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Janitors, Street Vendors, and Activists: The Lives of Mexican Immigrants in Silicon Valley ePub download

by Christian Zlolniski

  • Author: Christian Zlolniski
  • ISBN: 0520246438
  • ISBN13: 978-0520246430
  • ePub: 1474 kb | FB2: 1975 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Americas
  • Publisher: University of California Press; First edition (February 7, 2006)
  • Pages: 262
  • Rating: 4.8/5
  • Votes: 416
  • Format: docx rtf lrf docx
Janitors, Street Vendors, and Activists: The Lives of Mexican Immigrants in Silicon Valley ePub download

Zlolniski presents a nuanced analysis of the thin line between formal and informal work, how families strategize and cope with the myriad challenges wrought by poverty, and the structural limitations to human agency.

The author illustrates how Mexican immigrants have become integrated into global sys-tems of production through flexible labor regimes including subcontracting, part-time labor, and informal arrangements outside the formal market.

This excellent book by anthropologist Christian Zlolniski provides an ethnographic. Professor Zlolniski takes readers

This excellent book by anthropologist Christian Zlolniski provides an ethnographic. Professor Zlolniski takes readers. behind the luster of the New Economy to show how Mexican immigrants organize. their lives in one of the low-income neighborhoods that exist alongside the more. visible, publicized, and affluent environments associated with high-tech growth

Home Browse Books Book details, Janitors, Street Vendors, and Activists: The.

Home Browse Books Book details, Janitors, Street Vendors, and Activists: The. Janitors, Street Vendors, and Activists: The Lives of Mexican Immigrants in Silicon Valley. By Christian Zlolniski.

Christian Zlolniski is Assistant Professor in Anthropology and in the Center for Mexican American Studies at the University of Texas .

Christian Zlolniski is Assistant Professor in Anthropology and in the Center for Mexican American Studies at the University of Texas at Arlington. Zlolniski presents a nuanced analysis of the thin line between formal and informal work, how families strategize and cope with the myriad challenges wrought by poverty, and the structural limitations to human agency.

Start by marking Janitors, Street Vendors, and Activists .

Start by marking Janitors, Street Vendors, and Activists: The Lives of Mexican Immigrants in Silicon Valley as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. There are a lot of stereotypes and generalizations made about Mexican immigrants coming into the United States - Janitors, Street Vendors, and Activists is an excellent book because it gives a look into what some of their experience is actually like, and of course many of the things people think of are way off mark. I am sure that just like with any group of people, there are some Mexican immigrants who will be lazy or stupid.

Professor Zlolniski takes readers behind the luster of the New Economy to show how Mexican immigrants organize their lives in one of the low-income neighborhoods that exist alongside the more visible, publicized, and affluent environments associated with high-tech growth.

You Know You are Dating a MEXICAN Woman When. Безопасный режим: выкл.

Christian Zlolniski’s on-the-ground investigation demonstrates how global forces have incorporated these workers as an integral part of the economy through subcontracting and other flexible labor practices and explores how these labor practices have in turn affected working conditions and workers’ daily lives.

This highly accessible, engagingly written book exposes the underbelly of California’s Silicon Valley, the most successful high-technology region in the world, in a vivid ethnographic study of Mexican immigrants employed in Silicon Valley’s low-wage jobs. Christian Zlolniski’s on-the-ground investigation demonstrates how global forces have incorporated these workers as an integral part of the economy through subcontracting and other flexible labor practices and explores how these labor practices have in turn affected working conditions and workers’ daily lives. In Zlolniski’s analysis, these immigrants do not emerge merely as victims of a harsh economy; despite the obstacles they face, they are transforming labor and community politics, infusing new blood into labor unions, and challenging exclusionary notions of civic and political membership. This richly textured and complex portrait of one community opens a window onto the future of Mexican and other Latino immigrants in the new U.S. economy.