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Preserving the Constitution! the Autobiography of Senator Sam J. Ervin ePub download

by Sam J. Ervin

  • Author: Sam J. Ervin
  • ISBN: 0872157814
  • ISBN13: 978-0872157811
  • ePub: 1127 kb | FB2: 1785 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Americas
  • Publisher: Lexis Pub; 1st Edition edition (October 1, 1984)
  • Pages: 436
  • Rating: 4.7/5
  • Votes: 648
  • Format: docx doc lit txt
Preserving the Constitution! the Autobiography of Senator Sam J. Ervin ePub download

Sam Ervin professed reverence for the Constitution, but his political beliefs were a curious mixture of liberal and conservative causes. For example, he opposed the enactment of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Voting Rights Act of 1965, school busing, and affirmative action

Sam Ervin professed reverence for the Constitution, but his political beliefs were a curious mixture of liberal and conservative causes. For example, he opposed the enactment of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Voting Rights Act of 1965, school busing, and affirmative action. He favored the exclusionary rule of evidence under the Fourth Amendment, however, and was opposed to the "no knock" and preventative detention anti-crime legislation supported by the Nixon Administration.

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Samuel James "Sam" Ervin Jr. (September 27, 1896 – April 23, 1985) was an American politician. A Democrat, he served as a . Senator from North Carolina from 1954 to 1974

Samuel James "Sam" Ervin Jr. Senator from North Carolina from 1954 to 1974. A native of Morganton, he liked to call himself a "country lawyer," and often told humorous stories in his Southern drawl. During his Senate career, Ervin was a legal defender of the Jim Crow laws and racial segregation, as the South's constitutional expert during the congressional debates on civil rights.

Preserving the Constitution! the Autobiography of Senator Sam J. Ervin. This book should be of interest even to people who may not care a whit about Sam Ervin, because Campbell has so skillfully shown the culture of Ervin's lifetime and how it shaped him and his generation. Dan T. Carter, University of South Carolina, author of The Politics of Rage: George Wallace, the Origins of the New Conservatism, and the Transformation of. American Politics. This is a masterful political biography. Karl E. Campbell's beautifully written biography of Senator Sam Ervin is a first-rate achievement.

Preserving the Constitution : The Autobiography of Senator Sam Ervin

Preserving the Constitution : The Autobiography of Senator Sam Ervin. In his own words and without the aid of a ghostwriter, Ervin describes his lifetime of devotion to the Constitution from his days as a prohibition era defense attorney in Burke County, North Carolina, to his Chairmanship of the Senate Watergate Committee.

Sam ervin: the book by and about him. Preserving the constitution: the autobiography o. Preserving the constitution: the autobiography of. Senator sam j. ervin, jr. By Sam J. The Michie C. Charlottesville, V. 1984. More than an autobiography, Ervin's book is part legal history, part primer on legal writing, particularly judicial prose, and al-ways a polemic. Indeed, it is not so much an autobiography as a series of exhortations urging all Americans, especially lawyers, and most espe-cially judges, to "become born-again supporters of the most precious in-strument of government the world has ever known.

Preserving the Constitution: An Autobiography of Senator Sam Ervin. With No Apologies: The Personal and Political Memoirs of United States Senator Barry M. Goldwater. Charlottesville, VA: Mitchie Co. ISBN 978-0-87215-781-1. New York: William Morrow Co. ISBN 978-0-688-03547-1.

Conservative Book of the Year Award. Gala for Western Civilization. 3901 Centerville Road Wilmington, DE 19807. Contact Us. 800-526-7022. Intercollegiate Studies Institute. Inspiring college students to discover, embrace, and advance the principles and virtues that make America free and prosperous.

Western Piedmont Community College Senator Sam J. Ervin Library and . The Wisdom of Sam Ervin. New York: Ballantine Books, 1973. Office of the Historian: history. Ervin Library and Museum. Preserving the Constitution: The Autobiography of Senator Sam J. Charlottesville: Michie C. "In Pursuit of a Press Privilege. Harvard Journal on Legislation 11 (February 1974): 233-78. "The Role of the Lawyer in America. gov Office of Art & Archives, Office of the Clerk: art.

Sam Ervin was born September 27, 1896, in Morganton, North Carolina. He summed up his long career in a 1984 book-Preserving the Constitution: The Autobiography of Senator Sam J. His ancestors, Scotch-Irish Presbyterians, fled from religious persecution to settle in the new land in 1732. Educated in public schools and blessed with an insatiable appetite for learning, Ervin earned his college degree from the University of North Carolina in 1917, enlisted in World War I, and was wounded in combat in France. Additional Biography Sources. Dabney, Dick, A good man: the life of Sam J. Ervin, Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1976.

In this autobiography, Ervin recounts his 37 years as a trial lawyer and judge, and his 20 years as a U.S. Senator. In his own words and without the aid of a ghostwriter, Ervin describes his lifetime of devotion to the Constitution from his days as a prohibition era defense attorney in Burke County , North Carolina, to his Chairmanship of the Senate Watergate Committee. A renowned Constitutional scholar, Ervin explains in his book his sometimes controversial stands through legal and historical analysis of what he calls "the most precious instruments ever devised by the mind of man."
Camper
By chairing the Senate Watergate Committee and by being instrumental in the movement to oust Richard Nixon from the White House, Sam Ervin became the darling of the liberals, but it was a late in life conversion.

Sam Ervin professed reverence for the Constitution, but his political beliefs were a curious mixture of liberal and conservative causes. For example, he opposed the enactment of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Voting Rights Act of 1965, school busing, and affirmative action. He favored the exclusionary rule of evidence under the Fourth Amendment, however, and was opposed to the "no knock" and preventative detention anti-crime legislation supported by the Nixon Administration.

In the book, Ervin declares that Brown v. Board of Education was correctly decided, but indicates that the Supreme Court ran off the track when it approved mandatory busing, racial set asides, and other forms of affirmative action. Yet, in the 1950's "courageous" Sam, brimming with integrity, was a bitter foe of Brown, and was one of the principal drafters of the Southern Manifesto, which condemned the Court and the decision. Just imagine how courageous it would have been if he had upheld Brown in the 1950's, when it mattered, and not merely in a self-flattering book written in the 1980's, when it did not.
Inerrace
Integrity and principle are the watchwords of this American. He stood tall against the abuses of the Nixon administration, and many remember his indignation at their concealment and deception. He spoke out for what he believed in his conception of American values.

When blacks and civil rights advocates were seeking voting rights and access to public facilities, he could easily have said yes. But that would have been the easy man's way out. Sam became a capable and forceful exponent of segregation and helped prevent intergration in the 1950's. While many said that we are a democracy where each person has a right to vote and blacks capably defended our country in World War II, Sam saw it differently.

While many of us know George Wallace, Herman Talmadge, and Strom Thurmond as exponents of segregation, Sam's name must be included with these leaders. If quiet in temperament, his parlimentary knowledge and participation played a vital role in southern segregation. Without Sam, blacks may have voted, gone to white schools, ate in white restauarnts, or even dated white women!

Sam's legacy as a capable segregationalist will live on his legacy, and those Carolinans who believed "niggers should know their place" were graetful for his skill and knowledge.

Sadly old Sam, ever the modest man, fails to take sufficient credit in his book for his tremendous work helping the segregationist cause. For those eager to give him his due, read Lyndon Johnson, Master of the Senate, for a good discussion of southern caucuses and anti-intergration politics in the 50's.
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