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Cesarean Section: Understanding and Celebrating Your Baby's Birth (A Johns Hopkins Press Health Book) ePub download

by Michele C. Moore MD,Caroline M. de Costa MD

  • Author: Michele C. Moore MD,Caroline M. de Costa MD
  • ISBN: 0801873363
  • ISBN13: 978-0801873362
  • ePub: 1293 kb | FB2: 1365 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Women's Health
  • Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press; 1 edition (May 16, 2003)
  • Pages: 160
  • Rating: 4.6/5
  • Votes: 272
  • Format: lit mbr mobi azw
Cesarean Section: Understanding and Celebrating Your Baby's Birth (A Johns Hopkins Press Health Book) ePub download

by Michele C. Moore MD (Author), Caroline M. de Costa MD (Author). Series: A Johns Hopkins Press Health Book. Paperback: 160 pages.

by Michele C. ISBN-13: 978-0801873379.

They explain why Cesarean births are sometimes preferable to vaginal delivery for both mother and baby, and they help women understand the issues behind the decision to perform the procedure. From anesthesia, surgery, and recovery through at-home care of mother and child, the authors offer reassurance and practical information for all mothers and mothers-to-be. They also discuss the latest findings on postpartum depression and planning for future births, including the possibility.

Cesarean Section book. One in four babies born in the United States and Europe comes into. They explain why Cesarean births are sometimes preferable to vaginal delivery for both mother and baby, and they help women understand the issues behind the decision to perform the procedure.

This is a very good book with an excellent examination of the whys and hows of C-sections. I'm recommending this one for the library at my birth center because it's very helpful in presenting medical information to a layman audience without talking down to them, and it even helped me understand my medical record.

Michele Moore and Caroline de Costa - two physicians who have been down this road themselves - offer reliable medical expertise and .

Michele Moore and Caroline de Costa - two physicians who have been down this road themselves - offer reliable medical expertise and personal reassurance to women tackling these challenges. Pregnancy and Parenting after Thirty-Five covers a broad range of issues for mothers in mid life, from the possibility of Cesarean section to the awkwardness of being the oldest mom at PTA meetings to the joy of holding your infant in your arms. One of the few books devoted to prospective mothers over thirty-five, this one also includes information on surrogacy, adoption, and the first few months of being a new mother. Скачать (pdf, . 1 Mb) Читать. Epub FB2 mobi txt RTF.

Moore, Michele; De Costa, Caroline, 1947 . Baltimore : The Johns Hopkins University Press.

Moore, Michele; De Costa, Caroline, 1947-. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; ctlibrary; china; americana. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Delaware County District Library (Ohio).

Professor Caroline May de Costa (née Downes; born 1947) is Professor of Obstetrics and Gynaecology at James . Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press.

Professor Caroline May de Costa (née Downes; born 1947) is Professor of Obstetrics and Gynaecology at James Cook University, Queensland, Australia, as well as an advocate for indigenous health and abortion rights. She also writes medical nonfiction books and crime novels. De Costa, Caroline (2006). Pregnancy and parenting after thirty-five : mid life, new life. Baltimore, M. Johns Hopkins University Press. From anesthesia, surgery, and recovery through at-home care of mother and child, the authors offer reassurance and practical information for all mothers and mothers-to-be

9780801873379 Cesarean Section. Johns Hopkins Press Health Books (Paperback).

9780801873379 Cesarean Section.

A Johns Hopkins Press Health Book. Michele C. Moore, . Caroline M. de Costa, . is a practicing obstetrician and professor of obstetrics and gynecology at James Cook University Medical School, Cairns, Australia.

One in four babies born in the United States and Europe comes into the world via Cesarean section. Yet this procedure has been described by critics as an unnecessary and potentially dangerous medical intervention. Consequently, expectant mothers often fear this option, and women who have had C-sections can feel a sense of failure.

In Cesarean Section: Understanding and Celebrating Your Baby's Birth, Drs. Michele Moore and Caroline de Costa emphasize the joy of delivering a healthy baby, however that is best achieved. They explain why Cesarean births are sometimes preferable to vaginal delivery for both mother and baby, and they help women understand the issues behind the decision to perform the procedure. From anesthesia, surgery, and recovery through at-home care of mother and child, the authors offer reassurance and practical information for all mothers and mothers-to-be. They also discuss the latest findings on postpartum depression and planning for future births, including the possibility of vaginal birth after a Cesarean section.

For every woman who has a planned―or unplanned―Cesarean section, this book provides the information they need to alleviate their fears and come to value this delivery option.

"Because up to a quarter of all births are Cesarean births, prenatal preparation should include information about Cesarean sections for every woman. And that is why we have written this guide.... We believe strongly that it is time to speak out and say that Cesarean section is a normal birth method and that women who have a Cesarean section should not be made to feel that they have failed.... We hope you find the information in this book useful and helpful in thinking about C-section, whether you have already had a Cesarean and want to understand the experience better, you wish to plan for another C-section birth, or you are expecting a baby and want to be informed about all the possibilities ahead, including this other normal way of bringing a baby into the world."―from the Introduction

huckman
As a mother who had a cesarean with her first child, I wanted to be fully informed as I try to make the decision between a repeat cesarean and a VBAC. I *wish* I had read this book before I went into labor with #1!

First of all, I don't think that the book at all leans toward anything but preparing moms for something that can happen to all of us. And they're quite realistic by saying that nearly 25% of all US births are cesareans, so it's better to be prepared for the possibility than to not be prepared. This book is designed to give you the tools you'll need to prepare for said possibility.

I so wish I'd read this before my first child was born, but like most of us, I didn't think that it could happen to me. I love that it gives you possible reasons for having one in a very non-judgemental way. C-sections are stressful enough to contemplate, especially stressful if you have to have one, and this book emphasizes that it's no one's fault if you end up being a c-section mom. It tells you how to deal with recovery and emphasizes that having a problem that leads to a cesarean doesn't mean that you're less of a woman. It's just another way to give birth.

I especially enjoyed the sections on getting yourself back in shape after a c-section. I had no idea that a cesarean would affect my abs the way that it has, and I didn't know how to get them back. This book outlines an abdominal exercise routine to start after a cesarean, although I think it can be used after a vaginal birth, too.

I still haven't made my final decision, but I wanted to be a bit more informed about both options. I found that too many VBAC proponents try to make you feel that cesareans are the work of Satan, and I just didn't feel that way after they prevented my daughter from being injured by a vaginal birth when it was discovered (just as they were about to tell me to start pushing) that she was a footling breech. The book actually says to keep an open mind about VBAC and gives you examples of both successful and unsuccessful VBACs. I think that it's fair to tell women that it might not work out if they decide to try for one, since only 60-80% of attempted VBACs are successful. Meaning that 20-40% aren't and that you need to consider that, even if you're trying for and really want a VBAC, you might not get what you want.
Itiannta
This is a great book that is informational and offers a lot of support for cesarean birth moms. A must read!!
Wizard
This is a phenomenal book about an issue that is obviously important to many current and soon-to-be mothers. Making the decision to give birth with a c-section is not something to be taken lightly, nor is it one that can be made by anybody other than the mother and doctor. I'm writing this as a husband and father who is about to help -- in as much as I can -- his wife give birth again. My wife was sharing some of the negative reviews of this book earlier, and I had to put my thoughts down. My purpose here is two-fold: to endorse this book and to also counteract the unnecessarily personal attacks of the few negative reviews.

First, this book. We read through it in the library last night and were awe-struck at the fact that there was finally an objective description of what a c-section is, how and why it's done, and any complications that may arise. Our first was born 10 years ago through emergency c-section after 17 hours of what can only be described as Herculean labor. He wasn't dropping, but my wife was fully dilated and experience chart-breaking contractions. Induction could have either harmed him or her, so we opted for the operation. We thought we had failed in our quest for the perfect birth. Even though he's awesome, healthy, and both he and my wife came out shiny, we thought we had failed. If this book was around at that time, perhaps we would not have been living in guilt all this time.

Secondly, to those of you who seem to think that a negative review of this book is the same as a slam against women who choose c-sections. Who do you think you are? The whole purpose of feminism and equal rights is to allow all people -- male and female -- the right to make their own decisions in their own way. This book is a tool in that decision-making process, and as a tool it is a really good one.

Maybe your objections are to the perception that doctors push for cesareans more than they should. If that's the case, then aim your vitriol at those doctors, not at the women who are being pushed. Perhaps your objections are based on the idea that you feel there isn't enough objective information out there for a woman to make a good decision. If so, then help provide that information. Don't you dare, however, spend your time simply mouthing off with your own possibly ill-conceived and misunderstood ideas about what's "right" and "wrong". Especially don't do that if you think you're a proponent of equal rights, because what you're doing is what the original feminists were fighting against. We did not fail because we went through a c-section the first time, nor are we bad parents because of it. If this time through we are faced with a similar situation, it will again be no reflection on the success or failure of the birth.

My wife found the book to be not only informative but a joy to read. The personal style, clear language, and tendency to speak to the reader as though she were an intelligent person were welcome and -- frankly -- all to rare in books like this. This book does the one thing right that is -- in my view -- the most important thing during pregnancy: provide the necessary information and support a woman needs for making the right decision for herself.
Rivik
I was looking for a book that would tell me more than just the politically correct viewpoint of c-sections, and I found it in this one. The information on recovery was particularly good. Even though it didn't cover the reason for my c-section (cord presentation), or what one of my best friends experienced during her delivery (vasa previa), I felt it did give me plenty of information about other reasons a c-section might be used.

Best of all, it didn't give the usual "sorry about that, honey....maybe next time you can have a VBAC and finally be a REAL woman" tone when it came to discussions about what could happen with subsequent births. That alone made it a must-read for anyone recovering from the procedure.
Jerinovir
I had a c-section with my first and am going to attempt a vbac this time. I thought the book had good information on what to expect in a c-section, why to have one and some good points. It is clear that they swing to the surgical birth side, but so what, there facts are correct and there are way more books out there that tote the no pain meds, natural birth process ect. So it is kind of good to have a book out there that stands up for women who have had to have c-sections. Because truthfully when you are in the hospital and faced with the decision, you don't have the time or mental capacities to sit there and ask 5000 questions, you just want a safe, healthy baby and that is what the book says too. It could go into vbacs more as they are becoming more popular and studies show that they are safe and can be successful and so on, but I don't think that is the authors goal.
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