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Baltimore in the Civil War: The Pratt Street Riot and a City Occupied (Civil War Series) ePub download

by Harry A. Ezratty

  • Author: Harry A. Ezratty
  • ISBN: 1609490037
  • ISBN13: 978-1609490034
  • ePub: 1970 kb | FB2: 1742 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Americas
  • Publisher: The History Press (September 24, 2010)
  • Pages: 128
  • Rating: 4.8/5
  • Votes: 785
  • Format: docx lrf doc azw
Baltimore in the Civil War: The Pratt Street Riot and a City Occupied (Civil War Series) ePub download

On April 19, 1861, the first blood of the Civil War was spilled in the streets of Baltimore.

On April 19, 1861, the first blood of the Civil War was spilled in the streets of Baltimore. En route to Camden Station, Union forces were confronted by angry Southern sympathizers, and at Pratt Street the crowd rushed the troops, who responded with lethal volleys. Four soldiers and twelve Baltimoreans were left dead. Marylanders unsuccessfully attempted to further cut ties with the North by sabotaging roads, bridges and telegraph lines. In response to the "Battle of Baltimore," Lincoln declared martial law and withheld habeas corpus in much of the state.

Short book that covers the Baltimore Pratt Street Riot and its aftermath. There was a riot in Baltimore in April 1861, right after the war was declared, and that was the site of the first blood shed. The book describes the riot in pretty good detail including a lot of geographical references that helped me place exactly where everything happened. The author then goes into how Lincoln handled the growing rebellion in Baltimore by suspending habeas corpus. I always thought it happened at Fort Sumter, but no one on either side was injured then.

On April 19, 1861, the first blood of the Civil War was spilled in the streets of Baltimore. Author Harry Ezratty skillfully narrates the events of that day and their impact on the rest of the war, when Baltimore became a city occupied.

The Pratt Street Riot and a City Occupied. On April 19, 1861, the first blood of the Civil War was spilled in the streets of Baltimore. Books related to Baltimore in the Civil War. Skip this list. The American Civil War: History in an Hour.

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Baltimore in the Civil War: The Pratt Street Riot and a City Occupied (Civil War Series).

Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). Baltimore in the Civil War: The Pratt Street Riot and a City Occupied (Civil War Series). Maryland in the Civil War: A House Divided.

Personal Name: Ezratty, Harry A. Publication, Distribution, et. Charleston, S. Prologue: April 19, 1861, Baltimore, Maryland Baltimore on the eve of the Pratt Street riot : April 1, 1861 A prelude to Baltimore's bloody riot : April 12, 1861, Fort Sumter, Charleston, South Carolina Trying to prevent a riot : April 15 to April 18, 1861 A plan to assassinate Lincoln The Civil War's first blood : Pratt Street, Baltimore, April 19, 1861 More violence

The American Civil War began on April 12, one week prior to the riot, with the battle of Fort Sumter. Harry Ezratty, Baltimore in the Civil War: The Pratt Street Riot and a City Occupied, Charleston, SC: The History Press, 2010. Johns Hopkins University), 1887.

The American Civil War began on April 12, one week prior to the riot, with the battle of Fort Sumter. At the time, the slave states of Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee, and Arkansas had not yet seceded from the .

On April 19, 1861, the first blood of the Civil War was spilled in the streets of Baltimore. En route to Camden Station, Union forces were confronted by angry Southern sympathizers, and at Pratt Street the crowd rushed the troops, who responded with lethal volleys. Four soldiers and twelve Baltimoreans were left dead. Marylanders unsuccessfully attempted to further cut ties with the North by sabotaging roads, bridges and telegraph lines. In response to the "Battle of Baltimore," Lincoln declared martial law and withheld habeas corpus in much of the state. Author Harry Ezratty skillfully narrates the events of that day and their impact on the rest of the war, when Baltimore became a city occupied.
Hunaya
Wonderful Read, Surprising Insight into Our Past!
Kadar
As a local this is a great little guide to walking the route from President Street Station to Camden Station. Background is thorough, accurate and not biased. Baltimore is not called mob town for no reason.
Missing in the historical context a few other riots but the argument is made.
Recommend if you are coming to town to follow the American Civil War and first casualty.
Doukasa
Much misformation surrounds the story of Maryland's Civil War, and this casually written book merely spews more fog onto the complexities of the state's story. The text suffers from misstatements about key points in the spring of 1861, such as the arrests of state legislators (one was briefly detained immediately following the riot of April 19, 1861; more were indeed arrested, but not until September that year, when any secession threat had evaporated) and Lincoln's suspension of the writ of habeas corpus (he did suspend it on April 27, but the suspension was restricted to railway lines and not, as stated on page 70, "in Baltimore and parts of Maryland, covering Annapolis").

The President did later suspend the writ throughout Maryland and the nation, but the author overlooks nuance of timing here; Lincoln specifically ordered that the Maryland legislature that met from April 26 to May 13 do so with no interference from the authorities. The arrest of Baltimore Police Chief George Kane, justifiably suspected of harboring southern sympathies, occurred on June 27 and not on April 27, as the book claims on page 95. The dates of arrests in Maryland--and close to a third nationally in 1861 were in Maryland--are significant, for during that tumultuous Maryland spring, the state was left largely alone by the federal authorities.(Yes, Benjamin Butler marched into Baltimore during the night of May 13, but did so without authorization and was subsequently relieved of command by a furious President Lincoln and General-in-Chief Scott.)

This book recycles the old bromide favored by pro-southern writers, that Lincoln unleashed martial law in Maryland--he did not, for civilian courts operated and curfews were not imposed. The author makes much hay over the judicial hearing held in Baltimore by Justice Roger B. Taney to adjudicate the challenge to the suspension of habeas corpus in the case of ex parte Merryman, stating erroneously that Taney's decision challenging Lincoln's act was a "Supreme Court decision." It was not, for Taney, though a Supreme Court Justice, was acting in his capacity as a judge of the federal circuit court, to which the habeas petition was made. This work is devoid of scholarly nuance; the author repeatedly mentions habeas corpus (including a chapter on its history that appears haphazardly near the end of the book), and yet offers no context for Lincoln's actions--that Congress, being out of session, would have taken weeks to assemble and consider suspending the writ; and that Congress later by statute supported Lincoln's doing so, given the urgency of the brewing rebellion against the government.

Though the list of sources includes some original documents, along with current newspaper articles, the lack of references underscores the poor scholarship of this work. There is no index. A host of credible sources tell the story of 1861 in Maryland thoroughly, including Evitts: A Matter of Allegiances, Baker: The Politics of Continuity, Fields: Slavery and Freedom on the Middle Ground, and Mitchell: Maryland Voices of the Civil War (full disclosure; I am its author). This one does not.
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