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If Men Were Angels: James Madison and the Heartless Empire of Reason (American Political Thought (University Press of Kansas)) ePub download

by Richard K. Matthews

  • Author: Richard K. Matthews
  • ISBN: 0700608079
  • ISBN13: 978-0700608072
  • ePub: 1690 kb | FB2: 1886 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Americas
  • Publisher: University Press of Kansas (January 18, 1995)
  • Pages: 320
  • Rating: 4.6/5
  • Votes: 347
  • Format: txt lrf doc lrf
If Men Were Angels: James Madison and the Heartless Empire of Reason (American Political Thought (University Press of Kansas)) ePub download

If men were angels, no government would be necessary. Series: American Political Thought (University Press of Kansas). Only a professor writing for a university press could get a book this poor published.

If men were angels, no government would be necessary. The ever wary James Madison viewed his fellow citizens as anything but angelic. In this radically new interpretation. Paperback: 320 pages. Publisher: University Press of Kansas (January 18, 1995). Matthews views are on the most extreme fringes of revisionist interpretations of American history, and may be summarized as follows: Thomas Jefferson was idealistic and good, James Madison was materialistic and bad.

If Men Were Angels book. Paperback, 320 pages. Published January 18th 1995 by University Press of Kansas (first published December 1st 1994). If Men Were Angels: James Madison and the Heartless Empire of Reason. American Political Thought). 0700608079 (ISBN13: 9780700608072).

If Men Were Angels is an examination of the political theory of James Madison authored by Richard K. Matthews. As the jacket notes, it is the "second volume in his revisionist trilogy on the Founding that began with The Radical Politics of Thomas Jefferson and that will conclude with Alexander Hamilton and the Creation of the Heroic State. The purpose of the book is twofold. First, it "tries to construct the complete political theory of James Madison" (p. xvii). 4. "If Madison worshipped a deity, it would be reason-not the substantive Reason of philosophers as diverse as Plato, Hegel, and Marcuse, but the instrumental reason of the modern age" (p. 22).

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Madison, James, 1751-1836 - Contributions in political science. Lawrence, Kan. : University Press of Kansas.

movies All video latest This Just In Prelinger Archives Democracy Now! Occupy Wall Street TV NSA Clip Library. Madison, James, 1751-1836 - Contributions in political science. inlibrary; printdisabled; trent university;. Kahle/Austin Foundation. Nevertheless, Madison's preeminence in the rise of the modern American state has not always been so widely recognized. In this radically new interpretation, Richard Matthews portrays a much less optimistic (and yet more liberal) Madison than we've seen before. Neither civic humanist nor democrat, this Madison is a distrusting, calculating, and pragmatic Machiavellian Prince. And, Matthews contends, what has been written about Madison's political thought has been limited in scope and skewed in interpretation. A devastating critique of Madison's political thought". If Matthews is right - that Madison and Jefferson 'were, from an ideological perspective, worlds apart' - then we must reassess just about everything we think we know about ideology and politics in the early republic". - Journal of American History. The most provocative recent book on Madison". Richard K. Matthews This is an interesting and well-written book worth of careful consideration by students of political theory and American history. In this radically new interpretat. What is government itself but the greatest of all reflections on human nature? If men were angels, no government would be necessary. This is an interesting and well-written book worth of careful consideration by students of political theory and American history. This learned, engaging, and stimulating book has much to offer a wide range of readers.

By Richard K. American Journal of Jurisprudence 40 (1):405-409 (1995). James Boyd White, Heracles' Bow, Essays on the Rhetoric of the Law, Madison, Wisc

By Richard K. This article has no associated abstract. James Boyd White, Heracles' Bow, Essays on the Rhetoric of the Law, Madison, Wisc. University of Wisconsin Press, 1985,£ 2. 0, Xviii+ 251 Pp. Boaventura de Sousa Santos - 1990 - History of the Human Sciences 3 (3):467-474. Adriano Cappelli, The Elements of Abbreviation in Medieval Latin Paleography. David Heimann and Richard Kay.

"What is government itself but the greatest of all reflections on human nature? If men were angels, no government would be necessary."The ever wary James Madison viewed his fellow citizens as anything but angelic. In this radically new interpretation, Richard Matthews portrays a much less optimistic (and yet more liberal) Madison than we've seen before. Neither civic humanist nor democrat, this Madison is a distrusting, calculating, and pragmatic Machiavellian Prince.Hardly an imposing figure, Madison was barely five-feet-six-inches tall, pale complected, a poor speaker, a perpetual hypochondriac and secret epileptic, pursued by bouts of depression and given to dressing in black. And yet his political achievements and intellectual legacy are monumental. Revered as the "Father of the Constitution," Madison was also architect of the "Virginia plan"; one of the two principal authors of The Federalist; leader of the inaugural House of Representatives; reluctant champion of the Bill of Rights; cofounder of the Republican Party, Washington's ghostwriter; Jefferson's Secretary of State; and president and commander-in-chief during America's second war of Independence.Nevertheless, Madison's preeminence in the rise of the modern American state has not always been so widely recognized. And, Matthews contends, what has been written about Madison's political thought has been limited in scope and skewed in interpretation.Unlike previous authors, Matthews goes well beyond Madison's work on the Constitution to reconstruct the complete range of Madison's political thought and intellectual development over the course of his extensive life. In the process, he provides a powerful critique of Madisonian politics. It is possible, he shows, to applaud the energy, design, and intellect that went into Madison's thought and simultaneously challenge the assumptions and values upon which that thought rests.Matthews's Madison understood the potentially fatal problems of a weak, divided state; saw salvation in a strong central government astride an expanding commercial republic; drafted that government's fundamental charter; ran the infant regime as an advisor to two presidents before becoming president himself; and, in retirement, strove to control and manipulate historical interpretations of these efforts. From "The Legislator" to chief executive to keeper of the past and controller of the future, Madison adjusted his political posture to suit the moment. . . . just as Machiavelli's ideal Prince would have done. Madison's system achieved the stability he desired, but at a price Americans should have refused to pay.Provocative and controversial, Matthews's study revises our understanding of this central figure in American history. It illuminates his profound impact upon the America imagined by the Framers, his ongoing influence on the nation we have become, and the tragedy of his success in foreclosing the possibility of a radical Jeffersonian America that never was, but might have been.
Jairani
Only a professor writing for a university press could get a book this poor published. Matthews views are on the most extreme fringes of revisionist interpretations of American history, and may be summarized as follows: Thomas Jefferson was idealistic and good, James Madison was materialistic and bad. If you are inclined to think that this is an exaggeration, I will quote 4 sentences from the very last page of this book (consistent with Amazon.com's guidelines, I am limited to only 4 sentences of quotations): "It was Madison, not Jefferson, who designed the system. Madison's...dream has, as he knew it would, turned into a nightmare for increasing numbers of marginalized Americans. Instead of the chance to pursue happiness, they have neither the opportunity, the hope, nor even the illusion of either. America....has metamorphosed into an intriguing Orwellian-Kafkaesque labyrinth, where a few Ks still search for the reality behind the ideological myth, while the rich find meaning in each of their possessions." If you think that this makes sense, if you believe that this even remotely resembles the vision of James Madison, one of the fathers of our nation and its greatest expert on the American Constitution he did so much to create, then this is your kind of book. If not, I recommend that you save your money and order other books of real value on the life and works of Madison.
Faezahn
Ok
Mojar
This work is truly goundbreaking. The comparison of the liberal/commercial views of James Madison with the radical democratic views of his close friend, Thomas Jefferson are truly enlightening. Matthews shows how Madison was closer to Hamilton than to Jefferson in political philosophy. Madison was obsessed with balance, and order in the liberal tradition. Jefferson,on the other hand, had a vision of radical democracy in the republic. Ward republics, and local democracy were infused into Jefferson's thought. Madison was more concerned with balancing the interests of society and controlling "factions". He viewed government from a more Hobbsian view than other Jeffersonians.Madison was far less trusting of human nature and more concerned with "stability" in society than with experiments in government. This book goes against the grain of current scholarship which unites Jefferson and Madison in philosophy when in fact in many ways they were poles apart. A great book.
Yozshubei
Matthew specializes in pseudohistory books for New York's limousine liberal crowd. This book is a downright distortive pseudohistory that dwells on one Madison quote and inteprets Madison's whole political philosophy as some proto-authoritarian republican advocating a strong central government and "Machiavellian" politics to maintain "stability." The author essentially muddles his own socialistic, authoritarian philosophy on politics with that of James Madison. He tries to reintepret the history of the Presidency of Madison along these lines.
Gogul
I would recommend that anyone looking to understand James Madison reads his actual writings. The Federalist Papers may be a somewhat difficult read, due to the archaic English, but they completely demolish any theory of a James Madison that wants a powerful central government. Better yet, The Original Argument: The Federalists' Case for the Constitution, Adapted for the 21st Century has updated the language for an easier read. The title of the book even references such a quote, although it does not give full context. Just for those interested, the full quote is below:

"If men were angels, no government would be necessary. If angels were to govern men, neither external nor internal controls on government would be necessary. In framing a government which is to be administered by men over men, the great difficulty lies in this: you must first enable the government to control the governed; and in the next place oblige it to control itself. A dependence on the people is, no doubt, the primary control on the government; but experience has taught mankind the necessity of auxiliary precautions."

The author is right about one thing, and one thing only. Madison was a consistent liberal. However, only in the 19th century definition of that word, which meant a very limited and constrained government, and a maximum of personal liberty. The belief that government power and personal liberty are not at odds is something only an irrational person could possibly believe.
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