» » To Sing With Pigs Is Human: The Concept of Person in Papua New Guinea

To Sing With Pigs Is Human: The Concept of Person in Papua New Guinea ePub download

by Jane C. Goodale

  • Author: Jane C. Goodale
  • ISBN: 0295974540
  • ISBN13: 978-0295974545
  • ePub: 1628 kb | FB2: 1478 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Americas
  • Publisher: Univ of Washington Pr (August 1, 1995)
  • Pages: 269
  • Rating: 4.3/5
  • Votes: 957
  • Format: docx lit lrf txt
To Sing With Pigs Is Human: The Concept of Person in Papua New Guinea ePub download

Start by marking To Sing with Pigs Is Human: The .

Start by marking To Sing with Pigs Is Human: The Concept of Person in Papua New Guinea as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. In the course of her fieldwork with the Kaulong, who live on the island of New Britain in Papua New Guinea, Jane Goodale recognized that everything of importance to them - every event, relationship, and transaction - was rooted in their constant quest for recognition as human beings.

Goodale, Jane C. 1995 To Sing With Pigs is Human: The Concept of Person in Papua New Guinea University of Washington Press. Goodale, Jane C.

Jane C. Goodale, Bedford, M. Jane C. Goodale: To Sing with Pigs is Human: The Concept of Person in Papua New Guinea.

Página de interesados en la obra de Jane Goodale. 5 December 2010 ·. Catherine H. Berndt.

The Concept of Person in Papua New Guinea. While To Sing with Pigs will be welcomed by anthropologists and area specialists, it will appeal on a broader level to anyone interested in this still remote part of the world

The Concept of Person in Papua New Guinea. Publisher: University of Washington Press. Print ISBN: 9780295974361, 0295974362. While To Sing with Pigs will be welcomed by anthropologists and area specialists, it will appeal on a broader level to anyone interested in this still remote part of the world. Goodale's analysis of songs and their ritual context adds unusual depth to the ethnography. Fascinating field photographs and readable text prove again that anthropology can be both scholarly and lively. To Sing with Pigs Is Human The Concept of Person in Papua New Guinea by Jane C. Goodale and Publisher University of Washington Press.

oceedings{Maschio1995ToSW, title {To Sing with Pigs is Human: The Concept of Person in Papua New Guinea.

In the course of her fieldwork with the Kaulong, who live on the island of New Britain in Papua New Guinea, Jane Goodale recognized that everything of importance to them - every event, relationship, and transaction - was rooted in their constant quest for recognition as human beings. oceedings{Maschio1995ToSW, title {To Sing with Pigs is Human: The Concept of Person in Papua New Guinea. author {Thomas Maschio and Jane C. Goodale}, year {1995} }. Thomas Maschio, Jane C. Goodale.

Is Human : The Concept of Person in Papua New Guinea. in the deep forests of New Britain, an island in the vast territory of Papua New Guinea. JANE GOODALL was born in London on April 3, 1934 and grew up in Bournemouth, on the southern coast of England

To Sing with Pigs Is Human : The Concept of Person in Papua New Guinea. In the best tradition of Melanesian scholarship, Jane Goodale writes here of the Kaulong who live in the deep forests of New Britain, an island in the vast territory of Papua New Guinea. Even in the last half of the twentieth century, the Kaulong's contact with the outside world through government patrols and missionaries has been minimal. JANE GOODALL was born in London on April 3, 1934 and grew up in Bournemouth, on the southern coast of England. In 1960 she began studying chimpanzees in the wild in Gombe, Tanganyika (now Tarzania).

While To Sing with Pigs will be welcomed by anthropologists and area specialists, it will appeal on a broader level to anyone interested in this still remote part of the world. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

CITED Chowning, Ann, and Jane C. Goodale 1965 The Passimanua Census Division, West New Britain Open Electorate. To Sing with Pigs is Human: The Concept of Person in Papua New Guinea. In The Papua New Guinea Election, 1964. D. G. Bettison, C. A. Hughes, and P. W. Van de Veur, eds. Pp. 264–278. Pulling the Right Thread. In Pulling the Right Threads: The Ethnographic Life and Legacy of. Jan 2008.

Melanesia has been the research focus of some of anthropology’s legendary names. In the best tradition of Melanesian scholarship, Jane Goodale writes here of the Kaulong who live in the deep forests of New Britain, an island in the vast territory of Papua New Guinea. Even in the last half of the twentieth century, the Kaulong’s contact with the outside world through government patrols and missionaries has been minimal. Their story enhances our understanding of Melanesia and adds new and significant material to the comparison of Oceanic cultures and societies.

In the course of her fieldwork with them, Goodale recognized that everything of importance to the Kaulong--every event, every relationship, every transaction--was rooted in their constant quest for recognition as human beings. She addresses here questions central to Kaulong society: What is it that makes an individual human? How is humanity, or personhood, achieved and maintained?

In their consuming concern with their status as human beings, the Kaulong mark progress on a continuum from nonhuman (animal-like) to the most respected level of humanity--the political Big Men and Big Women. Knowledge is the key to movement along the continuum, and acquiring, displaying and defending knowledge are at the heart of social interaction. At all-night "singsings," individuals compete through song in their knowledge of people, places, and many other aspects of their forested world. The sacrifice of pigs and distribution of pork to guests completes the ceremonial display and defense of knowledge and personhood.

While To Sing with Pigs will be welcomed by anthropologists and area specialists, it will appeal on a broader level to anyone interested in this still remote part of the world. Goodale's analysis of songs and their ritual context adds unusual depth to the ethnography. Fascinating field photographs and readable text prove again that anthropology can be both scholarly and lively.