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Send in the Idiots: Or How We Grew to Understand the World ePub download

by Kamran Nazeer

  • Author: Kamran Nazeer
  • ISBN: 0747579105
  • ISBN13: 978-0747579106
  • ePub: 1238 kb | FB2: 1882 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Children's Health
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing PLC; 1st edition (March 6, 2006)
  • Pages: 240
  • Rating: 4.6/5
  • Votes: 821
  • Format: txt doc lit doc
Send in the Idiots: Or How We Grew to Understand the World ePub download

Kamran Nazeer with high functioning autism, writes about his journey to seek out people that he went to a "special school for . Ultimately, a great quick read for anyone looking to understand what an autistic experience is like.

Kamran Nazeer with high functioning autism, writes about his journey to seek out people that he went to a "special school for children with autism" with during his childhood. He seeks to find out what happened to them and how they have fared since and to compare his own progress. He only manages to track down a mere handful before his trip and so the book is divided into sections of their respective histories and current lifestyles. Like all conditions or diagnoses, there is no one narrative, and this book highlights a few high functioning adults with autism with uncanny insight.

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When he was four years old Kamran Nazeer was enrolled in a small school in New York alongside other children diagnosed with autism. Here they received care that was at the cutting edge of developmental psychology. Kamran is now a policy adviser in Whitehall - but what of the others? With rare perception.

Send in the Idiots, or How We Grew to Understand the World by Kamran Nazeer Bloomsbury, 230 pp, £1. 9, March . We understand his need to have everything just so and we know he has trouble playing with other children. 9, March 2006, ISBN 0 5. Autism is devastating – to the family. Children can be born with all manner of problems. It’s a shame we cannot take him out much, because he gets disturbed and people don’t understand. But his grandparents adore him. He will learn to talk quite soon. Kamran is now a policy adviser in Whitehall - but what of the others?

To all appearances, Kamran Nazeer is a confident young man to whom . Nazeer will have none of this.

To all appearances, Kamran Nazeer is a confident young man to whom success has come easily. Having spent his childhood in America and Scotland, he took a doctorate at Cambridge, lived in Pakistan and Saudi Arabia, and has now become a high-powered Whitehall civil servant. Autistic people simply have exceptional difficulty dealing with the chaos and unpredictability of the world, and for that reason they have to develop little routines that generate havens of "local coherence" where they can feel at home. The teachers in that little school in New York knew how to nurture these havens - until funding ran out and it closed. Kamran is now a policy adviser in Whitehall – but what of the others? With rare perception, he tells of their lives: the speechwriter unable to make eye contact, the courier who gets upset if anyone touches his bicycle, the suicidal depressive, and the computer engineer who communicates difficult emotions through the use of hand puppets.

In 1982, at age four, Kamran Nazeer was enrolled in a small school in New York City alongside a dozen other children diagnosed with autism. Calling themselves the Idiots, these kids received care that was at the cutting edge of developmental psychology

In 1982, at age four, Kamran Nazeer was enrolled in a small school in New York City alongside a dozen other children diagnosed with autism. Calling themselves the Idiots, these kids received care that was at the cutting edge of developmental psychology. Kamran visits four of his old classmates to find out the kind of lives that they are living now, how much they've been able to overcome and what remains missing

book by Kamran Nazeer. Since we have a grandchild with ASD, it provided me(us) with an excellent inside and helped me(us) to understand the hurdles which confront children with ASD. I sincerely hope that Kamran Nazeer will continue to inform the world about this problem - he already has established himself as a great asset to help find methods which will deal with and asist autistic persons.

Send in the Idiots - Kamran Nazeer. The Idiots were never deployed but Ms. Russell finally accepted defeat. We form our views of ourselves, as well as our views about the world, in conversation with others

Send in the Idiots - Kamran Nazeer. Ms. Russell stopped reading newspapers in 1982. There was no room left in her day for reading the newspaper. We form our views of ourselves, as well as our views about the world, in conversation with others.

In 1982, when he was four years old, Kamran Nazeer was enrolled in a small school in New York City alongside a dozen other children diagnosed with autism. Calling themselves the Idiots, these kids received care that was at the cutting edge of developmental psychology. Twenty-three years later, the school no longer exists. Send in the Idiots is the always candid, often surprising and ultimately moving investigation into what happened to those children. Now a policy adviser in Westminster, Kamran decides to visit four of his old classmates to find out the kind of lives that they are living now, how much they've been able to overcome - and what remains missing. A speechwriter unable to make eye contact; a messenger who gets upset if anyone touches his bicycle; a depressive suicide victim; and a computer engineer who communicates difficult emotions through the use of hand puppets: these four classmates reveal an astonishing, thought-provoking spectrum of behaviour. Bringing to life the texture of autistic lives and the pressures and limitations that the condition presents, Kamran also relates the ways in which those can be eased over time, and with the right treatment. Using his own experiences to examine such topics as the difficulties of language, conversation as performance and the politics of civility, Send in the Idiots is also a rare and provocative exploration of the way that people - all people - learn to think and feel. Written with unmatched insight and striking personal testimony, Kamran Nazeer's account is a stunning, invaluable and utterly unique contribution to the literature of what makes us human.
Dibei
This book is a gift. It provides insight into the minds of those on the autism spectrum. Nazeer offers sharp and funny and poignant stories from his childhood and of his fellow students that capture the alternative reality, the sometimes painful differentness that autistic/Asperger's people experience. As a mother of a daughter with Asperger's, this book offered me a glimpse into her psyche that I hadn't had before. The book explodes the stereotype that people on the autism spectrum are stuck; that there is no movement, no growth, no progression, no change. This book also explodes the stereotype that the ridicule, and the loneliness, and the isolation of autism doesn't hurt - that autistic people don't feel - that they cannot be depressed, sad, suicidal. The story of Elizabeth is especially sad. I wonder if it is particularly hard to be female and autistic - the expectation that females be sensitive and empathic - it must be especially hard to not fit into that mold. I highly recommend this book to anyone who has ever encountered autism, or loved someone on the autistic spectrum.
Vizil
Very warm, interesting book about a man's experience growing up in special education and the other students he knew. It was touching to read his contacts with his former peers and inspiring to read how well he's done in his life.
Clandratha
Autism is a world like no other. My child was diagnosed at the age of 19 months and we have been living in that world for 3 1/2 years. I felt this book was a very interesting and insightful view to the 'inside' of Autism. I have spent these years trying (and succeeding) at understanding my own child's mind. When I could not find materials to help educate her, I made them myself. I proactively worked at educating my child. I have a website [...] where I have made available items that have successfully helped my child and other children with Autism.

Understanding your child's mind is a wonderful tool for helping them. This was a good book to read and fast-reading book. I also gave me hope for my own child's quirky ways.
Adoranin
great read!
Cktiell
This book was an eye-opener for me. Since we have a grandchild with ASD, it provided me(us) with an excellent inside and helped me(us) to understand the hurdles which confront children with ASD.

I sincerely hope that Kamran Nazeer will continue to inform the world about this problem -- he already has established himself as a great asset to help find methods which will deal with and asist autistic persons.
Iaran
I have two children with autism and found this book to be very interesting regarding behaviors and how as adults the subjects lived. However the writing gets a little wordy. The author goes on in detail, for instance, on communication problems. Of course you have to remember that the author has autism himself, which makes me understand his need to go into detail. Still you can speed read over the parts in detail and the actual people are very interesting. I could see my children in some of the subjects and it helped me to understand them a little better.
Fhois
Fasinating view of autism from someone who lives it. Multiple outcomes reported from the same viewpoint. Powerful read for those who live with/ work with peolpe on the spectrum.
I wasn't expecting a political rant in the book but other than that it was rather informative and I liked it for that
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