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The H. L. Hunley: The Secret Hope of the Confederacy ePub download

by Tom Chaffin

  • Author: Tom Chaffin
  • ISBN: 0809054604
  • ISBN13: 978-0809054602
  • ePub: 1849 kb | FB2: 1982 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Americas
  • Publisher: Hill and Wang; First edition (February 16, 2010)
  • Pages: 352
  • Rating: 4.3/5
  • Votes: 428
  • Format: azw rtf txt doc
The H. L. Hunley: The Secret Hope of the Confederacy ePub download

Of the numerous books to appear in recent years, Tom Chaffin's The H. L. Hunley: The Secret Hope of the Confederacy emerges as the best.

Of the numerous books to appear in recent years, Tom Chaffin's The H. A well-written and interesting volume. Kenneth D. Williams, Civil War News. A satisfying read for Civil War buffs or naval buffs, for those who know much, or nothing, about the epic tale of the H. Hunley. The Valdosta Daily Times.

Tom Chaffin’s study is the most thorough treatment of the subject. I had a sinking feeling as I read Tom Chaffin's preface to his "The . detailed and entertaining book about early naval submersibles will inform students, scholars, and general readers. Joseph G. Dawson III, Journal of American History. From that I expected another fluffy history that would be full of conjecture, exaggeration, and writer-induced fantasy.

His books include Sea of Gray (Hill and Wang, 2006) and Pathfinder (Hill and Wang, 2002). His work has appeared in The New York Times, Harper's Magazine, Time, and other publications. He lives in Knoxville. Библиографические данные. The H. Hunley: The Secret Hope of the Confederacy. Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2010.

Tom Chaffin’s The H. Hunley is a largely competent history book. The saddest part of the story is the infighting in the state of SC as to whether spending money on the Hunley project, is "glorifying the Confederacy. The majority of the book (2/3 or so of the text) centers around the building of the Hunley and two prior submarines, along with a recounting of the various unsuccessful and one successful but ill-fated mission of the first submarine to sink an enemy ship.

Given the iron-fisted control the Confederacy exerted over the media to preserve its military secrets and a dearth of official or personal correspondence on the matter, Chaffin faced a daunting task in piecing together his history, but his hard work pays off here in a rich and lively book about visionaries, mercenaries and a technological marvel

On the evening of February 17, 1864, the Confederacy's H. Hunley sank the USS .

On the evening of February 17, 1864, the Confederacy's H. Hunley sank the USS Housatonic and became the first submarine in world history to sink an enemy ship. Not until World War I-half a century later-would a submarine again accomplish such a feat. Beyond his thorough survey of period documents relating to the submarine, Chaffin also conducted extensive interviews with Maria Jacobsen, senior archaeologist at Clemson University's Warren Lasch Conservation Center, where the Hunley is now being excavated, to complete his portrait of this technological wonder.

The H. On the evening of February 17, 1864, the Confederacy's H. But also perishing that moonlit night, vanishing beneath the cold Atlantic waters off Charleston, South Carolina, was the Hunley and her entire crew of eight

Tom Chaffin has combined evidence from both fields in his book, The H.

Tom Chaffin has combined evidence from both fields in his book, The H. In this work, Chaffin has united New Orleans, Mobile, and Charleston while discussing the construction, testing, and fates of the vessels associated with the H. Chaffin begins by discussing the evidence he consulted, presumably so that others can assess his argument and investigate his sources. Chaffin’s final two chapters cover the discovery of the H. Hunley in July 1995 by Clive Cussler, its raising in 2000, and what restoration by archaeologists has revealed about the vessel’s final hours.

Аудиокнига "The H. Hunley: The Secret Hope of the Confederacy", Tom Chaffin. Читает Barrett Whitener. Мгновенный доступ к вашим любимым книгам без обязательной ежемесячной платы. Слушайте книги через Интернет и в офлайн-режиме на устройствах Android, iOS, Chromecast, а также с помощью Google Ассистента. Скачайте Google Play Аудиокниги сегодня!

Tom Chaffin on Book TV. Tom Chaffin at the Southern Festival of Books. Chronicling this multifaceted story of the Confederacy's secret hope, Tom Chaffin has answered many of the mysteries surrounding the H. Hunley

Tom Chaffin on Book TV. With an extensive examination of primary documents, he has taken on the mythologizers, offering instead an extraordinary contribution to historical understanding.

On the evening of February 17, 1864, the Confederacy's H. L. Hunley sank the Union's formidable sloop of war the USS Housatonic and became the first submarine in world history to sink an enemy ship. But after accomplishing such a feat, the Hunley and her crew of eight also vanished beneath the cold Atlantic waters off Charleston, South Carolina. For generations, the legend of the Hunley grew as searchers prowled the harbor, looking for remains. Even after the submarine was definitively located in 1995 and recovered five years later, those legends have continued to flourish. In a tour de force of document-sleuthing and insights gleaned from the excavation of this remarkable vessel, the distinguished Civil War–era historian Tom Chaffin presents the most thorough telling of the Hunley's story possible. Of panoramic breadth, this saga begins long before the submarine was even assembled and follows the tale into the boat's final hours and through its recovery in 2000. Engaging and groundbreaking, The H. L. Hunley provides the definitive account of a fabled craft.

Sermak Light
I had a sinking feeling as I read Tom Chaffin's preface to his "The H.L. Hunley." He was explaining the lack of archival material that was available for his account of the first submarine in history to sink an enemy warship. From that I expected another fluffy history that would be full of conjecture, exaggeration, and writer-induced fantasy. It turns out that I was pleasantly surprised with a riveting and scholarly tale of enterprise and tragedy that didn't need embellishment.

The "H.L. Hunley" was actually the third submarine constructed by a group of Southern patriots who wanted to produce underwater boats that could effectively break the Federal blockade of southern ports. The first two failed, eventually sinking, before actual engagement was made with Union ships. Fortunately the crew members escaped with their lives, but the mishaps raised questions about the idea and slowed the flow of additional funds for future attempts.

The three developers of the "H.L. Hunley," and the two boats preceding her, were intrepid and strong-willed, never straying from their goal. Horace Hunley was probably the most tenacious and productive, continually pursuing financial backing and political support from a Confederate government that was always short of money. It was his single-mindedness that got his name attached to the last submarine boat manufactured by the group and the chance to command it during one of its trial voyages. It cost him his life.

The "Hunley" had its share of misfortunes during its development. Five of the eight crewmen perished when the "Hunley" sank during a trial run in August 1863, apparently from an open hatch. The boat was raised, only to sink again in October 1863 because of operational error. This time all eight crew members, including Hunley, died. The boat was raised once again, retrofitted, and sent out once more, this time for an actual encounter with the enemy.

Chaffin's book is a remarkable study of an effort, seemingly hopeless from the start, that finally achieved its objective with the sinking of the war sloop "USS Housatonic" in the frigid waters off Charleston, South Carolina, on February 17, 1864. The entire crew of eight went down with the boat when it sank, probably due to a mechanical malfunction, after the successful torpedoing. The vessel's wreckage was found in 1995 and, after long wrangling over ownership rights, was raised from the depths of Charleston's waters in 2000. Excavation was commenced and the crew members' remains were slowly found and removed, the final body being exhumed by the end of 2002.

In April 2004, a stately funeral procession was held through downtown Charleston. The remains of the eight crew members were interred in Magnolia Cemetery, joining the bodies of Hunley and his seven sailors who were buried there after they perished in the second sinking. Subsequently all of them were joined by the five crew members who died in the first sinking of the "H.L.Hunley" whose bodies were relocated from a cemetery that was displaced by urban sprawl.

Tom Chaffin does a wonderful job of accumulating the available information, assembling it into a lucid format, delving into the many details about its development, and providing a fascinating story of Civil War times not familiar to most of us. I recommend this book for those interested in Civil War history, enterprise, and human perseverance. It's engrossing, entertaining, and extremely readable.

Schuyler T Wallace
Author of TIN LIZARD TALES
Envias
Not quite my favorite book on the fascinating subject of the Hunley, but definitely belongs in the reading list of anyone with an interest in the subject. The frontispiece has some really cool diagrams of the Hunley's actual construction based on modern measurements, which differ substantially from the various models & pictures of the past. To my dismay, Chaffin debunks some of the widely accepted & romantic myths (especially the role of Queenie Bennett) surrounding the Hunley, but at the same time provides more up-to-date information than that provided in Hick's version. The two authors take a totally different approach to the subject, & their different styles & opposing attitudes provide fresh insight for any devotee. While both Chaffin & Hick's books provide maps of the Charleston area, including locations of the sinkings, their maps do not agree. Having visited Fort Sumter myself, I prefer the maps in Hicks' book. In my opinion neither author gives enough credit to the full story of how the wreck was discovered by famed nautical author Clive Cussler. Fortunately Cussler has written his own account of the discovery, which should rank alongside the works of both Hicks & Chaffin for any aficionado of the Hunley saga.
Agamaginn
The Hunley was one of the first submarines and it was developed in Mobile, AL by the Confederate States. Then loaded on a train and taken to South Carolina. Hunley invented the sub and tested it...costing him his life. Then another crew of eight men tried to make this Hunley work and destroyed a Union warship...the Hunley was damaged and sank killing its crew of eight. Recently the sub was found and is on display in SC. The crew members were finally buried with military honors recently and these were some of the bravest men I have heard of. To get in this sub that had killed its crew before...was a scary and risky adventure at best. This sub was far ahead of its time and he beginning of the modern submarines in America.
Akinozuru
By far the most in depth study of the total background of the early development of submersibles as a war weapon to be used against surface vessels. This book covers early concepts and attempts in the development of the "submarine" variously known by other labels that describe a weapon that travels beneath the waves. It does an excellent job of providing the reader with an in depth study of the men and circumstances that developed a submersible that was capable of transporting men and an explosive device that was successfully used against a Federal Blockade vessel causing both the Federal ship's destruction and the still mysterious circumstances whereby the Confederate submarine and its crew being lost at sea. It provides very interesting reading about the final relocation, recovery, and archeological investigation of the Hunley today. A must read for anyone interested in the Civil War's little known aspect of combat.
Berenn
I live in South Carolina and the Hunley is of great interest here. Book was well written, interesting to read. I like the way the author made a point of noting facts he had ( and gave reference in the back ) back-up for , but also addressed some of the legends and was very clear on noting when conclusions were being made on circumstantial evidence or items were clearly de-bunked. There was some comments on some of the character - but I never got a sense the author was "pro-South" or "pro-North" ; he seemed more - "pro-facts" and reporting on a sliver of history. Would highly recommend the book - would like to see the author update with later editions as the research on the Hunley progresses ; at this point it is a work in progress and he was limited on what he could report since the work is not complete yet.
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