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Let Me Finish ePub download

by Roger Angell

  • Author: Roger Angell
  • ISBN: 015603218X
  • ISBN13: 978-0156032186
  • ePub: 1618 kb | FB2: 1649 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Americas
  • Publisher: Mariner Books; First edition (June 4, 2007)
  • Pages: 320
  • Rating: 4.9/5
  • Votes: 772
  • Format: doc rtf mbr lrf
Let Me Finish ePub download

Praise for roger angell and let me finish

Praise for roger angell and let me finish. One of the most entertaining and gracious prose styles of his gracious generation. A lovely book and an honest one. Let Me Finish" seems intended to give pleasure, a book in which many people Angell loved and honored are remembered perhaps as kindly as possible, rather like the thank you speeches on receiving an award. For those who cherish "Charlotte's Web," the chapter, "Andy," is in itself a reason for reading "Let Me Finish.

Now, in Let Me Finish, a deeply personal, fresh form of autobiography, he takes an unsentimental look at his early days as a boy growing up in Prohibition-era New York with a remarkable father; a mother, Katharine White, who was a founding e Widely known as an original and graceful writer, Roger Angell has developed a devoted following through his essays in.

E. B. White died in 1985- twenty years ago,. and more-and by "missing" I don't mean yearning for him so much as not being able to keep hold of him for a bit of conversation or even a tone of voice. In my mind, this is at his place in North Brooklin, Maine, and he's almost still around. I see his plaid button-down shirt and tweed jacket, and his good evening moccasins.

In Let Me Finish, Angell reflects on a remarkable life (while admitting to not really remembering the essentials) and on its influences large and small-from growing up in Prohibition-era New York, to his boyhood romance with.

In Let Me Finish, Angell reflects on a remarkable life (while admitting to not really remembering the essentials) and on its influences large and small-from growing up in Prohibition-era New York, to his boyhood romance with baseball, to crossing paths with such twentieth-century luminaries as Babe Ruth, John Updike, Joe DiMaggio, . Perelman, and W. Somerset Maugham. Personal, reflective, funny, delightfully random, and disarming, this is a unique collection of scenes from a life by the New York Times bestselling author of The Summer Game, one of the most entertaining and gracious prose stylists of hi. eneration (Time).

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LET ME FINISH and THE SUMMER GAME, a great pairing of two different Angell books, are discounted as US ebooks today.

LET ME FINISH and THE SUMMER GAME, a great pairing of two different Angell books, are discounted as US ebooks today. Check them out for the weekend! explorethearchive. Today's Best History Ebook Deals. Treat yourself to a great read.

Widely known as an original and graceful writer, Roger Angell has developed a devoted following through his essays in the New Yorker. Widely known as an original and graceful writer, Roger Angell has developed a devoted following through his essays in the New Yorker.

His father, lawyer Ernest Angell, lost Katherine to the younger White but over the years became a figure of immense importance to Roger. Angell loved his mother, loved White, loved his first wife (not much here about the cause of their 1960s divorce), loved his coworkers, loved his job. His portraits are really tributes, whether of the well-known William Maxwell, . Pritchett, Harold Ross or William Shawn, or the lesser-known Botsford and Emily Hahn.

Read full description of the books: Widely known as an original and graceful writer, Roger Angell has developed a devoted following through his essays in the New Yorker.

Angell’s absorbing collection traces the highs and lows of major-league baseball in the 1980s Roger Angell o. ISBN10 : 9781453297834, ISBN13 : 1453297839.

ISBN10 : 9780385541145, ISBN13 : 0385541147. Angell’s absorbing collection traces the highs and lows of major-league baseball in the 1980s Roger Angell o.

Widely known as an original and graceful writer, Roger Angell has developed a devoted following through his essays in the New Yorker. Now, in Let Me Finish, a deeply personal, fresh form of autobiography, he takes an unsentimental look at his early days as a boy growing up in Prohibition-era New York with a remarkable father; a mother, Katharine White, who was a founding editor of the New Yorker; and a famous stepfather, the writer E. B. White. Intimate, funny, and moving portraits form the book’s centerpiece as Angell remembers his surprising relatives, his early attraction to baseball in the time of Ruth and Gehrig and DiMaggio, and his vivid colleagues during a long career as a New Yorker writer and editor. Infused with pleasure and sadness, Angell’s disarming memoir also evokes an attachment to life’s better moments.
Hi_Jacker
"Let Me Finish" would be interesting as snapshots from the last half of the 20th century, even if the reader knows little about Angell's illustrious career as a sports-writer and New Yorker fiction editor & that E. B. White was his step-father. These connections add much, to be sure, but the "Let Me Finish" stories can stand on their own. Angell tells about the spring and summer of a long-gone world: the New Yorker Magazine in its heyday, the post World War II days, and the adventures of a youth & then man mostly in New York City and Maine. The writing is smooth as a Martini, well-chilled & generously refilled.

In his mid-80s, Roger Angell brought together anecdotes from his personal and professional life. His mother, Katharine Sargeant White of the New Yorker, left his father, Ernest Angell, a well-to-do lawyer, under circumstances that awarded custody of the two children to the husband. Almost immediately after the divorce, she married a considerably younger man, E. B. ("Andy") White. Roger and his sister visited the Whites on weekends and vacations, as well as others from a clan intricately cobbled together from divorces and re-marriages.

"Let Me Finish" offers 17 chapters, loosely chronological, beginning when Angell was about eight. The last chapters reflect on the deaths of a troubled writer he edited, of his parents, of his friends, and his feelings as one likely to catch the next train himself.

There are some cheerful memories, including "Dry Martini," "We Are Fam-ilee," "Movie Kid," "Ancient Mariner," and "At the Comic Weekly" shining the spotlight on New Yorker worthies such as Harold Ross & Emily Hahn (what a woman!). In "Permanent Party" he volunteers for the Army, winding up as a instructor on the Browning .50 caliber machine gun (rather like "The Naming of Parts"), and marries his first wife, Evelyn.

"Let Me Finish" feels like going through boxes of old pictures with your grandfather. Angell remembers the names & stories of all the people in these photos, some of whom are familiar to you though most are not. He tells you their stories, honorably reminding you when others differ in their views, particularly when he speaks of his father's character. One knows these are only a few of a lifetime of such tales, but is not sure if he'd selected the incidents most important to him or the ones he thought you'd most like to hear. Possibly the latter, since little is told of his second wife & his children. This uncertainty is among the differences between Angell's my-life-through-stories and what a full-on biography might show.

Reader Alert: There is a "Great Gatsby" quality to this book because Roger Angell's world involved private schools, yachts small & larger, trips to Europe, dinners with the likes of Marietta Tree & Somerset Maugham, city residences around New York's 88th street and the expansive country places, as well as household servants. One chapter, "La Vie en Rose" which starts with Angell companionably pe*ing in Ditchley with Ronald Tree & Edward VIII's close friend, old Fruity, I'd initially thought was a humorous or at least satirical send-up, but, nope: Angell is just telling about how it was for him, Not a world of clear sunny days personally perhaps, but stormy externalities such as the Depression and struggles for civil rights are mentioned primarily as they affected his lawyer father.

"Let Me Finish" seems intended to give pleasure, a book in which many people Angell loved and honored are remembered perhaps as kindly as possible, rather like the thank you speeches on receiving an award. For those who cherish "Charlotte's Web," the chapter, "Andy," is in itself a reason for reading "Let Me Finish." Among the anecdotes, in chapters such as this, there are wisdom & mellowness.

A fine value at used book prices. Readers can expect several pleasant evenings sharing the remembrances of times past with a man we may be happy to know now, even if we didn't before we began reading, "One spring morning when I was seven going on eight...
Risinal
Enjoyable look at a writer's career at the New Yorker magazine. The narrative brings back many memories of growing up in New York. I highly recommend the book to those who are interested in reading about the life of writers.
Malara
Super book by one the New Yorker's greatest writers on baseball. It came almost instantaneously like a trick arranged by Einstein! Thanks for excellent service!
Robert M.
Hasirri
Memoirs and memory of a long time member of the New Yorker "family". If you are a NYer reader, this is a must. If not, it is probably a good introduction to a very special segment of the New York literary life. Some of the pieces are nostalgic. All witty. Some funny. A few sad. Good mix.
Pemand
A vivid recollection of a life woven through the lives of famous and not so famous people, like E B White, centered in the world of the New Yorker in the first half of the 21st century.
Centrizius
Great book.
Mejora
What a treasure! I had seen Roger Angell interviewed recently. To my delighted surprise, the book is as charming and intelligent as it's author. Great price. Great condition. Would definitely buy from this seller again.Two thumbs up all around.
Oh, the places he's been, and the people he knows.
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