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Wild Animals and Settlers on the Great Plains ePub download

by Eugene D. Fleharty

  • Author: Eugene D. Fleharty
  • ISBN: 0806127090
  • ISBN13: 978-0806127095
  • ePub: 1864 kb | FB2: 1346 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Americas
  • Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press; First Edition edition (May 15, 1995)
  • Pages: 336
  • Rating: 4.8/5
  • Votes: 327
  • Format: lit doc rtf mbr
Wild Animals and Settlers on the Great Plains ePub download

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. This unique history chronicles reciprocal relations between settlers and the native fauna of Kansas from the end of the Civil War until 1880.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Wild Animals and Settlers on the Great Plains as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

by Eugene D. Fleharty.

Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1995. xvii+3l6 pp. Illustrations, maps, bibliography, and index. Wild Animals and Settlers on the Great Plains is an informative but flawed book. Fleharty has an adequate grasp of the biological facts, but the book would have benefitted greatly from the collaboration of a historical human geographer or an environmental historian, preferably the latter. Charles A. Flowerday, Conservation and Survey Division, University of NebraskaLincoln.

What has the author Eugene D Fleharty written? . Eugene D. Hart has written: 'The field organization of the Bureau of Land Management, by Eugene D. Hart' - subject(s): U. S. BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, United States.

What has the author Eugene D Fleharty written? Answer. Asked in Authors, Poets, and Playwrights.

Wild Animals and Settlers on the Great Plains is an informative but flawed book. Lacking primary quantitative data, Eugene Fleharty, a zoologist at Fort Hays State University in Hays, Kansas, painstakingly provides a great deal of qualitative, albeit anecdotal, information about Euro-American settlement in Kansas and its effect on the native animal population. Another problem is the title of the book, which purports to deal with the Great Plains but only examines Kansas.

Animals and Children Settlers. About this mod. Now for a radio signal beacon in settlement are held various dogs, cats and children. Author's instructions.

Once the railroad was built the railroad barons began promoting the Great Plains as being terrific for farming and aggressively persuaded hordes of Europeans and Eastern Americans to fill 'these empty lands

While including the development of early-day conservation and game laws, zoologist Eugene D. Fleharty tells of wanton wastefulness on the frontier, but also curiosity, concern, and creativity on the part of individual settlers, who hunted and fished for food and recreation or simply wondered.

While including the development of early-day conservation and game laws, zoologist Eugene D. Fleharty tells of wanton wastefulness on the frontier, but also curiosity, concern, and creativity on the part of individual settlers, who hunted and fished for food and recreation or simply wondered at the animals’ antics.

As sweeping and expansive as the Great Plains themselves, Dan Flores's American Serengeti is 'Big History' at. .

As sweeping and expansive as the Great Plains themselves, Dan Flores's American Serengeti is 'Big History' at its best. The first Lost World was a larger, more diverse collection of animals than that found on the African Serengeti today: elephants, giant bison, enormous herds of horses and zebras, numerous types of camels and deer, elk and pronghorns as well as truly formidable predators including aggressive short-faced bears, saber-toothed cats, wolf and coyote packs, jaguars, cougar, the steppe lion – far larger. than its African cousin – and many others.

This unique history chronicles reciprocal relations between settlers and the native fauna of Kansas from the end of the Civil War until 1880. While including the development of early-day conservation and game laws, zoologist Eugene D. Fleharty tells of wanton wastefulness on the frontier, but also curiosity, concern, and creativity on the part of individual settlers, who hunted and fished for food and recreation or simply wondered at the animals’ antics.

Using only primary accounts from newspapers and diaries, Fleharty vividly portrays frontier life before such species as the bison, beaver, antelope, bear, mountain lion, gray wolf, rattlesnake, and black-footed ferret were more or less extirpated by steel plows, reapers, barbed wire, and firearms. As the author shows the impact of civilization on the prairie ecosystem, readers will share in the lives of the early settlers, experiencing their successes and hardships much as their neighbors did.

This historical account of a typical plains state’s ecology during the traumatic homesteading era will interest professionals concerned with biodiversity and global warming as well as frontier-history buffs.

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