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Do (Not) Feed the Bears: The Fitful History of Wildlife and Tourists in Yellowstone ePub download

by Alice Wondrak Biel

  • Author: Alice Wondrak Biel
  • ISBN: 0700614583
  • ISBN13: 978-0700614585
  • ePub: 1117 kb | FB2: 1797 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Americas
  • Publisher: University Press of Kansas; Annotated edition edition (March 16, 2006)
  • Pages: 198
  • Rating: 4.2/5
  • Votes: 730
  • Format: lrf doc azw rtf
Do (Not) Feed the Bears: The Fitful History of Wildlife and Tourists in Yellowstone ePub download

It's an easy read with lots of stories and informative history.

I long for books like Biel’s Grizzly story-a sharp, complex history of our encounters with animals that's also a lovely, fun piece of writing. It's an easy read with lots of stories and informative history.

Start by marking Do (Not) Feed the Bears: The Fitful .

Start by marking Do (Not) Feed the Bears: The Fitful History of Wildlife and Tourists in Yellowstone as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Alice Wondrak Biel traces the evolution of their complex relationship with humans-from the creation of the first staged wildlife viewing areas to the present-and situates that relationship within the broader context of American cultural history. The book does this by following the development of Yellowstone National Park and detailing the history of people and their relationship with bears. At times it got a little difficult with all those names of people I had never heard of before, but overall it is an excellent book.

Up until this point the book has been focused on dogs and horses in the leisure experience.

It may have been against the rules, but park officials were willing to turn a blind eye if it kept the public happy. It was a short leap from tourists' watching bears being fed to tourists habitually feeding bears themselves (Biel, 2006). Up until this point the book has been focused on dogs and horses in the leisure experience. This focus arguably reflects the dominant position of these animals in the leisure of humans.

Do (Not) Feed the Bears: The Fitful History of Wildlife and Tourists in Yellowstone Biel Alice Wondrak Неизвестно 9780700614585 : Draws on the history of recorded interactions with bears and . 2006 Язык: ENG Иллюстрации: 14 photographs Размер: 2. 6 x 1. 4 x . 8 cm Читательская аудитория: General (us: trade) Подзаголовок: The fitful history of wildlife and tourists in yellowstone Рейтинг: Поставляется из: США Описание: Draws on the history of recorded interactions with bears and provides telling photographs, which depict the evolving bear-human relationship.

Alice Wondrak Biel traces the evolution of their complex relationship with .

Alice Wondrak Biel traces the evolution of their complex relationship with humans-from the creation of the first staged wildlife viewing areas to the present-and situates that relationship within the broader context of American cultural history. Drawing on the history of recorded interactions with bears and providing telling photographs depicting the evolving bear-human relationship, Biel traces the reaction of park visitors to the NPS's efforts-from warnings by Yogi Bear (which few tourists took seriously) to the increasing promotion of key ecological issues and concerns.

It was a familiar sight at Yellowstone National Park: traffic backed up for miles as visitors fed bears from their cars. It may have been against the rules, but park officials were willing to turn a blind eye if it kept the public happy. But bear feeding eventually became too widespread and dangerous to everyone-including the bears-for the National Park Service (NPS) to allow it any longer. As one of the park's most beloved and enduring symbols, the Yellowstone bears have long been a flashpoint for controversy.

the Bears : The Fitful History of Wildlife and Tourists in Yellowstone.

Do (Not) Feed the Bears : The Fitful History of Wildlife and Tourists in Yellowstone. by Alice Wondrak Biel. It was a familiar sight at Yellowstone National Park: traffic backed upfor miles as visitors fed bears from their cars. It may have been againstthe rules, but park officials were willing to turn a blind eye if it kept thepublic happy.

Ultimately, as the rules were enforced and tourist behavior dramatically shifted, the bears returned to a more natural state of existence

Ultimately, as the rules were enforced and tourist behavior dramatically shifted, the bears returned to a more natural state of existence.

Do (Not) Feed the Bears: The Fitful History of Wildlife And Tourists in Yellowstone by Alice Wondrak Biel (A. .

Do (Not) Feed the Bears: The Fitful History of Wildlife And Tourists in Yellowstone by Alice Wondrak Biel (A GREAT history of bear management in the park). For other guides go to ww. n. They have a lot to choose from.

In fact, as historian Alice Wondrak Biel explains in Do (Not) Feed The Bears: The Fitful History of Wildlife and Tourists in Yellowstone, they . His successors, slightly less sold on the wisdom of enabling wildlife encounters, began to slowly phase out bear-feeding.

In fact, as historian Alice Wondrak Biel explains in Do (Not) Feed The Bears: The Fitful History of Wildlife and Tourists in Yellowstone, they banked on it-building elaborate bear show pits, failing to enforce the park’s no-feeding rules, and tacitly encouraging the many black bears who roamed the roads, holding up cars for food. Today, it’s strange to think of having to sell the idea of Yellowstone to anyone. Park biologists submitted new guidelines for the park, predicated on the idea that every specie. e left to carry on its struggle for existence unaided.

It was a familiar sight at Yellowstone National Park: traffic backed up for miles as visitors fed bears from their cars. It may have been against the rules, but park officials were willing to turn a blind eye if it kept the public happy. But bear feeding eventually became too widespread and dangerous to everyone—including the bears—for the National Park Service (NPS) to allow it any longer. As one of the park's most beloved and enduring symbols, the Yellowstone bears have long been a flashpoint for controversy. Alice Wondrak Biel traces the evolution of their complex relationship with humans—from the creation of the first staged wildlife viewing areas to the present—and situates that relationship within the broader context of American cultural history. Early on, park bears were largely thought of as performers or surrogate pets and were routinely fed handouts from cars, as well as hotel garbage dumped at park-sanctioned "lunch counters for bears." But as these activities led to ever-greater numbers of tourist injuries, and of bears killed as a result, and as ideas about conservation and the NPS mission changed, the agency refashioned the bear's image from cute circus performer to dangerous wild animal and, eventually, to keystone inhabitant of a fragile ecosystem. Drawing on the history of recorded interactions with bears and providing telling photographs depicting the evolving bear-human relationship, Biel traces the reaction of park visitors to the NPS's efforts—from warnings by Yogi Bear (which few tourists took seriously) to the increasing promotion of key ecological issues and concerns. Ultimately, as the rules were enforced and tourist behavior dramatically shifted, the bears returned to a more natural state of existence.Biel's entertaining and informative account tracks this gradual "renaturalization" while also providing a cautionary tale about the need for careful negotiation at the complex nexus of tourists, bears, and all things wild.
Tuliancel
Everybody who loves Yellowstone (and any other park for that matter) really would enjoy this book. It's an easy read with lots of stories and informative history. I'd always known that we shouldn't feed the bears-- this book helped me understand why.
Not-the-Same
Great book with interesting stories!
romrom
good read.
Jaberini
Great book
Qulcelat
I bought this book about a year ago. I feel this book is easy to read, well written and told the story of the history of the black and grizzly bears of Yellowstone National Park. I highly commend the author for not glossing over some of the ugly past issues of bear policy. I laughed and cried at the ineptness of park managers when learning to deal with bears and the public. I did not know a lot about the past bear management in Yellowstone and found it heartbreaking to learn how the bears have been mismanaged in the park, from feeding platforms to letting visitors hand feed bears by the roadside. I was shocked to learn the numbers of bears that have been destroyed because of these issues!! I am glad that the park has gone full circle and now cherishes the natural bear and are working to do all they can to preserve bears and relocate them rather than destroy them. When you see a bear, please don't feed it.
Samugul
Yeap, I bought the book because of the adorable cover, and I am not at all sorry. The book is brief, readable and informative. It covers bear policy at Yellowstone, but not simplistically. Rather, it uses bear management policy to talk about our own ideas about nature, wilderness, and how those ideas have changed over the past 100 years. It is largely jargon free--or at least always explains it--and I found the book a delight.
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