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Red Brethren: The Brothertown and Stockbridge Indians and the Problem of Race in Early America ePub download

by David J. Silverman

  • Author: David J. Silverman
  • ISBN: 0801444772
  • ISBN13: 978-0801444777
  • ePub: 1221 kb | FB2: 1803 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Americas
  • Publisher: Cornell University Press; 1 edition (October 28, 2010)
  • Pages: 296
  • Rating: 4.2/5
  • Votes: 215
  • Format: doc docx lit txt
Red Brethren: The Brothertown and Stockbridge Indians and the Problem of Race in Early America ePub download

David J. Silverman's Red Brethren is much more than an excellent study of how indigenous Americans coped with conquest and colonization.

David J.

InRed Brethren, David J. Silverman considers the stories of these communities and argues that Indians in early America were racial thinkers in their own right and that indigenous people rallied together as Indians not only in the context of violent resistance but also in campaigns t. . Silverman considers the stories of these communities and argues that Indians in early America were racial thinkers in their own right and that indigenous people rallied together as Indians not only in the context of violent resistance but also in campaigns to adjust peacefully to white dominion. All too often, the Indians discovered that their many concessions to white demands earned them no relief. In the era of the American Revolution, the pressure of white settlements forced the Brothertowns and Stockbridges from New England to Oneida country in upstate New York.

In Red Brethren, David J. Silverman considers the stories of these communities and argues that Indians in early America were racial thinkers in their own right and that in New England Indians created the multitribal Brothertown and Stockbridge communities during the eighteenth century with the intent of using Christianity and civilized reforms to cope with white expansion.

Quantitative studies of 19th Century American religion have long been frustrated by a lack of data on religious affiliation. David R. Roediger, The Wages of Whiteness: Race and the Making of the American Working Class. In this essay we use census data on churches to reconstruct detailed membership estimates for 1850, 1860, and 1870 by means of weighted least squares equations. The results are reassuring. Silverman considers the stories of these communities and argues that Indians in early America were racial thinkers in their own right and that indigenous people rallied together as Indians not only in the context of violent. ISBN13:9781501700750.

Allowing for some latitude in using the phrase "early America" in the title of this study, it nevertheless provides a thoroughgoing and finely nuanced depiction of crucial issues between Native Americans and white settlers in an important geographical area during the eighteenth and early nineteenth.

Allowing for some latitude in using the phrase "early America" in the title of this study, it nevertheless provides a thoroughgoing and finely nuanced depiction of crucial issues between Native Americans and white settlers in an important geographical area during the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. The basic elements of the general narrative have been known for some time: Native Christians in New England and New Jersey banded together for mutual support and ethnic survival, moving from the seaboard to upstate New York and thence to Wisconsin, some even to Kansas. Silverman considers the stories of these communities and argues that Indians in early America were . Red Brethren traces the evolution of Indian ideas about race under this relentless pressure

In Red Brethren, David J. Red Brethren traces the evolution of Indian ideas about race under this relentless pressure. In the early seventeenth century, indigenous people did not conceive of themselves as Indian.

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New England Indians created the multitribal Brothertown and Stockbridge communities during the eighteenth century with the intent of using Christianity and civilized reforms to cope with white expansion. In Red Brethren, David J. Silverman considers the stories of these communities and argues that Indians in early America were racial thinkers in their own right and that indigenous people rallied together as Indians not only in the context of violent resistance but also in campaigns to adjust peacefully to white dominion. All too often, the Indians discovered that their many concessions to white demands earned them no relief.

In the era of the American Revolution, the pressure of white settlements forced the Brothertowns and Stockbridges from New England to Oneida country in upstate New York. During the early nineteenth century, whites forced these Indians from Oneida country, too, until they finally wound up in Wisconsin. Tired of moving, in the 1830s and 1840s, the Brothertowns and Stockbridges became some of the first Indians to accept U.S. citizenship, which they called "becoming white," in the hope that this status would enable them to remain as Indians in Wisconsin. Even then, whites would not leave them alone.

Red Brethren traces the evolution of Indian ideas about race under this relentless pressure. In the early seventeenth century, indigenous people did not conceive of themselves as Indian. They sharpened their sense of Indian identity as they realized that Christianity would not bridge their many differences with whites, and as they fought to keep blacks out of their communities. The stories of Brothertown and Stockbridge shed light on the dynamism of Indians' own racial history and the place of Indians in the racial history of early America.

Iell
Red Brethren covers the epic tragedy of several groups of Native Americans who adopted Christianity, yet were abused, cheated and repeatedly exiled across the growing country by their fellow Christians. The author chronicles their history across many generations and provides background on the racial and religious tensions which developed within and between the Native and White communities. In many other accounts this history is provided as a snapshot in time because of a focus on a single state's history. This book explores the repeated results with a longer, national perspective and leaves the reader with much to ponder on our country's long legacy of religious and racial strife and the amazing capacity of human resilience. I highly recommend this book for anyone interested in United States, Native American and/or Christian history.
Mora
All good. Thanks!
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