–1945. Oxford: Oxford University Press. CrossRefGoogle Scholar. Puppet Dictator in the Banana Republic? Re-examining Honduran-American Relations in the Era of Tiburcio Carías Andino, 1933–1938. Diplomacy & Statecraft 25 (4): 613–629. Close Neighbors Distant Friends: United States-Central American Relations. New York: Greenwood Press.

Clark, Paul Coe. The United States and Somoza, 1933–1956: A Revisionist Look. Westport, CT: Praeger, 1992. Somoza and Roosevelt: Good Neighbor Diplomacy in Nicaragua, 1933–1945. New York: Oxford University Press, 2007. The Regime of Anastasio Somoza, 1936–1956. Encyclopedia of Latin American History and Culture. Somoza García, Anastasio (1896–1956).

The first in-depth look at .

book by Paul Coe Clark. Examines the relationship between the United States and Nicaragua during the Somoza regime. Clark argues that the United States fought for democracy in Nicaragua, but was defeated by Somoza's political skills and, later, by Cold War obsessions which overtook Latin-American policymakers.

Similar arguments are in Paul Coe Clark, The United States and Somoza, 1933–1956: A Revisionist Look (Westport, CT: Preager, 1992) chap. 2; Andrew Crawley, Somoza and Roosevelt. Good Neighbour Diplomacy in Nicaragua, 1933–1945 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007), chap

Anastasio "Tacho" Somoza García (1 February 1896 – 29 September 1956) was officially the 21st President of Nicaragua from 1 January 1937 to 1 May 1947 and from 21 May 1950 to 29 September 1956, but ruled effectively as dictator from 1936 u. .

Anastasio "Tacho" Somoza García (1 February 1896 – 29 September 1956) was officially the 21st President of Nicaragua from 1 January 1937 to 1 May 1947 and from 21 May 1950 to 29 September 1956, but ruled effectively as dictator from 1936 until his assassination. Anastasio Somoza started a dynasty that maintained absolute control over Nicaragua for 55 years.

The United States and Somoza, 1933-1956. While their book focuses on Korean Americans, it is easy to see how transnational ties have shaped the political ideology and personal lives of all new immigrants that come from the similar post-colonial, neo-colonial settings as South Korea notably Southeast Asia, Central America, and Mexico. As immigrants of color become increasingly implicated in political debates ranging from immigration policy to welfare reform, and as they begin to organize politically in the United States, Blue Dreams comes at a critical time.

The first in-depth look at U.S. relations with the founder of the Somoza family dynasty in Nicaragua, Clark's book breaks new ground in diplomatic history. Based solidly on the diplomatic record, this work takes a strong revisionist stance, arguing against the commonly accepted view that the United States created the Somoza regime and kept the first Somoza in power as a surrogate to protect U.S. interests in Central America. To the contrary, the author reveals that U.S. officials--principally foreign service officers--fought tirelessly for democracy in Nicaragua during most of the long Somoza Garcia era. Clark's work shows that throughout the 1930s and 1940s there was a consistent effort by the U.S. government to oppose dictatorship in Nicaragua, an effort not diminished until Cold War obsessions finally overtook--and eventually consumed--Washington's Latin American policymakers.

Clark demonstrates that Somoza's continuance in power was clearly due to his own political brilliance, dark as it surely was, and not to U.S. support for his regime. Somoza simply outlasted American opposition to his dictatorship. By the 1950s, the Cold War had driven Washington to embrace the most reprehensible of allies as long as they joined the anti-communist crusade. Clark's diplomatic history will be useful for scholars and students of U.S. foreign relations, U.S.-Latin American relations, and U.S. diplomacy.