» » Octopus: Sam Israel, the Secret Market, and Wall Street's Wildest Con

Octopus: Sam Israel, the Secret Market, and Wall Street's Wildest Con ePub download

by Guy Lawson

  • Author: Guy Lawson
  • ISBN: 0307716074
  • ISBN13: 978-0307716071
  • ePub: 1743 kb | FB2: 1663 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Americas
  • Publisher: Crown; 1st Edition edition (July 10, 2012)
  • Pages: 368
  • Rating: 4.6/5
  • Votes: 705
  • Format: azw mobi txt lrf
Octopus: Sam Israel, the Secret Market, and Wall Street's Wildest Con ePub download

Octopus: Sam Israel, the Secret Market, and Wall Street's Wildest Con is a 2012 non-fiction book by the Canadian author and journalist Guy Lawson. The book was published by Crown Publishing on July 10, 2012.

Octopus: Sam Israel, the Secret Market, and Wall Street's Wildest Con is a 2012 non-fiction book by the Canadian author and journalist Guy Lawson. Octopus focuses on Wall Street trader Samuel Israel III, who attempted to commit hedge fund fraud by taking part in a "secret market" reported to have been run by the Federal Reserve.

Lawson found gol. his is a fantastic story, in both senses of the word, with a freshness that recalls Liars Poker

Lawson found gol. his is a fantastic story, in both senses of the word, with a freshness that recalls Liars Poker. -Bryan Burrough, New York Times Read this book to understand Wall Stree. omeone is going to Octopus into a movie. By this time next year, Lawson will have a fat dea. he reason for that is that Octopus is an incredible dark comedy with one of the craziest true-life ironic twists you can possibly imagine.

Read this book to understand Wall Stree. Matt Taibbi, Rolling Stone . Bloomberg Businessweek.

He'll talk about Sam Israel, a real life Wall Street con ma. For Beyond 50's "History" talks, listen to an interview with Guy Lawson

He'll talk about Sam Israel, a real life Wall Street con man. He was the target of . .For Beyond 50's "History" talks, listen to an interview with Guy Lawson. He'll talk about Sam Israel, a real life Wall Street con man. He was the target of a nationwide manhunt. Whether the "secret market" was real or a con, Israel was all in - and as the pressures mounted and increasingly sinister violence crept into his life, he struggled to break free of the Octopus' tentacles. Tune in to Beyond 50: America's Variety Talk Radio Show on the natural, holistic, green and sustainable lifestyle. Visit ww. eyond50Radio.

Электронная книга "Octopus: Sam Israel, the Secret Market, and Wall Street's Wildest Con", Guy Lawson. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Octopus: Sam Israel, the Secret Market, and Wall Street's Wildest Con" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Born into one of America's most illustrious trading families, Sam Israel was determined to strike out on his ow.

Born into one of America's most illustrious trading families, Sam Israel was determined to strike out on his own. After apprenticing with one of the greatest traders of the 1980s, he founded his own fast-growing hedge fund, promising investors extraordinary returns. But it was all an elaborate charade. Thus began his bizarre journey into "the Upperworld" - a society populated by clandestine bankers, shady European nobility, and spooks issuing cryptic warnings about a mysterious cabal known as the Octopus.

Sam Israel saw that Wall Street made its money cheating, and he also saw that the government enabled the cheating

Sam Israel saw that Wall Street made its money cheating, and he also saw that the government enabled the cheating. He then drew what seemed to him a logical third conclusion, which was that the two realms were conspiring in secret to make a second shadow market for the elite of the elite, one bursting with fantastic riches. He didn't realize that the real market was the shadow market.

The book is based on a story I wrote for Rolling Stone.

Octopus: Sam Israel, the Secret Market, and Wall Street's Wildest Con," by Guy Lawson. July 25, 2012, 2:22 PM, CBS News. Jeff Glor: What inspired you to write the book? Guy Lawson: When I first talked to Sam Israel in prison I thought I was working on a story about a Wall Street fraudster-at the time the biggest ever. But Israel started to tell me this entirely different story about a secret bond market and the CIA and how the Federal Reserve is running a Ponzi scheme. It was literally incredible-as in unbelievable. The book is based on a story I wrote for Rolling Stone. It's a truly rip roaring tale filled with weed, weapons, and wartime deceptions.

Octopus focuses on Wall Street trader Samuel Israel III, who attempted to commit hedge fund fraud by taking part in a "secret market" reported to have been run by the Federal Reserve

Octopus focuses on Wall Street trader Samuel Israel III, who attempted to commit hedge fund fraud by taking part in a "secret market" reported to have been run by the Federal Reserve. Critical reception for Octopus was mostly positive. Fortune magazine praised Lawson for going "out.

Octopus is a real-life thriller that tells the inside story of an audacious hedge fund fraud and the wild search, by a colorful cast of rogues and schemers, for a “secret market” beneath the financial market we all know. Sam Israel was a man who seemed to have it all – until the hedge fund he ran, Bayou, imploded and he became the target of a nationwide manhunt.  Born into one of America’s most illustrious trading families, Israel was determined to strike out on his own.  So after apprenticing with one of the greatest hedge fund traders of the 1980’s, Sam founded his own fund and promised his investors guaranteed profits.  With the proprietary computer program he’d created, he claimed to be able to predict the future.  But his future was already beginning to unravel. After suffering devastating losses and fabricating fake returns, Israel knew it was only a matter of time before his real performance would be discovered, so when a former black-ops intelligence operative told him about a “secret market” run by the Fed, Israel bet his last $150 million on a chance to make billions. Thus began his year-long adventure in “the Upperworld” -- a society populated by clandestine bankers, shady European nobility, and spooks issuing cryptic warnings about a mysterious cabal known as the Octopus.  Whether the “secret market” was real or a con, Israel was all in – and as the pressures mounted and increasingly sinister violence crept into his life, he struggled to break free of the Octopus’ tentacles.

Ishnjurus
As a former stock broker and securities analyst on Wall Street, I especially enjoyed reading this very revealing book. The author conducted exhaustive research on Sam Israel, the founder of a growing hedge fund, and the story reminds me of a James Bond novel. This book also exposes a number of "financial conspiracy theories" that are still floating around -- and proves they are just confidence schemes. If you're interested in Wall Street and some of it's "black secrets," you'll really enjoy this book -- I recommend it highly.
Dianalmeena
Octopus opens with a suicide, and by the end of the book you've encountered frauds, spies, scam artists, lunatics, killers, Chinese gold, shadow markets, thirteen families that run the world, the lost Zapruder footage, and General Zod's henchman. None of this is an exaggeration.

This book is insane. It's supposed to be about Sam Israel, who is Bernie Madoff light: a Ponzi scammer, but one who retains a degree of sympathy - he at least didn't mean to defraud his victims. But the text reads like Wiseguy, nee Goodfellas, and ultimately descends into a world of madness that I don't know how to describe without spoiling it for you.

If you are interested in a look behind the scenes of Wall Street and global finance, read this book. If you are interested in a tale of madness and desperation, read this book. If you believe in the New World Order and think the CIA teamed up with the Mafia to kill Kennedy, read this book. You will not be disappointed.
Yananoc
This is the best non-fictional story of intrigue of the decade. If you're curious about how the world works, how smart people end up doing stupid things, and, especially, how the elite perceive the nature of the power structure and their place within it...well, how have you not read this book yet? I heard about it on the Majority Report, the ideas instantly captured my imagination, and it did not disappoint. Smarter people than me have written thorough reviews, and they really are helpful for greater context. All I will say is that I cannot recommend this book highly enough. Stop what you're doing and read it.
Malalanim
I loved this book, and have reread it several times. It begins with Sam Israel as a not so skilled trader who starts faking reports to his investors to give himself time to try to trade himself out of a hole. Then it goes into a whole new dimension when Israel gets sucked into a long con involving a supposed secret parallel financial system in which 100 percent return no risk investments are possible. That is the part of the book which is fascinating.
Arcanefist
Guy Lawson's Octopus was a tremendous read. I was familiar with the story of the collapse of Bayou, but did not pay attention to the details at the time. There are so many twists and turns in this book, many of which are truly hard to believe. One wonders whether Sam Israel's chronic pain and self-medication made him susceptible to being conned. In the end, this is another cautionary tale that clearly demonstrates that greed certainly is not good.
Whiteflame
Think about that for a moment..... If I build something with my own two hands, like some furniture for instance, then I know it's real. And if I USE said furniture, say a table and two chairs, then I know it's even more real as it has a use, obviously, and perhaps even some value. To me personally, this is the ultimate in reality: using something that you have built with your own two hands. As a nation, we do not do this kinda thing very much anymore. We don't place value on engineering and manufacturing like we used to (or education for that matter). We have become something fake ourselves; we've become consumers, fraudsters, and con men; we've become ever more a service industry and wage slaves that feed upon our own consumerism and we've been dumbed down watching reality TV shows like the Kardashians -- the ultimate family fraudsters. We buy things that aren't even physically real. We call software "prodicts". We buy apps for our smartphones (that are made in China). And minutes! Like Verizon invented minutes and started selling them to us! And in the span of a few hundred years, we went from gold to paper money to electronic nothingness to pay for it all.

If you got sort of a sick, sinking feeling in the pit of your gut or felt a bit unsettled while reading this book like I did -- don't be alarmed! -- as that is normal for an individual who still has a grasp on reality. This also happens to me whenever I read a Philip K. Dick novel. The lines between what I believe to be real or not get kinda blurred while I'm reading, and a sinking feeling of dread comes over me as I start to doubt my own belief system. "Am I crazy?" "I this real?" "I wonder, what do people really think of me?" etc. etc.

I'm not a big conspiracy buff. I don't think that there's a huge conspiracy of old white rich men running the world with billions upon billions in currency and gold using a black wallstreetstyle market, but I do think, and it looks to be true, that the American public is being defrauded by wallstreet, by the big banks, by people like Sam Israel and our government officials are not going to do anything about it any time soon.
Charyoll
Sam Israel is not your normal financial guy. No, he's like Jordon Belfort without all of the pazzaz! You get to see how greedy and narcissistic these Wall Street guys can become through Sam's eyes. Capitalism is great, but it can be abused and Sam (like Jordan) does this quite well! If you like Wall Street stories, this one is for you!
E-Books Related to Octopus: Sam Israel, the Secret Market, and Wall Street's Wildest Con: