» » The Contested Homeland: A Chicano History of New Mexico

The Contested Homeland: A Chicano History of New Mexico ePub download

by Erlinda Gonzales-Berry,David MacIel

  • Author: Erlinda Gonzales-Berry,David MacIel
  • ISBN: 0826321984
  • ISBN13: 978-0826321985
  • ePub: 1680 kb | FB2: 1198 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Americas
  • Publisher: Univ of New Mexico Pr; Library edition edition (September 1, 2000)
  • Pages: 314
  • Rating: 4.9/5
  • Votes: 686
  • Format: mobi lit txt rtf
The Contested Homeland: A Chicano History of New Mexico ePub download

The Contested Homeland book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking The Contested Homeland: A Chicano History of New Mexico as Want to Read: Want to Read saving.

The Contested Homeland book. Start by marking The Contested Homeland: A Chicano History of New Mexico as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. by Erlinda Gonzáles-Berry.

David R. Maciel and Erlinda Gonzales-Berry, The Twentieth Century: Overview, in The Contested Homeland: A Chicano History of New Mexico, e. Maciel and Erlinda Gonzales-Berry, The Twentieth Century: Overview, in The Contested Homeland: A Chicano History of New Mexico, ed. Erlinda Gonzales-Berry and David R. Maciel (Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 2000), 8. oogle Scholar. 9. Educators in the 1920s enthusiastically embraced intelligence tests as a tool for determining the abilities of children.

Gonzales-Berry, Erlinda and David Maciel. Contested Homeland: a Chicano History of New Mexico. Wegner, Kyle David, "Children of Aztlán: Mexican American Popular Culture and the Post-Chicano Aesthetic" (PhD dissertation State University of New York, Buffalo, 2006). Albuquerque, NM: University of New Mexico Press, 2000. De Anda, Roberto M. Chicanas and Chicanos in Contemporary Society.

Many books deal with New Mexico's past, but the twelve original essays here reinterpret that history for the first time from a Chicano perspective

Many books deal with New Mexico's past, but the twelve original essays here reinterpret that history for the first time from a Chicano perspective. Self-determination, resistance, and cultural maintenance are the recurring themes in the lives and struggles of Nuevomexicanos from 1848 to the present.

The Contested Homeland: A Chicano History of New Mexico. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, pp. 59-82. 3. Barreto, Matt A. 2005. Latino Immigrants at the Polls: Foreign-born Voter Turnout in the 2002 Election. The Pressures of Perpetual Promise: Latinos and Politics, 1960-2003. In David Gutierrez, ed. The Columbia History of Latinos Since 1960. New York: Columbia University Press, pp. 421-465. 8. Griswold del Castillo, Richard. The Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo: A Legacy of Conflict, chapters 3 and 5, pp. 30-42 & 62-86. Page 1 of 2 2 9. Leal, David; Matt A. Barreto; Jongho Lee; and Rodolfo O. de la Garza.

Herrera, Carlos R. New Mexico Resistance to . Occupation, in Erlinda Gonzales-Berry and David R. Maciel, ed. The Contested Homeland: A Chicano History of New Mexico. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 2000

Herrera, Carlos R. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 2000. Mares, E. A. ed. Padre Martinez: New Perspectives from Taos.

She served as professor and Chair in the Department of Ethnic Studies at Oregon State University and is currently Executive Director of Casa Latinos Unidos cle Benton County.

Nancie L. González; The Spanish-Americans of New Mexico: A Heritage of Pride (1969). Hero, Rodney E. Latinos and the . Political System: Two-Tiered Pluralism.

425. x+314 pp. Notes, index. The goal of this anthology, consisting of ten essays on the history of the Nuevomexicano experience from the short Mexican period to the post-Chicano movement era of the 1960s and 1970s, is to present a Chicano perspective on the Nuevomexicano historical experience. Armando C. Alonzo, Department of History, Texas A&M Uni-versity.

SIDELIGHTS: Erlinda Gonzales-Berry told CA: "I am motivated by a desire to preserve cultural memories. I have been influenced by Latin American writers of the boom period and contemporary women of color who write fiction. I have been inspired by the resiliency of my people, the richness of my culture, especially its oral traditions.

Many books deal with New Mexico's past, but the twelve original essays here reinterpret that history for the first time from a Chicano perspective. Self-determination, resistance, and cultural maintenance are the recurring themes in the lives and struggles of Nuevomexicanos from 1848 to the present. On a more fundamental level, the clash has been over modernisation -- how the Spanish language, folk traditions, and land grants can survive as a heritage for future generations amid English, new and secular values, and real estate booms and speculation. Nuevomexicanos have confronted colonialism, ethnocentrism, and racism throughout their history. But as these essays make clear, pride in Spanish descent runs deep in New Mexico and has led to a vibrancy unmatched in any other region in the United States. Nuevomexicanos have not simply survived or endured. They have secured their influence through the highest level of education among all Chicanos in the United States, through greater political representation at the local and national level-and in both major parties-than in any other state, and through a culture that has simultaneously resisted and adapted to change.