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The U.S. Supreme Court: A Very Short Introduction ePub download

by Linda Greenhouse

  • Author: Linda Greenhouse
  • ISBN: 0199754543
  • ISBN13: 978-0199754540
  • ePub: 1801 kb | FB2: 1748 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Americas
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press (March 12, 2012)
  • Pages: 144
  • Rating: 4.9/5
  • Votes: 128
  • Format: docx mbr lrf mobi
The U.S. Supreme Court: A Very Short Introduction ePub download

This is the summary of The . США целыми не выйдут, ВЫИГРАЕТ Россия": Кедми правдой вводит студию в ШОК!

This is the summary of The . Supreme Court: A Very Short Introduction by Linda Greenhouse. США целыми не выйдут, ВЫИГРАЕТ Россия": Кедми правдой вводит студию в ШОК!

For thirty years, Linda Greenhouse, the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of The . This book is the court's story. ABOUT THE SERIES: The Very Short Introductions series from Oxford University Press contains hundreds of titles in almost every subject area.

For thirty years, Linda Greenhouse, the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of The . Supreme Court: A Very Short Introduction, chronicled the activities of the justices as the Supreme Court correspondent for the New York Times. In this concise volume, she draws on her deep knowledge of the court's history as well as of its written and unwritten rules to show the reader how the Supreme Court really works.

Greenhouse Linda (EN). For 30 years, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Linda Greenhouse chronicled the activities of the . Supreme Court and its justices as a correspondent for the New York Times. In this Very Short Introduction, she draws on her deep knowledge of the courts history and of its written and unwritten rules to show readers how the Supreme Court really works

For thirty years, Linda Greenhouse, the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of The . Books related to The . Supreme Court: A Very Short Introduction. Making Our Democracy Work.

THE SUPREME COURT is part of the Oxford Very Short Introduction series that, since, 1995, has covered over 300 topics. In only 98 pages Greenhouse provides a thumb-nail sketch of the Supreme Court's history and several turning-point cases. Far more important, she describes, with exquisite examples: how the Court functions, critical issues of law, the long-term impact of public opinion, and how personal the process can become.

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Very Short Introductions. Shows the court at work by focusing on the people and traditions of the institution. For thirty years, Linda Greenhouse, the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of The . Written by Pulitzer Prize-winning New York Times Supreme Court reporter. In this concise volume, she draws on her deep knowledge of the court's history as well as of its written and unwritten rules to show the reader how the Supreme Court really works

For 30 years, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Linda Greenhouse chronicled the activities of the U.S. Supreme Court and its justices as a correspondent for the New York Times. In this Very Short Introduction, she draws on her deep knowledge of the court's history and of its written and unwritten rules to show readers how the Supreme Court really works. Greenhouse offers a fascinating institutional biography of a place and its people--men and women who exercise great power but whose names and faces are unrecognized by many Americans and whose work often appears cloaked in mystery. How do cases get to the Supreme Court? How do the justices go about deciding them? What special role does the chief justice play? What do the law clerks do? How does the court relate to the other branches of government? Greenhouse answers these questions by depicting the justices as they confront deep constitutional issues or wrestle with the meaning of confusing federal statutes. Throughout, the author examines many individual Supreme Court cases to illustrate points under discussion, ranging from Marbury v. Madison, the seminal case which established judicial review, to the recent District of Columbia v. Heller (2008), which struck down the District of Columbia's gun-control statute and which was, surprisingly, the first time in its history that the Court issued an authoritative interpretation of the Second Amendment. To add perspective, Greenhouse also compares the Court to foreign courts, revealing interesting differences. For instance, no other country in the world has chosen to bestow life tenure on its judges. A superb overview packed with telling details, this volume offers a matchless introduction to one of the pillars of American government.
Styphe
As in her New York Times essays, Linda Greenhouse does something that is really rare among journalists — she gets the subject right, does not dumb things down, and provides accessible insights into a complex issue. This short book is exactly what a basic introduction should be.
Shaktiktilar
I unreservedly recommend Greenhouse's book for distinguished jurists and lawyers, as well as for laymen interested in the Constitution and the functioning of the Supreme Court. There are marvelous nuggets of personal insight and of judicial history and analysis that would enlighten us all.

Linda Greenhouse is one of my favorite Supreme Court chroniclers of our era. Winner of the Pulitzer Prize and other distinguished awards for her NEW YORK TIMES coverage of the Supreme Court (1978 to 2007, with a two-year break in the mid-80s),Greenhouse is uncommonly well versed in the Constitution, the Supreme Court, and the judicial personalities of recent Court justices. She also displays flashes of personal opinion, especially on abortion, same-sex marriage, and a flexible application of a constitution written nearly 250 years ago

Taking early retirement from the TIMES in 2008,Greenhouse teaches at Yale Law School and writes frequent, opinionated TIMES commentary columns. The most recent, 7/10/13, was on the debilitating long-term affect of carefully crafted, compromise Court majority opinions.

THE SUPREME COURT is part of the Oxford Very Short Introduction series that, since, 1995, has covered over 300 topics. In only 98 pages Greenhouse provides a thumb-nail sketch of the Supreme Court's history and several turning-point cases. Far more important, she describes, with exquisite examples: how the Court functions, critical issues of law, the long-term impact of public opinion, and how personal the process can become. This is the inside story from a highly-respected insider. (Seven of nine sitting Supreme Court justices attended her farewell party.)

As a layman, I have included the Constitution and various Supreme Court decisions in my college American history courses for over two decades, have read many books on diverse aspects of the Supreme Court, and, on occasion, have made public presentations on the Constitution. Greenhouse's book makes me feel like a constitutional and Supreme Court neophyte. Greenhouse has drawn on her forty plus years of experience to capture the essence of the Supreme Court through pithy examples and well-grounded personal opinions.

Perhaps most surprising, in such a slim book, is the space devoted to her criticism of life-time appointments for Supreme Court justices. She highlights that this is not the practice globally in any long-established judicial system. However, she does not suggest that a constitutional amendment changing this is even a remote possibility.

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Anarawield
I wanted a small and succinct reference book and there may be a better one, but I can't imagine there is. Something I was looking for was a list of all the justices and when they served. This book has that list and it's current; including Justices Roberts and Alito. When one is reading about a certain court decision one can look at that list and see who the other justices were and what president nominated them.
Just what I was looking for.
Aradwyn
She is always terrific!
sergant
NY Times Supreme Court reporter/ author Linda Greenhouse shows her knowledge of the Supreme Court of the United States (SCOTUS) in this short book. I, apparently, read the book's first printing in which Greenhouse incorrectly described the Lynch v. Donnelly decision as a school prayer case. The actual Lynch opinion permitted placing a creche in a RI public park along with other holiday symbols. Lee v. Weisman was the junior high graduation prayer case. When I e-mailed her about this, she immediately and graciously responded to me that this mix-up had been corrected after the first printing. Kudos to her! Again, this book is worth reading for the Court's history, interaction with Congresses and Presidents, and the cases discussed.
Cells
Very instuctional!
Lyrtois
Needed this for a college class, it was much cheaper to download it on Kindle cloud then buying a paper version I will never look at again and I had it right away
a fabulous book......hard to underline because every sentence is important
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