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Freedoms Given, Freedoms Won: Afro-Brazilians in Post-Abolition São Paolo and Salvador ePub download

by Kim Butler

  • Author: Kim Butler
  • ISBN: 0813525039
  • ISBN13: 978-0813525037
  • ePub: 1237 kb | FB2: 1329 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Americas
  • Publisher: Rutgers University Press (May 1, 1998)
  • Pages: 304
  • Rating: 4.6/5
  • Votes: 951
  • Format: azw docx lrf doc
Freedoms Given, Freedoms Won: Afro-Brazilians in Post-Abolition São Paolo and Salvador ePub download

Freedoms Given, Freedoms Won explores the ways Afro-Brazilians in two major cities adapted to the new conditions of life after the abolition of slavery and how they confronted limitations placed on their new freedom.

Freedoms Given, Freedoms Won explores the ways Afro-Brazilians in two major cities adapted to the new conditions of life after the abolition of slavery and how they confronted limitations placed on their new freedom. The book sets forth new ways of understanding why the abolition of slavery did not yield equitable fruits of citizenship.

Freedoms Given, Freedoms Won book. Freedoms Given, Freedoms Won: Afro-Brazilians in Post-Abolition Sao Paulo and Salvador. 0813525047 (ISBN13: 9780813525044).

Cultural divisions among Afro-Brazilians in Salvador also militated against . Citation: Aims McGuinness

Cultural divisions among Afro-Brazilians in Salvador also militated against race-based political action. Afro-Brazilian strategies of self-determination in Salvador tended to be organized not around a racial identity but rather around cultural groups or institutions within the city's population of African descendants. Not surprisingly, the FNB enjoyed little success in the city. Citation: Aims McGuinness.

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Office Phone: 212-998-8624 BOOKS FOR PURCHASE (also on reserve in library) Vivek Bald, Bengali Harlem and the Lost Histories of South Asian America (Harvard, 2012) Kim Butler, Freedoms Given, Freedoms Won: Afro-Brazilians in Post-Abolition Sã . 1971); Robert Conrad, The Destruction of Brazilian Slavery, 1850-1888 (1972); Pierre-Michel Fontaine, Race, Class, and Power in Brazil (1985); Thomas Holloway, Immigrants on the Land: Coffee and Society in São Paulo, 1886-1934 (1980); Abdias do Nascímento, Brazil: Mixture or Massacre: Essays in the Genocide of a Black People. The book sets forth new ways of understanding why the abolition of slavery did not yield equitable fruits of citizenship, not only in Brazil, but throughout the Americas and the Caribbean.

King's College, London. Published online by Cambridge University Press: 25 September 2001. Export citation Request permission.

The destruction of Brazilian slavery, 1850-1888 Library availability.

Kim D. Butler (born 1960) is an American author and historian. Butler was awarded a PhD from Johns Hopkins University in 1996. Her first book is Freedoms Given, Freedoms Won: Afro-Brazilians in Post-Abolition São Paulo and Salvador. This publication won the American Historical Association's Wesley Logan Prize and the Association of Black Women Historians' Letitia Woods Brown Prize. Currently, Butler is an associate professor of history in the Africana Studies department at Rutgers University

Freedoms Given, Freedoms Won: Afro-Brazilians in Post-Abolition Sao Paulo and Salvador by Kim D. Butler . among a population that has traditionally lacked a historic voice

among a population that has traditionally lacked a historic voice. It is a useful tool for the university classroom at both the undergraduate and graduate level and makes an important contribution to the literature on race in Latin America and the Atlantic World. Zachary R. Morgan Brown University.

Freedoms Given, Freedoms Won explores the ways Afro-Brazilians in two major cities adapted to the new conditions of life after the abolition of slavery and how they confronted limitations placed on their new freedom. The book sets forth new ways of understanding why the abolition of slavery did not yield equitable fruits of citizenship, not only in Brazil, but throughout the Americas and the Caribbean.

Afro-Brazilians in Sao Paulo and Salvador lived out their new freedom in ways that raise issues common to the entire Afro-Atlantic diaspora. In Sao Paulo, they initiated a vocal struggle for inclusion in the creation of the nation's first black civil rights organization and political party, and they appropriated a discriminatory identity that isolated blacks. In contrast, African identity prevaled over black identity in Salvador, where social protest was oriented toward protecting the right of cultural pluralism.

Of all the eras and issues studied in Afro-Brazilian history, post-abolition social and political action has been the most neglected. Butler provides many details of this period for the first time in English and supplements published sources with original oral histories, Afro-Brazilian newspapers, and new state archival documents currently being catalogued in Bahia. Freedoms Given, Freedoms Won sets the Afro-Brazilian experience in a national context as well as situating it within the Afro-Atlantic diaspora through a series of explicit parallels, particularly with Cuba and Jamaica.

Valawye
Purchased it for my bf and he couldn't stop reading it. Fast shipping. A great read for anyone interested in Afro-Latin culture.
Wafi
MUSLIM AFRICAN FOUGHT for their freedom ,before getting on the boat,on the boat, getting off the boat, on the plantation,!! on POINT AND A GREAT RESEARCH SOURCE! TOO MUCH INFORMATION about ISLAMIC/and TRADITION AFRICANS.IS GREAT AND HELPFUL in the revision of AFRICAN UNITY/RESISTANCE TO BONDAGE .THEIR is many PRIMARY SOURCES and the exploration OF JIHAD in LATIN AMERICA. the number of MUSLIM and ISLAMIC UPRISINGS for over two hundred years is a relevation! REPARATIONS NOW!!
Sadaron above the Gods
Following the dissolution of slavery in nineteenth-century Brazil, large numbers of nonwhites struggled for the fruits of freedom within a finite space. That space, dominated by a decidedly smaller but powerful white elite, dictated the parameters and definitions of the so-called "high brow" culture. Due in large part to mid-century developments in transportation (the railroad in particular), Brazil began to mature rapidly as it linked to the wider transatlantic economy. Accompanied by increasing demands on African slave imports and a newer coffee-based export economy, Brazilian elites loudly rallied around the theme of progress. For Africans and their descendants, abolition initially brought great promise, Kim Butler argues in 'Freedoms Given, Freedoms Won,' but subsequently struggled for a share of that ill-defined freedom well into the twentieth-century and beyond.

For Butler, Associate Professor of History and Chair of the Africana Studies Program at Rutgers University, the rather complicated meaning of freedom itself is at issue. Africans and Afro-Brazilians believed that the end of slavery meant fuller participation in Brazilian society at the social, cultural, economic, and political levels. Psychologically, she argues, the failure of such notions was a devastating and bitter pill to swallow for many.

Butler discovered that blacks responded largely within three strategic avenues: integrationism, alternative integrationism, or separatism. Stated briefly, in the first case blacks could culturally assimilate to the dominant strata in hopes of improved social mobility and patronage networks. Alternative integrationists in Sao Paulo, on the other hand, formed somewhat elaborate organizations such as Centro-Civico Palmares and Frente Negra Brasileira in order to gain political rights within the context of patronage ties and generally accepted cultural dictates. Significant ethnic divisions and infighting, the author argues, effectively prevented these groups from collectively organizing around racial lines in order to press for change. In contrast, separatists often withdrew from the "contact zones" of the mainstream Brazilian culture in order to achieve protection and retention of dignity within an otherwise humiliating and potentially unsafe police state.

As in the case of earlier Cuban cabildos, Brazil's candombles of the late nineteenth and early twentieth-centuries (at least initially, until their popularization) afforded alternative integrationists and separatists alike the structural ability to survive amidst complex socioeconomic and sociopolitical changes. In some cases, Afro-Brazilians consciously embraced their African cultural heritages and inadvertently "encroached" on the cultural hegemony of the white elites. In Salvador, for instance, the radical redefinition of "carnival" from the 1860s until the turn of the century represented a willingness of Afro-Brazilians to work within the existing political system. Despite efforts to coalesce around a Brazilian cultural identity, Afro-Brazilians met mounting resistance by a (white) elite-controlled police counter response. Only by the growing cross-race and cross-class popularization of previously outlawed capoeira groups did many Afro-Brazilians finally achieve increased protection under Bahian law.

At bottom, 'Freedoms Given, Freedoms Won' is concerned primarily with African agency in the Atlantic and African Diaspora worlds. In using the Diasporan Model, Butler explicitly states that Afro-Brazilians, like their Atlantic counterparts generally, were at once defined and redefined by both internal and external forces. Her account, originally a dissertation at Johns Hopkins University (1995) entitled "Identity and Self-Determination in the Post-Abolition African Diaspora," suggests that African responses to identity formation were quite varied. From a variety of peculiar contexts and factors, Sao Paulan society revolved around racial stratifications; black Salvadorans, however, found common ground culturally. In either case, Butler argues that a willingness to press for individual or collective advancement indicated a varied and startlingly active approach to carving out the "fullest" freedom possible.

Butler's account is remarkably insightful for its widely applicable framework. Given the use of an early articulation of the Diasporan Model, Butler's conclusions seem generally solid. Now over a decade old, 'Freedoms Given, Freedoms Won' would likely be a much different work if written today. One cannot help but see its dated qualities in the age of its secondary sources and somewhat skeletal conclusions. Given the somewhat disjointed juxtaposition of Sao Paulo and Salvador, recent work would no doubt help to provide a more nuanced comparison. Overall, Butler's abundant use of contemporary newspaper accounts and organizational minutes still provides a surprisingly fresh account for its privileging of Afro-Brazilian sources over their white elite counterparts.

Note: Given the option, I'd give it 3.5 stars.
Jeyn
Dr. Bulter's book is undoubtedly for the apiring "heavyweights" of Brazilian racial politics because it assumes that the reader has a basic to moderate understanding of Brazil's history, since it deals mainly with the political aspects of two of the major slave holding states after abolition (the late 1800's and onwards). This is a great thing for those who want detail--and yes, there are visuals. You can read overviews of Brazil in the encyclopedia; this is a book that can be brought into the classroom--undergraduate and graduate alike.
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