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The Great Depression: America in the 1930s ePub download

by T. H. Watkins

  • Author: T. H. Watkins
  • ISBN: 0316924547
  • ISBN13: 978-0316924542
  • ePub: 1112 kb | FB2: 1790 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Americas
  • Publisher: Little Brown & Co; 1st Paperback Ed edition (January 1, 1995)
  • Pages: 384
  • Rating: 4.9/5
  • Votes: 874
  • Format: doc lrf rtf lit
The Great Depression: America in the 1930s ePub download

The Great Depression, as Watkins shows, was a scarring experience that forever changed the United States, instilling ubiquitous fear of job loss while also creating an activist federal government inextricably involved in the everyday life of ordinary Americans.

The Great Depression, as Watkins shows, was a scarring experience that forever changed the United States, instilling ubiquitous fear of job loss while also creating an activist federal government inextricably involved in the everyday life of ordinary Americans. This type of government, he adds, is precisely what most of us want.

The Great Depression of the 1930s turned the lives of ordinary. Cole Lewis Mrs. St. Clair English 10 14 May 2017 The Great Depression The book The Great Depression by . Watkins very accurately describes one of the worst time periods in american history. It made the history come to life and expressed the importance of this time period in relation to history. I read this book because I am very interested in this time period and now very interested in the stock market and this book perfectly explained both to me.

The Great Depression of the 1930s turned the lives of ordinary Americans upside down, leaving an indelible mark .

The Great Depression of the 1930s turned the lives of ordinary Americans upside down, leaving an indelible mark on the nation's psyche. This companion volume to the public television series The Great Depression tells the story of a decade of disaster, challenge, and change. Watkins, who wrote numerous books, was best known as the author of "Righteous Pilgrim," winner of the "Los Angeles Times" Book Prize for Biography & a finalist for the National Book Award & the National Book Critics Circle Award.

Автор: Watkins T. H. Название: The Great Depression: America in the 1930& Издательство: Hachette Book Group Классификация: История Америки ISBN: 0316080438 ISBN-13(EAN): 9780316080439 ISBN: 0-316-08043-8 ISBN-13(EAN): 978-0-316-08043-9.

2010 Язык: ENG Иллюстрации: 150pp of int photos Размер: 2. 7 x 1. 6 x . 1 cm Читательская аудитория: General (us: trade) Рейтинг: Поставляется из: США Описание: America in the 1930s. Дополнительное описание

America in the 1930’s, through the stories of those who lived in the plains, describes the terrible dust bowl. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

The Great Depression: America in the 1930’s . Watkins in his book The Great Depression: America in the 1930’s, through the stories of those who lived in the plains, describes the terrible dust bowl. A woman described how the dust would come in huge quantities and at very high speeds and would be pitch. Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern.

The Great Depression: America in the 1930s by T. Watkins: Filled with photographs and historical data, this book offers amazing insight into what life was like for the average American in the 1930s. A lot can happen in a little over a century. These books trace the history of the .

The Great Depression: Causes & Repercussions - US Economic History 7 - Продолжительность: 4:56 Learn Liberty Recommended for yo.

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At the beginning of the 1930s, one-quarter of all wage-earning American workers were unemployed. In 1932, Americans elected Franklin D. Roosevelt, who, over the next nine years, implemented the New Deal and created a new role for government in American life.

The great depression. America in the 1930s. A discerning, information-packed, and emotionally charged survey of America's crucible; by the author of the National Book Award-nominated Righteous Pilgrim (1990). As might be expected from a companion volume to an upcoming PBS series, the text is episodic and copiously illustrated. By themselves, the more than one hundred photographs and their long, illuminating captions do a fine job of conveying America's dark night.

Chronicles the devastation caused by the nation's most serious economic upheaval, offering parallels with America's present economic woes
Nikobar
Great for research
Doktilar
This book very accurately portrays life in the 30's and the crucial role FDR played in ameliorating the devestating conditions of that era.Many current day commentators downplay or belittle the role that FDR played in this regard. This book corrects that misconception and sets the record straight.
Unfortunately, the photographs, though excellent and some of which I had never seen before, were of very poor quality in the paperback edition.
Clandratha
Great review of time period
Jaberini
Unfortunately, the book inserts a contemporary political view on a historic period
Breder
Fantastic book detailing the events of this unique period in American History. I bought the book to try to get insight into our current economic situation. Maybe it didn't generate any profound insights on how to manage or position myself to avoid the Great Depression expereince but a great read nonetheless.
Acebiolane
A seemingly biased view of the era.
Fek
Although rich and varied in its summary of the impact the "Great Depression" had on American culture, this continuation of the PBS documentary of the same name is broad but not very deep. As I only caught the "tail end" of the TV version of this documentary, my purpose for reading the book was to "round out" what I had missed in search of a better handle on the reasons that actually caused the "Great Depression." But unfortunately for me, on that particular issue, this book provided only limited answers. It merely "skates lightly along the surface" of the causes, in an almost polemical way: making only backhanded references to bank failures, stock market speculation, and the laxity of regulations, more generally. What I expected, but did not get, was a robust narrative or economic analysis to go with the somewhat "left-leaning" polemics.

Given our present search for solutions to the 2008 economic meltdown, and the "sea change" that Franklin Delano Roosevelt's government programs represented in altering the course of the social contract between government and the people, it did not seems unreasonable to me to expect a much more thorough analysis of the economic causes of the great depression. And while the book did not satisfy my demands on that score, it did provide something infinitely more valuable: It showed just beyond the text, that the ultimate schism in American culture is not just the one that moves along the gridline that divides us by race, but also along the deeper more philosophical issue of how the nation is to organize itself economically.

Here, both in the text, and in relief, we can see ever so clearly that it is the constant tension between what is perceived to be the "corporate good" and the "common good" that serves as the backdrop for so much of American politics and a great deal of American culture. From this photographic version of John Steinbeck's famous novel, "Grapes of Wrath," we get to see how these tensions came about; how they got played out and negotiated both through formal politics and through informal political action and pressures in the public spaces, and how they all can be vectored directly back to the major philosophical and cultural divisions in our culture: That is to say between "rugged individualism and Puritanism;" between the dwindling concept of the "common good" and the "rising emphasis on the corporate managed state;" between "socially adjusted organization man" and "socially free activist cultural man; between liberalism and conservatism, and indeed between "corporate profits" and government's responsibility for providing for the nation's welfare, or for the "common good."

That so much can be uncovered from reading between the lines of this history and abstracting from its haunting pictures, will simply leave the reader exhausted and in complete awe of how deep the psychic scars of the "great Depression," actually have been on American culture.

Four Stars
T.H. Watkins takes the reader on a fascinating journey into life in America during the late 1920's and 1930's in his book "The Great Depression-America in the 1930's".Well-researched, thoroughly written, and graced with an astounding collection of photos that truly capture the pain and desperation of America at the time, this book belongs on the bookshelf of anyone with an interest in American history, politics, and societal behavior.
Millions of Americans who had been raised on the belief that hard work, discipline, and thrift would see them through were shell shocked by their sudden fall upon hard times-due of course to events largely out of their control. As never before, suddenly the adequacy of self-sufficiency and individualism (qualities inherent in the model of the "good American") were called into question, and with the forces of international economics, politics, growing industrial unionism, racism, adverse weather conditions, and historical fate combining to produce a bitter pill to swallow, it is easy to see why the 1930's was a time for some of the most angry, chaotic, and divergent politics ever.
As one would expect, the dealings of the Hoover and FDR administrations are given much mention in this book, but so too are many other locales of political activity. From Louisiana Senator Huey Long's bellicose populist calls to "share our wealth", to the concerted efforts of Midwest farmers in intimidating foreclosing bankers, to the fears expressed by world watching Republicans and Democrats alike that America was writing its own dangerous Bolshevik script-Watkins' book drives home the idea that the politics of this era was interesting not for its own sake or for its ideological diversity, but because there was a real sense of urgency and crisis-politics really did matter.
While the author examines the Great Depression through the eyes of many different types of people, including the world's most powerful businessmen and politicians, it is the stories! coming from the poverty stricken that are the most heartbreaking. One account told the story of a teacher in dirt poor Appalachia ordering a sickly thin girl to go home and get something to eat-only to hear from the girl that she couldn't, because it was her brother's turn to eat that day.
While the book is certainly full of stories depicting the hard times of the downtrodden and the ugly injustices that they endured (and also sometimes inflicted), there are also stories about struggling Americans who steadfastly never gave up, and retained their streak of gritty self-determination-even if it meant selling apples in New York or oranges in New Orleans for a nickel a piece to make ends meet. As I read of the hardships that Americans faced during the Great Depression, and their ways for coping with the tough times, I can't help but wonder how today's instant-gratification society-with all of its consumer debt and poor saving habits-would cope under similar adverse conditions. Watkins concludes his book with a tribute to the people of the Great Depression era, remarking that "if we shape our world half as well as the men and women of the 1930's, we will have gone a long way towards honoring our own obligation to the future."
Fine words from a fine historian and author.
Erich Overhultz, B.A., M.P.A. Florida Atlantic University [email protected]
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