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Nature Of The Child ePub download

by Jerome Kagan

  • Author: Jerome Kagan
  • ISBN: 0465048501
  • ISBN13: 978-0465048502
  • ePub: 1100 kb | FB2: 1281 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Psychology & Counseling
  • Publisher: Basic Books; First Edition edition (October 10, 1984)
  • Pages: 309
  • Rating: 4.1/5
  • Votes: 441
  • Format: lrf doc lit rtf
Nature Of The Child ePub download

In the epilogue to his "The Nature of the Child," psychologist Jerome Kagan writes that ".

In the epilogue to his "The Nature of the Child," psychologist Jerome Kagan writes that . .the central theme hidden in and between the chapters of this book is that the person's interpretation of experience is simultaneously the most significant product of an encounter and the spur to the next. These interpretations can be manifest as schemas-a schema is .a representation of experience that bears a relation to an original event" (categories, propositions, et.

The world-famous Harvard psychologist challenges many of psychology's most deeply held assumptions about human development-arguing, for example, that early experience does not inexorably shape our lives and that the influence of the family is more subtle than has been supposed.

Child psychology, Psicología infantil, Enfants, Kinderpsychologie, Entwicklung, Kind, Psychologie, Einführung, Child Development, Psychology, Child, Einführung, Kind, Entwicklung, Psychologie, Child Development, Psychology, Child. New York : Basic Books. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Tracey Gutierres on October 28, 2014. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

In 1984, Basic published Harvard developmental psychologist Jerome Kagan's The Nature of the Child, a book that challenged many of psychology's most deeply held assumptions about human development-arguing, for example, that early experience does not inexorably shape our lives and that.

In 1984, Basic published Harvard developmental psychologist Jerome Kagan's The Nature of the Child, a book that challenged many of psychology's most deeply held assumptions about human development-arguing, for example, that early experience does not inexorably shape our lives and that the influence of the family is more subtle than had been supposed-and that went. on to become a classic in its field. In The Possibility of a Child, Kagan offers a sweeping narrative of development that solidifies his place as one of the most influential thinkers in the field of psychology

Jerome Kagan is a Daniel and Amy Starch Professor of Psychology at.

Professor Kagan is the director of the Mind/Brain Behavior Interfaculty Initiative. His books include Galen’s Prophecy: Temperament in Human Nature and Three Seductive Ideas.

Jerome Kagan received his bachelor of science degree from Rutgers University in 1950 and the PhD . A summary of the project was published in a book, entitled Birth to Maturity, which won the Hofheimer Prize of the American Psychiatric Association

Jerome Kagan received his bachelor of science degree from Rutgers University in 1950 and the PhD from Yale University in 1954. A summary of the project was published in a book, entitled Birth to Maturity, which won the Hofheimer Prize of the American Psychiatric Association. Do you want to read the rest of this chapter? Request full-text.

He is one of the key pioneers of developmental psychology. Kagan has shown that an infant's "temperament" is quite stable over time, in that certain behaviors in infancy are predictive of certain other behavior patterns in adolescence.

Jerome Kagan is the Daniel and Amy Starch Professor of Psychology at Harvard University. His many books include Unstable Ideas, The Nature of the Child, and Infancy. Sharon Lamb is assistant professor of human development at Bryn Mawr College. Free E-book Of The Month.

The nature of the child. You must be logged in to Tag Records. The nature of the child, Jerome Kagan. The nature of the child, Jerome Kagan Basic Books New York 1984. Australian/Harvard Citation. 1984, The nature of the child, Jerome Kagan Basic Books New York. Book, Online - Google Books. New York : Basic Books, c1984 xvii, 309 p. ; 25 cm.

Jerome Kagan is Emeritus Professor of Psychology at Harvard University In this book, the distinguished psychologist Jerome Kagan describes five conditions that place serious constraints on the ability to predict mental or behavioral.

Jerome Kagan is Emeritus Professor of Psychology at Harvard University. He is the author of The Nature of the Child, An Argument for Mind, Psychology's Ghosts, The Human Spark, Five Constraints on Predicting Behavior (MIT Press), and other books. In this book, the distinguished psychologist Jerome Kagan describes five conditions that place serious constraints on the ability to predict mental or behavioral outcomes based on brain data: the setting in which evidence is gathered, the expectations of the subject, the source of the evidence that supports the conclusion, the absence of studies that examine patterns of causes with patterns of measures, and.

Essays discuss child development, infant behavior, stages of growth, moral standards, emotions, the cognitive process, and the role of the family
Gold as Heart
Written for someone with knowledge of clinical chil development good but for someone without the academic background
Onetarieva
In the epilogue to his "The Nature of the Child," psychologist Jerome Kagan writes that ". . .the central theme hidden in and between the chapters of this book is that the person's interpretation of experience is simultaneously the most significant product of an encounter and the spur to the next." These interpretations can be manifest as schemas--a schema is ". . .a representation of experience that bears a relation to an original event" (categories, propositions, etc.). There are implications here for continuity and change in the understanding that people have of themselves and their worlds. Kagan contends that biology (e.g., the maturation of the central nervous system) and experience shape the development of children's psychological qualities and cognition. As children move into adolescence, experience becomes the dominant force.

The interaction between biology and experience, Kagan insists, militates against the likelihood that the child's schemata and personal characteristics (e.g., aggressiveness) will have any necessary relationship to that child's adolescent and adult views. Put simply, early and middle childhood beliefs do not predict the views that an adult will hold. Biology provides one important part of the explanation. Biologists find that as one stage of development is left behind, its underlying structures may simply disappear and, hence, not be a part of new structures (e.g., certain sensory cells simply cease existence with the metamorphosis of the tadpole). Just so with psychological development.

To illustrate, Kagan takes "separation anxiety" among one-year olds. Many psychologists treat this as a harbinger of probable later adult problems. In Kagan's view, this anxiety may be temporarily adaptive, but has no necessary future function or importance. In a survey of longitudinal studies, Kagan reports that ". . .long-term preservation [of various psychological entities] is minimal until late childhood."

Admittedly, there does appear to be some continuity in psychological entities from late childhood (6 to 10 years of age), and, by itself, this would seem to be compatible with the primacy principle. Kagan explains the carryover in situational or structural--but not psychological--terms. That is, if the situations in which people find themselves remain reasonably constant as they move through the different stages of development, there is likely to be continuity. On the other hand, ". . .the evidence does imply that if the profiles created by early encounters are not supported by future and current environments, change is likely."

Available data are supportive of Kagan's analysis. One of the most dramatic instances of this concerns individuals' personalities, normally assumed to be resistant to alteration. Moss and Susman survey a series of longitudinal studies of personality development and, in line with Kagan's argument, find that "Consistency is most obvious for personality characteristics that are endowed with positive cultural and societal valences." Supporting situations account better for stability than some unchanging internal mechanism standing alone.

All in all, a well written and important book that raises questions about the extent to which one stage on our lives affects subsequent stages. Well worth looking at.
Authis
This is a book about psychological development. Here are the chapter titles, to give you a more specific idea: Guiding Themes in Human Development; The Infant; Connectedness; Establishing a Morality; The Emotions; The Generation of Thought; The Role of the Family.
Kagan is known for his work on temperamental shyness in infants. In this highly theoretical work (supported by evidence in many cases, but of course we don't know what counterevidence is going unmentioned) he critiques several generally accepted premises about psychological development. He argues that there is NOT a strong connectedness between the qualities a person has at early stages of development and the qualities he or she has at much later stages. He argues for the primacy of emotion over logic in our development. He notes in the preface that "It is not what parents do to children or siblings do to each other that matters, but rather the intention the child imputes to those who act on and with him or her."
Thought-provoking stuff even for us ordinary parents, not just professionals and academics, although the writing style is at times a little over the top. If you can tease out the point Kagan makes within each long paragraph, you'll find it worth discussing.
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