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The Renegade Sportsman: Drunken Runners, Bike Polo Superstars, Roller Derby Rebels,Killer Birds and Othe r Uncommon Thrills on the Wild Frontier of Sports ePub download

by Zach Dundas

  • Author: Zach Dundas
  • ISBN: 1594484562
  • ISBN13: 978-1594484568
  • ePub: 1704 kb | FB2: 1425 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Americas
  • Publisher: Riverhead Books; 1 edition (June 1, 2010)
  • Pages: 304
  • Rating: 4.3/5
  • Votes: 707
  • Format: docx azw lrf mbr
The Renegade Sportsman: Drunken Runners, Bike Polo Superstars, Roller Derby Rebels,Killer Birds and Othe r Uncommon Thrills on the Wild Frontier of Sports ePub download

A lifelong sports fan, Zach Dundas asks: What happened to the fun, loud-mouthed, down-anddirty sporting culture .

A lifelong sports fan, Zach Dundas asks: What happened to the fun, loud-mouthed, down-anddirty sporting culture he always loved? Has it been replaced with g drugs, fat paychecks and billion dollar arenas? Of course not! With a renegade's eye and a fan's resolve, Dundas scours the underground to find the games, fans, and "athletes" you won't find in the sports pages.

A lifelong sports fan, Zach Dundas asks: What happened to the fu. Now Playing Author Zach Dundas on "The Renegade Sportsman". Where else will you see a roller derby team described as a "sentient meat blizzard"? Eventually, the journalist stops observing and plunges in. Renegade sports culture teaches that "it's better to do things badly yourself than pay to watch other people do them well," he writes. 4 people found this helpful.

Автор: Dundas Zach Название: The Renegade Sportsman: Drunken .

leave here couple of words about this book: Tags: Atlases British. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book.

The Renegade Sportsman book. A face-first dive into America's sporting underbelly  .

Results from Google Books. Maybe that’s why I found such a connection to Zach Dundas’ The Renegade Sportsman

Results from Google Books. Maybe that’s why I found such a connection to Zach Dundas’ The Renegade Sportsman. Many of the sports highlighted as not necessarily out of the ordinary, but the adaptation or venues certainly are. OK, maybe the chapter on professional darts was a revelation to me.

Download PDF book format. The Dorling Kindersley big book of knowledge. Choose file format of this book to download: pdf chm txt rtf doc. Download this format book. by ?The? Dorling Kindersley big book of knowledge.

A face-first dive into America's sporting underbelly. A lifelong sports fan, Zach Dundas asks: What happened to the fun, loud-mouthed, down-and-dirty sporting culture he always loved? Has it been replaced with g drugs, fat paychecks and billion dollar arenas?

A face-first dive into America's sporting underbelly. A lifelong sports fan, Zach Dundas asks: What happened to the fun, loud-mouthed, down-and­dirty sporting culture he always loved? Has it been replaced with performance-enhancing drugs, fat paychecks and billion dollar arenas? Of course not! With a renegade's eye and a fan's resolve, Dundas scours the underground to find the games, fans, and "athletes" you won't find in the sports pages. He tracks a bicycle race across Iowa designed to confuse and downright torture its participants, chases a gaggle of runners wearing red cocktail dresses in Portland, and screams obscenities in Chicago with the rowdy fans of the DC United soccer team, and through these and other harrowing and hilarious adventures, he begins to reconnect with the thrill of sporting as he discovers a vibrant, beautiful, and thriving element of American culture-simmering right below the surface.Watch a Video

Glei
I got two books for Christmas, recommended by different people for different reasons. One was "The Renegade Sportsman", the other was "A Renegade History of the United States" by Thaddeus Russell. Surprisingly, they mean rather the same thing by the word "renegade"; Russell is talking about how a search for freedom among hookers, drunks, layabouts and riffraff led to much of what we value in our culture. Dundas is on a similar trip, looking for the fun and rebellion in sport, the renegades who bring passion, love of the game and style into the cold hearted world corporate sports execs would have us embrace.

So, "The Renegade Sportsman": Pretty good, nice read, and nice ideas. I agree with him about the death of real sport and the awful plastic nature of big league NFL/MLB/whatever. Most importantly, he's a good storyteller, he likes these stories and it shows. He draws you in to stuff you'd never heard of. Very readable.

The tone of the book is set early when he compares big money pro sports to big stadium rock concerts and wonders where the punk rock of the sports world is. That's the quest of the book, and that's his model for what's good or what's not, I think. So if you wonder why you didn't get a call from him about your lifelong skiing obsession, well, when you were a kid you would buy equipment, drive in your parents' station wagon to Aspen and take ski lessons, right? And now you're a good skier and you love it, that's nice. But it's not punk rock. In musical terms you took suburban piano lessons, now you play in a little classical ensemble. Nice, but not punk rock.

What about hunting? Fishing? Various hill climbs and car racing and so on? Sailing adventure races? Not really punk rock, is it? More like country music or roots or Jimmy Buffet or something. So they're not in there either, sorry. He visits a falconer, that's as close to country as it gets. Dundas was raised in Montana, and there's a pretty clear air of Not Going Back There in the thing, which is fine, I wouldn't either, but it makes the book pretty urban-focused.

The best chapters were the long love song to Roller Derby, and he's right on about that, and the biking stuff. Both of these are cool, both have all the punk appeal he likes. The description of the roller derby matches were great sports reporting, then he seamlessly transitions to talking about the politics and money and ownership issues, that's all great stuff, and the bike stuff is gritty and grotty and agonizing, the across Iowa bit was a great story to start the book with.

The stuff about soccer fandom, I mean... He's a soccer fan, ok? So there's a long bit on soccer fandom. The great mystery, why are soccer fans so active and passionate with the singing songs and the hooliganism and so on? Maybe because no one has scored in hours, you have lots of time to sing and get in fights, maybe you can yell and chant enough to keep from falling asleep. Who knows. If you like soccer I guess that will be interesting to you. It's a rather longish section for my tastes, and he's sort of swimming against the current of his basic premise here. MLS is as corporate as it can be. So the core of the booster clubs' passion is this soulless thing, it doesn't really work. One suspects that at some point he will come to this conclusion, that big money sports are just Evil, always, but he's not there yet. So, soccer fandom. Ok.

He tried manfully to learn to fence, but he never got it. Too bad. The collegiate Club Nationals would have been the perfect self organized, loud, beery and grown up punk rock side of fencing to compare to the more youth-club thing he was in.

College club sports in general are the punky amateur backlash against the increasingly corporate collegiate varsity sports machine, maybe he can do a story on that. HEY ZACH, DO A STORY ON CLUB SPORTS! Come on, don't pretend you're not reading this. You know you're reading this. Go on, do a story on club sports! You know you want to.

While you're reading this, go look some more at outdoor stuff. Look at sailboat adventure racing, for example. The Everglades Challenge, or the Texas 200, something like that. And look for something with wheels and grinding gears and motors that you can get into! Americans love motors, there's hill climb madness and all sorts of low budget racing stuff going on all over, you'd love that. It is a little bit country, you're right. Deal with it, think of it as post-punk.

So, it's a little uneven, ok. Or maybe that's not fair, maybe he's just wandering around and finding what he finds, it's a fabulous mix of stuff he's drawn together. The writing is easy, funny, graceful and precise at the same time. Even if he did start as a music critic, he's a sports fan at heart. This isn't one of those awful patronizing Lifestyle section of the newspaper things on weird sports, if there's a real sports story in there he'll find it for you and tell you about it, and he'll draw you into it and into the structure behind the game, who owns what and who's making money or not.

I kept bouncing back between the two books, which I quite recommend doing. The ideas in one really re-enforce the stories in the other; the sports bean counters who named the MLS teams start to look like Puritans, but Puritans in the Church of the Bottom Line. The old west madams with derringers in their garters start to sound a lot like roller derby girls, unwilling to let a pimp or a team owner scrape the profits off what they lay their bodies out for.

So buy both of them, I say. Russell and Dundas together are better than either one separately.
Ytli
In this good-natured romp through the "underbelly" of American sports, Dundas hangs with beer slugging joggers (the Hash House Harriers), brutal overland bicycle racers, denizens of the re-emerging (consciously ironic, self-parodying) national roller derby league, U.S. major league soccer, and fencers (the foil/épée/saber kind).

There are also briefer looks at darts, trans-continental car races, street bike polo, urban golf (played on city streets), the Kentucky Derby as a fairly unco-opted spectator activity, futsal, and falconry.

The author takes a swipe at arena sports and "videophilia," but he doesn't spend a lot of time constructing the case against corporate sports or forecasting the future of the alternatives. The book is mostly an enjoyable look at off-beat physical pastimes -- participatory, grass roots, self-funded, weird and unpredictable, and above all, fun -- and the people who pursue them.

Although Dundas makes a big deal about forays to D.C., Chicago, Austin, and rural Iowa to witness tournaments and talk to participants and organizers, much of the book centers on and celebrates Portland, which is part of its attraction for Portlanders like me, but also a limitation. It's something of a DIY report, by an experienced and adroit writer on a rather limited budget.

In other words, it's partly a love letter to Stumptown: "As one of America's postmodern, Left Coast cities, Portland's traditional jock culture is weak, while its willingness to sacrifice dignity in pursuit of a good time is strong."

Not particularly well organized or analytical, the book does make pleasant company. Where else will you see a roller derby team described as a "sentient meat blizzard"?

Eventually, the journalist stops observing and plunges in. Renegade sports culture teaches that "it's better to do things badly yourself than pay to watch other people do them well," he writes.
Kazimi
Zach Dundas' observations alone are worth the read. He is damn funny and has a wonderful knack for pointing out the hilarious absurdities in everyday life. I myself am marginally interested and involved in sports- I have dabbled here and there, but never thought I would find myself reading a book devoted specifically to such a topic. This book is well worth the read, even for the un-sporty. Aside from learning about all the off the wall sporting pursuits out there, the greatest part of this book is Dundas' encouragement of sports enthusiasts and participants who do not fit the usual super-athletic, or even physically coordinated mold. He is encouraging of everyone who has ever been interested in playing a sport or even making up a sport of their own, but has been too afraid to do so for fear of failure, injury or just plain embarrassment. His simple message is just to get off the couch, bleachers, barstool, etc. and just get out there and do it and have fun (and perhaps a few drinks) while you are at it. I heartily recommend this book!
Xtreem
This book inspired me to go out and look for "Renegade" sports in my own community. It is so much more fun to watch these fringe athletic contests then many of today's professional contests.
Zach Dundas has a very pleasing writing style, I was immediately drawn into the book and his descriptions of his adventures. It's a fun read!
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