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Welcome to Your Crisis: How to Use the Power of Crisis to Create the Life You Want ePub download

by Laura Day

  • Author: Laura Day
  • ISBN: 031616724X
  • ISBN13: 978-0316167246
  • ePub: 1538 kb | FB2: 1463 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Mental Health
  • Publisher: Little, Brown and Company (January 4, 2007)
  • Pages: 288
  • Rating: 4.8/5
  • Votes: 447
  • Format: lrf mobi txt rtf
Welcome to Your Crisis: How to Use the Power of Crisis to Create the Life You Want ePub download

view Kindle eBook view Audible audiobook. 10 Originally published in 2006, Welcome to Your Crisis is a practical book to face your life crises, or the crisis you are facing right now, and get out in the best possible way. Crisis is presented as a cathartic catalyst for positive transformation.

Laura Day identifies several types of reactions to crisis, people may respond with denial, anxiety, rage, or depression. She tells listeners how to rethink each response, and she gives practical and personalized tools for turning the lowest times of life into life's greatest gift

Laura Day identifies several types of reactions to crisis, people may respond with denial, anxiety, rage, or depression. She tells listeners how to rethink each response, and she gives practical and personalized tools for turning the lowest times of life into life's greatest gift. Through the exercises, rituals, and activities Day prescribes, listeners can learn the best practices for rebuilding a more meaningful life. Getting through crisis is part acceptance, part reinvention, and this book provides invaluable lessons for closing one life chapter and beginning the next

In this inspirational new book, Laura Day identifies crisis as the most authentic version of self-transformation.

In this inspirational new book, Laura Day identifies crisis as the most authentic version of self-transformation. It’s a great read to help identify crisis’ in the making and hope to cope and solve them. Originally published at tomvranas.

Welcome to Your Crisis book. Every decade they seem to have reinvented themselves and their lives

Welcome to Your Crisis book. Every decade they seem to have reinvented themselves and their lives. They do not fear crisis because they live their dreams, realizing that any difficulties they encounter lead to successful new beginnings. Crisis To Do List: 1. Act as if you have power in this situation, even if you don't feel that this is true right now. 2. Focus on the present. Your only power is in the present. You cannot change the past and it is a waste of time to extend your crisis into a future that isn't here yet. Stay focused on the present.

In this inspirational new book, Laura Day identifies crisis as the most authentic versionof self-transformation. She identifies several"crisis types"-those who respond tocrisis with denial, with anxiety, with rage or withdepression-and tells readers how to rethink eachresponse. She gives practical and personalized tools forturning our darkest times into life's greatestgift. As Laura Day says, rock bottom can be the best placeto start.

How to Use the Power of Crisis to Create the Life You Want. Publishers weekly feb 20, 2006. Publisher Description. Crisis is inevitable, but Day (Practical Intuition), a self-described "intuitive healer" and "beacon for people in crisis," believes crisis can be a catalyst for change. She relates her own tragedies: her mother committed suicide when Day was 14; years later, her marriage ended, leaving Day impoverished and with a newborn son to raise.

Laura Day, (born March 22, 1959) is the author of several self-help books, focusing on intuition

Laura Day, (born March 22, 1959) is the author of several self-help books, focusing on intuition. She also gives financial advice as an "intuitionist". She resides in New York City She speaks regularly both in the . and abroad, and has appeared on CNN, Fox News, Good Morning America, The View and The Oprah Winfrey Show.

Who are you? -. - Is your life in crisis? -. - Your new life awaits, so long as you give up your old - How do you respond to change? -. - A whole new world : taking your first steps - Find ways to treat yourself - Avoiding the three death traps . . - A whole new world : taking your first steps - Find ways to treat yourself - Avoiding the three death traps : rumination, recrimination, and retribution - Rewriting your personal mythology - Deciding who you want to be - Reconnecting with your original self - Sharing the blessings - No life is crisis proof, but any life can. Be less crisis prone.

Welcome to Your Crisis: How to Use the Power of Crisis to Create the Life You Want by Laura Da. If you’re into what your gut tells you, read on! Day gives practical tools for turning your darkest times into powerful transformation.

Welcome to Your Crisis: How to Use the Power of Crisis to Create the Life You Want by Laura Day. If you don’t believe much in your own intuition, you can skip this one. You Are a Badass: How to Stop Doubting Your Greatness and Start Living an Awesome Life by Jen Sincero. If I could only recommend one book to you, this would be it. This book will make you feel ready to take on the world, and smash your baggage in the process. She identifies several crisis types -those who respond to crisis with denial, with anxiety, with rage or with depression-and tells readers how to rethink each response. She gives practical and personalized tools for turning our darkest times into life's greatest gift. As Laura Day says, rock bottom can be the best place to start. Manufacturer: Little, Brown and Company Release date: 4 January 2007 ISBN-10 : 031616724X ISBN-13: 9780316167246.

In this inspirational new book,Laura Day identifies crisis as the most authentic versionof self-transformation. She identifies severalldquo;crisis typesrdquo;-those who respond tocrisis with denial, with anxiety, with rage or withdepression-and tells readers how to rethink eachresponse. She gives practical and personalized tools forturning our darkest times into lifersquo;s greatestgift.As Laura Day says, rock bottom can be the best placeto start.
Kabei
7.5/10
Originally published in 2006, Welcome to Your Crisis is a practical book to face your life crises, or the crisis you are facing right now, and get out in the best possible way. Crisis is presented as a cathartic catalyst for positive transformation. Day links some aspects of her "methodology" to the work of Hans Selye in the field of Stress, that of Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi in the field of Optimal Human Functioning, and that sociologist Charles Fritz in the field of Human Behaviour during disasters. However, a good deal of her advice can be tracked back to basic Jungian psychoanalysis, positive thinking, behavioural psychology, and classic literature on the subconscious. If you are familiar with those subjects, some of the things Day mentions in this book will be a déjà-vue.

THINGS I LIKED
~~ The book has an absence of New Age spirituality and mumbo-jumbo that I find very refreshing! Good for people of all religions or without religion.
~~ Day re-frames crisis, gives it a positive halo, and sheds light on it, so that we can overcome it. Every cloud ha a silver lining!
~~ Her insistence on focusing on the present, which pervades all the book, is really helpful and I have experienced to be very helpful. You need to be present not to get lost in the past or the future, need to be present to acknowledge and honour your feelings, need to be present not to get ruminating in your head or your blood boiling after what you did or was done to you. Focusing on the now gives you the perfect frame of mind to go through the basics you need to take care of for your life to function.
~~ Throughout the book, Day insists on asking ourselves "Who Am I?" Not a new question or exercise but especially relevant in moments of crisis because, when we are in crisis, our sense of self is also in crisis, even threatened. We need to look inside and see the "whos" in the "I", and discover and uncover what lies beneath the "self" that is defined by profession, gender, marital status, race, nationality, age and religion. The rescue of the primitive or real self, your inner golden "I", is what we should be looking for in a crisis, so that we can bring it out and make it more fully present, honour it, and follow its path. I found the consideration of the "I" as an ecosystem or a "community" really true, and something that deeply resonates with me.
~~ I found chapter 8 on the personal mythology one of the most helpful to me. You can find your personal mythology in the story you tell about yourself, how others see you, how you were seen when you were a child, and the family history that was passed on to you. This mythology hides an internal process that we believe keeps us safe, hides a core fear and a core desire. If we are in crisis our myth is not working and needs to be changed so the core desire is at the top of our myth and not buried by it: "You are not your story. In fact your story is inaccurate, subjective, and— unless it is helping you achieve— superfluous. You are your choices. Your story does not dictate your life— your choices do." (loc. 1725-1728).
~~ Laura doesn't think her tools make miracles, but she's sure they will help us without a doubt. She even says that we don't need to believe that something works, because when things work, they do work disregarding whether we believe it or not. I think that sort of comment is very good for sceptics. The message is, give it a try and see what happens.
~~ I especially liked her reflection on rumination ("the mind voyage of woulda, shoulda, coulda, what if, and if only.") Laura advises different things and exercises to face the present and the future, and not to linger in the past. Most of the advise resonates with me.
~~ There are many exercises in the book, but some of my favourites are The superhero, Packing your trunk, Consulting our inner guide, and attracting your future. Your fav ones might be others.

THINGS THAT DIDN'T RESONATE WITH ME
~~ Day says the same, with different words, quite often. Basically, it sums up as, your crisis might be the best thing ever happened to you as something good or better will come out of it.
~~ Days classifies people in four main types based on four main knee-jerk sort of reactions to crisis: anxiety type, denial type, rage type and depression type. Generally speaking, there is truth in which she says and advises, but these four types are very simplistic! People don't react always the same, as reactions depend not only of our character and temperament, but also on the circumstances, level of maturity and inner growth we have. In my personal experience, crisis elicits different and multiple reactions in the same people. If a love one dies I might get depressed, but that doesn't mean I am depressive. If am unfairly dismissed by my employer, I might get a mix of rage, anxiety and depression all together or a succession of emotional stages. Ditto, but in a different order, after a break-up. We cannot be described by our reactions unless we react in the same way always. I think if we are part of a type, the type has to be more flexible and elaborate and take more variables into account. I quite like the Jungian type system best. Much of the advice Day gives relates to her four types classification so, unfortunately, the advice is also simplistic and not always helpful.
~~ There are basic strong differences in the ways introverts and extroverts deal with life, success and crisis. Laura Day confesses that she's an introvert, but then she gives many items of advice that involve calling your many friends, joining groups, being social, having people over. Really, introverts don't have a liking for groups, meetings or for relating to several people at the same time. Most introverts have a very small number of very close friends and they relate to them individually. Personally, dealing with my personal stuff with a group of people would be excruciating, no matter how lovely my friends are! Having any sort of gathering at home that involves more than two people would be something stressful and non-enjoyable. Joining a group out there that supports people in my circumstances can be helpful, but it demands a lot of mental and emotional effort from an introvert because groups per se don't ever resonate with most introverts.
~~ At times, Laura recommends asking a good friend to define or describe us. Of course, the support and advice of your friends is important, but asking your friends to define you is not always a wise thing to do. People's projections are always there, and a friend might define me according to his/her own projections. Besides, some friends will never be able to tell you the truth just because they want to protect you, or don't have the guts to be fully honest with you, or they care very much about the relationship and don't want to put it in jeopardy by something they say. I think that getting to know our shadow, getting to know ourselves, BS free of course, will give us better answers than most friends would. For example, not long ago, when talking to a dear friend, I mentioned about my being an introvert, and he laughed and commented sarcastically, "yes sure, soooo introvert." Well, I am an introvert by the book. He can't see it because he projects his extroversion onto me all the time. Why would I ask him to describe me if he doesn't even get the most obvious essential thing about me and has known me for years?! Also, I don't want to be defined by what other people think I am!
~~ Laura Day reminds us of the many crisis we have survived and we are still here and that the same will happen to us right now. Well, that is a psychological cognitive bias she is applying. Optimism bias?

I AGREE BUT NOT FULLY
Day says that the three "Rs" (rumination, recrimination, and retribution) divert our attention from where it should be, the present and future, not the past, and divert our energy from the centre, our centre. I agree with that. The solutions Day offers to overcome the 3 Rs are the 3 Fs (Forgetfulness, forgiveness and Faith-Fullness). However, I don't agree with Day that we need to forgive, forget or to forget vendetta to move on. We can move on without doing that. Said differently, unless you are obsessed about somebody or something, and this obsession is consuming you, you just need to move on.

Re forgiveness, we don't need to forgive anybody to move on. We need to focus on with our life, focus on moving forward, on surrounding ourselfs with the right people, do things that make us happy, extricate ourselves from the source of pain if possible, limit or severe contact with those who hurt us , move away, change city or suburb, or job. When our thoughts fill up with the painful memory, we need to think about other things or people, make a conscious decision to replace those painful thoughts with others that fill our heart. If we do that, constantly, we will eventually come to surprise ourselves, and think quite neutrally about those who harmed us. I believe that forgiveness is something that people should earn, not a free gift we have to distribute as super-bowl tickets to jerks who used, abused and harmed you fully aware of their actions. Otherwise, I don't see the problem. We are all human.

Re recrimination ("the desire to be made whole by the act of a just outcome"). I agree that vendetta is best served in a cold plate, but of course I want vendetta. I want the Universe to punish those people who did harm to me, especially those who did so on purpose, and were aware of the damage they were causing, that were fully aware that their actions weren't ethical or moral. I will be celebrating when they get what they deserve, Martini in hand. I don't obsess about this, I just hope to see the boomerang effect effectuated before I die. They idea of the Universe punishing them makes me move on faster, believe it or not. I don't feel the urge to kill anybody, but I will celebrate their fall when the moment arrives, if they deserve it .

THINGS I MISSED
~~ Laura Day is a brilliant intuitive. This being the case, I was expecting some specific exercises or information on how intuition can help us specifically in our crisis. She mentions many times that intuition is a guidance when we are in crisis. Well, why not giving specific information about how to access intuition when we are in crisis and blocked?
~~ Although I liked the book and what Day says, and some of the tools she gives, I missed a bit of a more structure and cohesive system. For example, once we have read the book and done the exercises, do we do them again? How long should we do the exercises? A year, every week, every day? In which order? Can we do some of them and not others? In the order they are mentioned in the book or in another? All of them or just those we like? That sort of very simple but practical info was missing most of the time.

RENDERING FOR KINDLE
The book is quite well edited with barely any typo. Something I never take for granted in Kindle! So, that is always a big thumbs up for me. However, I find irritating that the index of chapters in the side menu and at the beginning of the book has not titles, just numbers. I mean, how difficult and how much work would have taken the editor to link the title of the chapter with the number of the chapter? Little!

IN SHORT
This is good overall lift-me up sort of book, well written, with some exercises to stop, ponder and answer to yourself. This is a general book on crisis, so if you are going through serious illness, a nasty divorce, somebody dear to you has died, you have just filled for bankruptcy, or have tricked by a contract and made redundant without any severance and found homeless, well I would be looking for specific books that focus on these or individual subjects. To me, the best part of the book are the last three or four chapters, as they offer, perhaps, the best advice, exercises and introspection, or at least those that resonated more with me. It could be differently for any other person, of course.
Adokelv
I ordered Crisis,"How to Rule the World from Your Couch" and "Practical Intuition for Success: Let Your Interests Guide You To the Career of Your Dreams" all at once, after a scathing annual review with my boss. The aspect of my review that I had trouble coping with were the personal assaults and improvement plan/termination date (which I wasn't fully aware of until 4 weeks later). I've been getting back on anti-depression meds, so what would normally be handled with a margarita and bitch session felt 100% worse. I was being scrutinized by the boss and constantly felt anxious & extra depressed was staying away from coworkers to avoid being watched.

The Crisis book (1st I've read) has been a lifesaver. It has taught me to separate myself from situations, but not withdraw. Almost observe and then participate, so I won't be so sensitive to minutia. This has made my remaining 9-5 much more manageable. She focuses on moving forward with your life and not pointing fingers toward blame and resentment. She offers lessons on how because we all know it's not easy to get up one day and change w/o a little help. My own "crisis" isn't over but w/o her directions I know it would have been harder to navigate the waters.

Her advice is good because it's practical, teaches you how to listen to yourself and actions you need to take to improve your situation(s) moving forward. I have read numerous self help books and I've been turned off by the ones that encourage "getting up with a smile", "go exercise", "buy a new outfit". Laura Day understands that when you are depressed and feel then need to spend your weekend asleep for safety, solace and tranquility it's fine, but professional help is still recommended. My book is dog eared and covered in stickers. I love it and it is one I will always cherish and never Kindle :)
Qumen
I am a long time fan of Laura Day and her books. I have always found The Circle to be an amazing work of wisdom. It is a clear, useful, and proven to me example of the power of positive, forward thinking. If you follow the steps; you cannot fail to accomplish your goals and claim your own power.

This book is a perfect companion to The Circle! And in someways it surpasses it. I found Welcome To Your Crisis to be a very clear and thoughtful guide to turning your life around. Simply put, it is magnificent!

I read it from beginning to end in just two sittings. That's how accessible it is. Now of course, I must go back and take the clearly drawn steps, one by one. Laura uses her own life as example making it part autobiography. This structure at once draws you into her personal account, making what she is teaching resonate powerfully. All of the examples shown throughout the book of people she has helped or known, are powerul examples of how we can all better our own situations and must never give up.

Whether or not you are currently in crisis, you have been at some point or other, and you will most assuredly be again. This book will give you the tools for the future by explaining to you how you dealt with your former crisis, and will help guide you out of your current one if that is the case.

Every one should read this book for helpful illumination, and while you're at it, buy one or two extras to keep on hand to give to friends. This is a friendly book, giving it to someone would be a loving act.
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