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Lee and His Generals in War and Memory ePub download

by Gary W. Gallagher

  • Author: Gary W. Gallagher
  • ISBN: 0807122866
  • ISBN13: 978-0807122860
  • ePub: 1232 kb | FB2: 1488 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Americas
  • Publisher: Louisiana State Univ Pr; 1st Edition edition (September 1, 1998)
  • Pages: 298
  • Rating: 4.1/5
  • Votes: 966
  • Format: rtf lit txt docx
Lee and His Generals in War and Memory ePub download

Gary W. Gallagher is an American historian who specializes in American Military History, the Civil War and Civil War Memory.

Gary W. A graduate of the University of Texas at Austin, he is currently the John L. Nau III Professor in the History of the American Civil War at the University of Virginia. Becoming Confederates: Paths to a New National Loyalty. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 2013.

In this collection, Civil War historian Gary W. Gallagher examines Robert E. .To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate. Lee, his principal subordinates, the treatment they have received in the literature on Confederate military history, and the continuing influence of Lost Cause arguments in the ry United States. Historical images of Lee and his lieutenants were shaped to a remarkable degree by the reminiscences and other writings of ex-Confederates who formulated what became known as the Lost Cause interpretation of the conflict.

Lee and His Generals in War and Memory. In these essays Gary Gallagher once again demonstrates the mastery of sources, elegance of style, and lucidity of explanation and interpretation that have made him the foremost historian of the Army of Northern Virginia

Lee and His Generals in War and Memory. In these essays Gary Gallagher once again demonstrates the mastery of sources, elegance of style, and lucidity of explanation and interpretation that have made him the foremost historian of the Army of Northern Virginia. The reasons for the morale and esprit that made this army such a feared fighting force are set forth more clearly here than anywhere else. James M. McPherson, Princeton University.

Professor Gary Gallagher is a rarity among writers on the Civil War in his ability to appeal to both scholarly and lay audiences.

The essays are both challenging and thought provoking. In addition to his examination of Lee, Gallagher also provides excellent articles on Longstreet, LaSalle Corbell Pickett, Stonewall Jackson and the importance and the influence of Ken Burns's work on the Civil War. This is not a book for the so called "history buff. Professor Gary Gallagher is a rarity among writers on the Civil War in his ability to appeal to both scholarly and lay audiences. Lee, hi.The first section of Professor Gallagher's book consist of four essays on Lee which both explain the high regard in which he was held in the South while acknowledging mistakes and shortcomings. There is an introductory essay, "Lee and the Southern People" followed by essays on the Seven Days Battles against McClellan, Lee's actions on the second day of Gettysburg, and Lee's role in the Wilderness campaign of May, 1864.

Lee and His Generals. Gary Gallagher is well known as one of the most prolific and productive military historians of the Confederate military experience. While such collections often lack thematic unity, this is not the case here. Nearly all of these essays in one way or another are a tempered response to the breakup of the Lost Cause interpretation of Confederate military history.

Lee, Robert E. 1807-1870 - Military leadership, Confederate States of America. Army of Northern Virginia - History, Generals - Confederate States of America - History, United States - History - Civil War, 1861-1865 - Campaigns. Louisiana State University Press. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Tracey Gutierres on August 2, 2013. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

This book can be found in: History Regional & national history Americas Biography & True Stories Historical, political & military . Please provide me with your latest book news, views and details of Waterstones’ special offers.

This book can be found in: History Regional & national history Americas Biography & True Stories Historical, political & military biographies History Historical periods Modern history: 1700 to 1900. Lee and His Generals in War and Memory (Paperback). Gary W. Gallagher (author). Paperback 320 Pages, Published: 01/03/2004.

A timely reexamination of the career of Robert E. Lee and his relations with his subordinates includes a study of Lost Cause interpretations of the war that argue that Lee and Stonewall Jackson were flawless warriors hurt by inept generals. UP.
Tisicai
Much has been written about the Civil War and, unfortunately, much of what has been written is of dubious quality. Fortunately, Gary Gallagher continues to produce works of outstanding scholarship. Lee and His Generals consists of 13 well written and well researched articles that not only ask the right questions, but also provide sound answers to these questions. The essays are both challenging and thought provoking. In addition to his examination of Lee, Gallagher also provides excellent articles on Longstreet, LaSalle Corbell Pickett, Stonewall Jackson and the importance and the influence of Ken Burns's work on the Civil War.
This is not a book for the so called "history buff." Gallagher is one of the country's finest Civil War historians and this book is for serious students of the Civil War.
BlackBerry
Excellent book...inner working relationship between the Commanding General and his subordinates...addresses allot of questions I had....expertly researched..most enjoyable..
Efmprof
Informative and easy to read by a leading civil war author.
Minha
Great Product!
Anarus
Good, not great
Landarn
Excellent book on Lee and his generals. Covers Lee's unique hands off style and his relationships with his senior staff with mini biographies. The best part of the book is how Lee deals with adversity particularly after Longstreet is shot down in the Wilderness, Ewell is relieved at Spotsylvania and Hill becomes bed ridden. Lee has to rise above it all and pick interim successors in a time of crisis with Grant bearing down. Lee has to make crucial personal decisions with limited experienced staff and take a greater role. One of Gallagher's best books.
Kamuro
Gary Gallagher is a virtual one man industry of Civil War history, although at times I worry that he is spreading himself a bit thin and in danger of repeating himself. While I at first thought that this was a collection of essays by others that he edited, it is actually a collection of his own essays. One benefit of that fact is that this work offers the reader a chance to see the breadth and depth of this knowledge about this conflict and particularly about its most famous figure - Robert E. Lee. It also offers the opportunity to see beyond the marble man Lee to the real historical man and military leader.

The essays are grouped under four themes - Lee, Lee's Generals, Fighting for Historical Memory, and Distant Reverberations. Within each theme, Gallagher presents essays on Lee as a commander and a leader of men in an unequal struggle; Lee's complex relationships with his key subordinates - both the good and the not so good - with emphasis upon Longstreet, Jackson, Magruder, A P Hill, Ewell, and Early; the identfication of Lee by the creators of the Lost Cause version of Southern history; and finally the legacy of Robert E. Lee and of the Civil War in the age of Ken Burns, Shelby Foote, and a broadly supported battlefield preservation movement (among other Civil War related phenomena including battles over the Confederate battle flag adn the election of Barack Obama - though Gallagher doesn't mention either of these). To my mind this is one of Gallagher's best works and a worthwhile read for anyone interested in the Civil War both as history and cultural phenomenon.
Professor Gary Gallagher is a rarity among writers on the Civil War in his ability to appeal to both scholarly and lay audiences. He shares this ability with Professor James McPherson but with few others. Unlike Professor McPherson, Gallagher's writings concentrate on the Confederate war effort. He brings an obvious sympathy and understanding for his subject without overromanticizing of glorifying it. This is also highly unusual among writers on the Civil War. His essays are informed, through, balanced, and inspiring. They are a pleasure to read.
Professor Gallaher's "Lee and his Generals in War and Memory" (1998) consists of thirteen essays, most of which have been published elsewhere. I think the unifying theme of this collection is Professor Gallagher's attempt to find a middle ground between the "Lost Cause" interpretation of the Confederate war effort and recent, critical and revisionist accounts.
The "Lost Cause" school sees the Southern cause as entirely noble, tends to glorify Robert E. Lee and the valor of the Confederate troops, and attributes the defeat of the Confederacy almost entirely to the Federal's overwhelmingly superior resources and numbers. The revisionist school emphasizes the origins of the Civil War in the institution of slavery, tends to be critical of Lee and his aggressive and costly (in terms of casualties) approach to battle, and emphasizes Union skill and tenacity, among other factors, in finally winning the war.
The first section of Professor Gallagher's book consist of four essays on Lee which both explain the high regard in which he was held in the South while acknowledging mistakes and shortcomings. There is an introductory essay, "Lee and the Southern People" followed by essays on the Seven Days Battles against McClellan, Lee's actions on the second day of Gettysburg, and Lee's role in the Wilderness campaign of May, 1864.
The second part of the book, "Lee's Generals" includes a discussion of Stonewall Jackson's military reputation and how it was in large part deserved but also partly the result of chance and circumstance. In this regard, the section also includes an excellent essay comparing Jackson's 1862 Shenendoah Valley campaign, which was one of Jackson's great successes, with Early's 1864 campaign, generally regarded as a disaster. Professor Gallagher offers some unusual insights. This section also includes a thoughtful essay on A.P. Hill's and Richard Ewell's controversial roles during the first day of Gettysburg, as well as essays on Longstreet and John Magruder.
The third section of this book covers the history of Southern interpretations of the War, particularly the "Lost Cause" school of interpretation. Gallagher presents a well-balanced account of Jubal Early, whose writings became predominant in the "Lost Cause school" and a discussion of the Civil War letters frequently attributed to George Pickett -- of Pickett's charge on the third day of Gettysburg. Gallagher describes the history of these letters and concludes, in common with most scholars today, that they are in fact forgeries written by Pickett's wife.
A final section of the book offers a discussion of Ken Burns' "Civil War" series on public TV, which has much good to say about it, and Professor Gallagher's assessment of the continued importance of Civil War battlfield preservation to help educate the public about our Nation's history and about this seminal conflict.
I learned a great deal about the Civil War and about Confederate leadership from Professor Gallagher's fine collection of essays.
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