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Lincoln at Gettysburg: The Words That Remade America ePub download

by Garry Wills

  • Author: Garry Wills
  • ISBN: 0671867423
  • ISBN13: 978-0671867423
  • ePub: 1167 kb | FB2: 1589 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Americas
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster; Reprint edition (June 12, 1993)
  • Pages: 317
  • Rating: 4.5/5
  • Votes: 217
  • Format: mbr doc rtf lrf
Lincoln at Gettysburg: The Words That Remade America ePub download

The power of words has rarely been given a more compelling demonstration than in the Gettysburg Address.

The power of words has rarely been given a more compelling demonstration than in the Gettysburg Address. Lincoln was asked to memorialize the gruesome battle. Instead, he gave the whole nation "a new birth of freedom" in the space of a mere 272 words. Wills shows how Lincoln came to change the world and to effect an intellectual revolution, how his words had to and did complete the work of the guns, and how Lincoln wove a spell that has not yet been broken.

These remarks-272 words-became known as the Gettysburg Address, which I had to memorize . Millions have read Lincoln's Gettysburg Address, but relatively few have understood the vast implications or this brief speech.

These remarks-272 words-became known as the Gettysburg Address, which I had to memorize and recite before my classmates when I was thirteen. In Lincoln at Gettysburg: The Words That Remade America, Gary Wills analyzes these brief remarks and clears up several misconceptions about Lincoln’s role and intentions at the Gettysburg ceremony, where he was always meant to play second fiddle. Wills explains in crisp detail the many facets of what Lincoln said that day.

Lincoln at Gettysburg: The Words That Remade America written by Garry Wills and published by Simon & Schuster in 1992, won the 1993 Pulitzer Prize for General Non-Fiction and the 1992 National Book Critics Circle Award for Criticism

Lincoln at Gettysburg: The Words That Remade America written by Garry Wills and published by Simon & Schuster in 1992, won the 1993 Pulitzer Prize for General Non-Fiction and the 1992 National Book Critics Circle Award for Criticism. The book uses Lincoln's notably short speech at Gettysburg to examine his rhetoric overall.

Lincoln at Gettysburg: The Words that Remade America. Lincoln at Gettysburg - Garry Wills

Lincoln at Gettysburg: The Words that Remade America. Lincoln at Gettysburg - Garry Wills. Praise for lincoln at gettysburg: With 272 words, Lincoln changed the effective meaning of the Constitution, introduced a new style of public rhetoric, and inspired Garry Wills to a uniquely thorough and fascinating analysis of the text and context. It is refreshing to see Garry Wills sally forth boldly in Lincoln at Gettysburg to give readers a ‘great man, great moment’ view of history, with a vengeance. He is true to Lincoln and his ag. .

Lincoln at Gettysburg combines the same extraordinary quality of observation that defines Wills's previous best-selling portraits of modern presidents, such as Reagan's America and Nixon Agonistes, with the iconoclastic scholarship of his studies of our founding documents, such as Inventing.

Lincoln at Gettysburg combines the same extraordinary quality of observation that defines Wills's previous best-selling portraits of modern presidents, such as Reagan's America and Nixon Agonistes, with the iconoclastic scholarship of his studies of our founding documents, such as Inventing America. By examining both the Address and Lincoln in their historical moment and cultural frame, Wills breathes new life into words we thought we knew and reveals much about a President so mythologized but often misunderstood.

Lincoln at Gettysburg book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Lincoln at Gettysburg: The Words That Remade America as Want to Read: Want to Read saving. Start by marking Lincoln at Gettysburg: The Words That Remade America as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Touchstone Books, 1993. Wilson, Douglas L. Lincoln's Sword: The Presidency and the Power of Words. Alfred A. Knopf, 2006.

Wills’s book Lincoln at Gettysburg, from which the essay was adapted, won the Pulitzer Prize in 1993. IN THE AFTERMATH of the Battle of Gettysburg, both sides, leaving fifty thousand dead or wounded or missing behind them, had reason to maintain a large pattern of pretense-Lee pretending that he was not taking back to the South a broken cause, Meade that he would not let the broken pieces fall through his fingers. It would have been hard to predict that Gettysburg, out of all this muddle, these missed chances, all the senseless deaths, would become a symbol of national purpose, pride, and ideals.

Diana Schaub on Lincoln's Political Thought: The Lyceum Address and The Gettysburg Address - Продолжительность: 1.Conversations With History: Garry Wills - Продолжительность: 57:20 University of California Television (UCTV) Recommended for you. 57:20.

Diana Schaub on Lincoln's Political Thought: The Lyceum Address and The Gettysburg Address - Продолжительность: 1:23:07 Conversations with Bill Kristol Recommended for you. 1:23:07. Лучшие номера с Романом Постоваловым. the early 1900's - Продолжительность: 52:54 t bro Recommended for you.

A former professor of Greek at Yale University, Wills painstakingly deconstructs Lincoln's Gettysburg Address and discovers heavy influence from the early Greeks. 272: Number of Words That Redefined America. com User, January 24, 2001

A former professor of Greek at Yale University, Wills painstakingly deconstructs Lincoln's Gettysburg Address and discovers heavy influence from the early Greeks. com User, January 24, 2001. The 272 of President Lincoln's Gettysburg Address are as significant today as they were six score and seventeen years ago. Garry Wills' explicates them and paints a picture that gives us the historical context of the President's speech. It was short enough for generations of people to remember, yet at the same time, long enough to have a great impact on the ways we think of America.

The power of words has rarely been given a more compelling demonstration than in the Gettysburg Address. Lincoln was asked to memorialize the gruesome battle. Instead, he gave the whole nation "a new birth of freedom" in the space of a mere 272 words. His entire life and previous training, and his deep political experience went into this, his revolutionary masterpiece. By examining both the address and Lincoln in their historical moment and cultural frame, Wills breathes new life into words we thought we knew, and reveals much about a president so mythologized but often misunderstood. Wills shows how Lincoln came to change the world and to effect an intellectual revolution, how his words had to and did complete the work of the guns, and how Lincoln wove a spell that has not yet been broken.
Ttexav
On November 19th, 1863, Lincoln delivered “dedicatory remarks” at a service commemorating the recent battle of Gettysburg. These remarks—272 words—became known as the Gettysburg Address, which I had to memorize and recite before my classmates when I was thirteen. In “Lincoln at Gettysburg: The Words That Remade America”, Gary Wills analyzes these brief remarks and clears up several misconceptions about Lincoln’s role and intentions at the Gettysburg ceremony, where he was always meant to play second fiddle. Starring in this ceremony—a “purgative” and a “large scale solemn act of oratory, a kind of performance art with great power over audiences in the middle of the nineteenth century”—was Edward Everett, a former governor of Massachusetts and president of Harvard, who was both the Ken Burns and Demosthenes of his day.

In LaG, Wills does offer his opinions on several historical controversies that have long dogged Lincoln’s address. He tells the reader, for example, where he thinks Lincoln stood as he delivered his remarks. And he establishes the provenance of several copies of this address—those possessed by Nicolay, Hay, Everett, Bancroft, and Bliss—in order to clarify what wording Lincoln actually used as he spoke. Furthermore, he does provide Everett’s full speech (more than two hours of Hellenistic reference and Gettysburg battle reportage) and funeral orations by Pericles and Gorgias. These are in the book’s appendix and worth scanning, since they do establish context and precedent for Lincoln’s elegance, messaging, and brevity.

Nonetheless, the highpoints of this rewarding book for this reader examine: 1) what Lincoln meant to accomplish in his remarks; and 2) the intellectual influence of transcendentalism on Lincoln’s intellectual assumptions. Here:

o Intentions: According to Wills, Lincoln considered the constitution a document of imperfect political compromise. In contrast, he believed the Declaration of Independence represented the best statement of the American mission—namely, that all men are created equal. In the Gettysburg Address, what Lincoln accomplished is to take this mission—equality—and position it as the BIG issue implicitly addressed in the solemn event at Gettysburg and the carnage of the Civil War. In this way, he transformed the war, which to that point was largely viewed as the product of sectional disagreements and states rights, into an effort to regain first principles.

Interestingly, Wills points out that this focus on the Declaration (“four score and seven years ago” counts back to 1776) provoked immediate protest from Northern Democrats, who protested in editorials that the U.S. Constitution does not use the word equality. Regardless, Lincoln, through his eloquence, did reformulate the mission of the war. Writes Wills: “They walked off, from those curving graves on the hillside, under a changed sky, into a different America. Lincoln had revolutionized the Revolution, giving people a new past to live with that would change their future indefinitely.”

o Transcendentalist influence: Lincoln, sui generis to be sure, was also a 19th century man and influenced by the intellectual currents of his time. These included Transcendentalism, which attempted to discern and feel ideal forms embedded within experienced reality. This disposed Lincoln to favor the Declaration, where he believed America’s political ideals are stated. And this made him view the constitution—which does not mention slavery—as an imperfect political document that, with luck, would move, over time, closer to our founding ideals.

There’s more of interest in this book. This includes Wills’s discussion of Daniel Webster, who profoundly affected Lincoln’s thinking on the Union; and Wills’s comments about the rural cemetery movement. He observes: “The dedication of Gettysburg must, therefore, be seen in its cultural context, as part of the nineteenth century’s fascination with death in general and cemeteries in particular. “

Honor the 150th Anniversary.

Highly recommended.
Bulace
This is the best book about President Lincoln's greatest and shortest statement. It won the Pulitzer Prize. The significance of the Civil War in American history is sometimes lost in all the writing about the war itself. The Declaration of Independence declared all men created by God were equal, but the Constitution contained provisions which contradicted that bold statement and allowed for slavery in the states that wanted it and required the return of fugitive slaves from free states. Lincoln declared what had happened by the war to preserve the Union was A NEW BIRTH OF FREEDOM, the promise of the Declaration had been redeemed for all Americans. His words to "us the living" were that it was each generation's responsibility to renew the fight for freedom so that "government of the people, by the people, for the people shall not perish from the earth." Elites and those in power are always seeking more power and more control and freedoms correspondingly shrink. For example, as the government takes control of health care away from the people, our freedom to choose our doctors and hospitals vanish.
Jorad
Millions have read Lincoln's Gettysburg Address, but relatively few have understood the vast implications or this brief speech. Wills explains in crisp detail the many facets of what Lincoln said that day. He makes it clear that Lincoln's prescient vision is still relevant today. The Gettysburg themes comprised the first third of President Obama's second inaugural address. In brief: It's essential to remember that four score and seven years ago from the time Lincoln was speaking was the date the Declaration of Independence was signed. It is the Declaration, not the Constitution, that is the country's foundational document. "All men are created equal," all with certain inalienable rights, is the nation's beacon. The Constitution, with its awkward finesse of slavery, was the best that could have been done at the time and was clearly meant to be improved over time. The idea is to move forward toward a more perfect union, with baby steps at times and at times steps in the wrong direction but relentlessly forward. Wills makes clear that the Supreme Court justices who insist on interpreting modern law based on the original intent of the Constitution misunderstand that the country was conceived and dedicated to the lofty principles of the Declaration. Wills has written a brilliant explanation of what America is about at its essence. Lincoln understood it to the depths of his soul. We, the people, had a little trouble understanding the fine points, but we knew that if Lincoln believed it, well...our eyes have seen the glory.
LiTTLe_NiGGa_in_THE_СribE
As someone lacking anything more than a working knowledge of the Civil War, this book was eye opening. It's thesis may seem unclear, at first. But the author succeeds in showing how Lincoln created a radical shift in the U.S identity. Before Lincoln, we believed ourselves to be the inheritors of the Roman Republic, which seems strange to us now. But during the Civil War, Lincoln sold the image of our government being the modern equivalent to the Athenian Democracy, and for 150 years, this image has stuck. Wills explains the intellectual, literary, and artistic changes that provided the fertile ground for Lincoln's accomplishment and chronicles how the contemporary love for Greek philosophy provided the template for the the Gettysburg address as a funeral oration.

Well worth the read for anyone studying the literary culture of the mid 1800's.
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