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Atlantic Loyalties: Americans in Spanish West Florida, 1785-1810 ePub download

by Andrew McMichael

  • Author: Andrew McMichael
  • ISBN: 082033023X
  • ISBN13: 978-0820330235
  • ePub: 1474 kb | FB2: 1470 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Americas
  • Publisher: University of Georgia Press (January 25, 2008)
  • Pages: 240
  • Rating: 4.1/5
  • Votes: 978
  • Format: lrf mbr rtf mobi
Atlantic Loyalties: Americans in Spanish West Florida, 1785-1810 ePub download

Focusing upon an obscure region the Baton Rouge district of West Florida, he has carefully chronicled the political, economic, social, and cultural factors that gave context to the lives and loyalties of the French, Spanish, British, and American settlers. What is remarkable is not that the loyalties of the Anglo-Americans shifted, but that they took so long to do so; that it took such a buildup of historical and local events for them to do so. After victory in the Revolutionary War and the Louisiana Purchase, for example, Americans rowdily and sometimes violently took over some locales.

As McMichael points out, scholars have often cast the story of West Florida’s transformation from Spanish colony to American territory by 1810 as inevitable, the logical conclusion of Anglo colonists settling in what was never more than a nominally Spanish-controlled territory. In most conventional perspectives, the supposed loyalty of this Anglo majority to Spain is barely taken seriously, and its evaporation in 1810 features as a foregone conclusion. In most of this book, however, McMichael argues that the Anglos of Baton Rouge actually preferred loyalty to the Spanish Crown over membership.

Home Browse Books Book details, Atlantic Loyalties: Americans in Spanish West. Atlantic Loyalties: Americans in Spanish West Florida, 1785-1810. McMichael focuses on the Baton Rouge district of Spanish West Florida from 1785 through 1810, analyzing why resident Anglo-Americans, who had maintained a high degree of loyalty to the Spanish Crown through 1809, rebelled in 1810.

McMichael focuses on the Baton Rouge district of Spanish West Florida from 1785 .

McMichael focuses on the Baton Rouge district of Spanish West Florida from 1785 through 1810, analyzing why resident Anglo-Americans, who had maintained a high degree of loyalty to the Spanish Crown through 1809, rebelled in 1810. In particular, Andrew McMichael looks at the colonial Spanish administration’s attitude toward resident Americans.

Atlantic Loyalties book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Atlantic Loyalties: Americans in Spanish West Florida, 1785-1810 as Want to Read: Want to Read saving. Start by marking Atlantic Loyalties: Americans in Spanish West Florida, 1785-1810 as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

In particular, Andrew McMichael looks at the colonial Spanish .

In particular, Andrew McMichael looks at the colonial Spanish administration's attitude toward resident Americans. Breaking with traditional scholarship, McMichael examines contests over land and slaves as a determinant of loyalty. An unanticipated problem manifested itself for Americans living in Spanish Louisiana and West Florida when in 1800 the bulk of Spanish holdings in the area reverted to French control.

Spanish West Florida (Spanish: Florida Occidental) was a province of the Spanish Empire from 1783 until 1821, when both it. .McMichael, Andrew (2008). Atlantic Loyalties: Americans in Spanish West Florida, 1785–1810. University of George Press. ISBN 978-0-8203-3004-4.

Spanish West Florida (Spanish: Florida Occidental) was a province of the Spanish Empire from 1783 until 1821, when both it and East Florida were ceded to the United States. Much of its territory was gradually annexed by the United States in the West Florida controversy.

Atlantic Loyalities: Americans in Spanish West Florida, 1785-1810. oceedings{cLA, title {Atlantic Loyalities: Americans in Spanish West Florida, 1785-1810}, author {Robert Michael Morrissey}, year {2012} }. Robert Michael Morrissey.

Americans in Spanish West Florida, 1785-1810. Published January 25, 2008 by University of Georgia Press.

Integrating social, cultural, economic, and political history, this is a study of the factors that grounded―or swayed―the loyalties of non-Spaniards living under Spanish rule on the southern frontier. In particular, Andrew McMichael looks at the colonial Spanish administration’s attitude toward resident Americans. The Spanish borderlands systems of slavery and land ownership, McMichael shows, used an efficient system of land distribution and government patronage that engendered loyalty and withstood a series of conflicts that tested, but did not shatter, residents’ allegiance. McMichael focuses on the Baton Rouge district of Spanish West Florida from 1785 through 1810, analyzing why resident Anglo-Americans, who had maintained a high degree of loyalty to the Spanish Crown through 1809, rebelled in 1810.

The book contextualizes the 1810 rebellion, and by extension the southern frontier, within the broader Atlantic World, showing how both local factors as well as events in Europe affected lives in the Spanish borderlands. Breaking with traditional scholarship, McMichael examines contests over land and slaves as a determinant of loyalty. He draws on Spanish, French, and Anglo records to challenge scholarship that asserts a particularly “American” loyalty on the frontier whereby Anglo-American residents in West Florida, as disaffected subjects of the Spanish Crown, patiently abided until they could overthrow an alien system. Rather, it was political, social, and cultural conflicts―not nationalist ideology―that disrupted networks by which economic prosperity was gained and thus loyalty retained.

Trash
Excellent book on American patriots and loyalists in West Florida during the post-American Revolution era. Good for advanced undergraduates and graduate students interested in the effects of the American Revolution in neighboring borderland colonies during the Early Republic period.
Kagaramar
McMichael's "Atlantic Loyalties" makes a good study of how a region became part of the United States differently from how practically all of the rest of the U. S. was formed. The jingoistic settlement of Texas preceding the Mexican War; displacement of Native American tribes; and administrative steps leading to statehood as with California and other Western states are familiar ways regions have been incorporated into the United States. By contrast, the Florida panhandle controlled by Spain became a part of the nation by a long, winding course by which the Anglo-Americas who made up the majority of the population changed loyalties.

Part of the Spanish territory of western Florida almost from the earliest days of its settlement, Anglo-Americans were not essentially dissatisfied with being subject to Spanish rule. The Anglo-Americans were economically successful; they made a community within the territory; the Spanish rule was benign, with some of the governors, notably Charles Louis Boucher de Grand Pre, popular. Neither victory in America's War of Independence nor the Louisiana Purchase turned the west Floridian Anglo-Americans' allegiance from the Spanish to the Americans. However, each of these momentous historical events inevitably contributed to the eventual change in loyalties.

Continuing United States' troubles with Britain leading to the War of 1812 and conflict among the European countries of Britain, Spain, and France with the rise of Napoleon having some global dimension also unsettled the circumstances in west Florida so as to contribute to the change. Outside American agitators trying to bring the area into the United States; Spanish land speculators; and developments in the Caribbean region were localized factors which along with the larger historical events, made the change of loyalty virtually inevitable. It was only a matter of time.

What is remarkable is not that the loyalties of the Anglo-Americans shifted, but that they took so long to do so; that it took such a buildup of historical and local events for them to do so. After victory in the Revolutionary War and the Louisiana Purchase, for example, Americans rowdily and sometimes violently took over some locales.

McMichael, associate professor of history at Western Kentucky University, does not attribute the change in allegiance from Spain to the United States to any single cause; neither to any confluence of a few. He shows how the effects of historical developments and the practicalities and feelings of human lives intermingle in certain veins of history.
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