» » Essential Silver Surfer Vol.1: Silver Surfer #1-18 Fantastic Four Annual #5 (v. 1)

Essential Silver Surfer Vol.1: Silver Surfer #1-18 Fantastic Four Annual #5 (v. 1) ePub download

by Stan Lee

  • Author: Stan Lee
  • ISBN: 1904159567
  • ISBN13: 978-1904159568
  • ePub: 1928 kb | FB2: 1474 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Graphic Novels
  • Publisher: Panini Books (May 10, 2004)
  • Pages: 528
  • Rating: 4.3/5
  • Votes: 289
  • Format: lrf lrf txt mbr
Essential Silver Surfer Vol.1: Silver Surfer #1-18  Fantastic Four Annual #5 (v. 1) ePub download

Back to title selection : Comics S : Silver Surfer Vol 1. Categories: Comics S. Comic Lists.

Back to title selection : Comics S : Silver Surfer Vol 1. August 1968 Volume Debut. Silver Surfer Comic Books.

Gathering material from Silver Surfer 1-18 and Fantastic Four Annual 5, ESSENTIAL SILVER SURFER VO. Writer Stan Lee made a career out of melodramatic dialogue and soulful, often troubled heroes, but Lee's purple prose is perfectly suited for the Silver Surfer.

Gathering material from Silver Surfer 1-18 and Fantastic Four Annual 5, ESSENTIAL SILVER SURFER VOL. I re-presents some of the finest tales to come out of the early 70. A dreamer by nature, tormented by the memory of his beloved Shalla Bal and spurned by the Earthlings whom he has been banished to live amongst, the Silver Surfer is one of the most noble and introspective of all comic book characters, and Lee's poignant scripts make him one of the most empathetic as well.

The Silver Surfer : The Ultimate Cosmic Experience by Stan Lee, Jack Kirby, and Joe Sinnott was published in September . Silver Surfer Omnibus collects Silver Surfer Fantastic Four Annual and Not Brand Echh 576 pages, hardcover, June 2007, ISBN 0-7851-2753-4.

The Silver Surfer : The Ultimate Cosmic Experience by Stan Lee, Jack Kirby, and Joe Sinnott was published in September 1978 as part of the Marvel Fireside Books series and is considered to be one of the first true "graphic novels. The third volume series ran from 1987 to 1999 for 146 regular issues, as well as an issue number "−1", and nine annuals, making it the longest-running volume of Silver Surfer.

The Silver Surfer is now trapped on Earth after rebelling against Galactus. He tries to help the human race, but they all fear him and attack him. He recalls his former life as Norrin Radd. It seems no matter what he will be discontent with his surroundings. Please do NOT spoil content of NEXT issues.

Essential Silver Surfer book.

By (author) Stan Lee, Illustrated by John Buscema, Illustrated by Jack Kirby.

SILVER SURFER V2 Galactus Fantastic Four Mephisto 1982 LEE BYRNE CGC . Customs services and international tracking provided. Fantastic four cgc . ss signed stan lee 1ST silver surfer.

Essential Silver Surfer. Essential Silver Surfer.

Silver Surfer or The Silver Surfer, is the title of several series of comic . Stan Lee wrote all 18 issues of The Silver Surfer, beginning in 1968.

Silver Surfer or The Silver Surfer, is the title of several series of comic books published by Marvel Comics featuring the Silver Surfer. He later wrote many of the character's subsequent appearances, including the first Silver Surfer graphic novel in 1978 (published by Simon & Schuster). Volume 1 collects Silver Surfer and Fantastic Four Annual 528 pages, softcover, February 1998, Volume 2 collects Silver Surfer vol. 2 Silver Surfer vol. 3 Silver Surfer Annual and Marvel Fanfare 600 pages, softcover, June 2007, Marvel Masterworks: The Silver Surfer.

Witness the birth of the Sentinel of the Spaceways, as humanoid being Norrin Radd becomes the Silver Surfer - Galactus' first cosmic-powered herald and one of Marvel's most noble heroes! Collects Silver Surfer #1-18; Fantastic Four Annual #5. All-new edition!
Tcaruieb
I did not grow up in the era that these comics came out in and my exposure to Silver Surfer is from more recent attempts such as movies and a cartoon. So, I lack the nostalgia that generally goes with this sort of purchase.

I did enjoy this, for the most part. I got through about 3/4 of the book before I had to walk away from it. Not because of the art, the art is great, even in black and white...although some of the more soap opera woe-is-me stances got a bit old at times. The stories were also pretty good and I liked the little interweaving of discrimination/social commentary that made its way in from time to time. What did it in for me was the writing itself. To me, it was poetic to the point of feeling cheesy. Had it only been the Surfer's dialogue I probably would have been okay with it, but it was everyone who spoke more than a few sentences. Should this be a deal breaker? Absolutely not, it's just not my cup of tea, but it may not bother you nearly as much. Was it worth it? Yes, I don't feel like I wasted my money. It is a THICK book and 3/4 of it was still worth the price tag.
Mysterious Wrench
One of the comic universe's great tragic heroes, the Silver Surfer has inspired some of the medium's best science-fiction sagas, and several of them are in this volume. Gathering material from Silver Surfer 1-18 and Fantastic Four Annual 5, ESSENTIAL SILVER SURFER VOL. I re-presents some of the finest tales to come out of the early 70s. The origin story is moving and powerful, and sets the tone for the rest of the volume. Some of the stories are classics, particularly "The Power and the Prize" from Silver Surfer #3, in which the diabolic Mephisto is introduced for the first time. Other standouts include "Worlds Without End" and "The Heir of Frankenstein," but none of the tales are less than above-average and most of them are very good or excellent. Writer Stan Lee made a career out of melodramatic dialogue and soulful, often troubled heroes, but Lee's purple prose is perfectly suited for the Silver Surfer. A dreamer by nature, tormented by the memory of his beloved Shalla Bal and spurned by the Earthlings whom he has been banished to live amongst, the Silver Surfer is one of the most noble and introspective of all comic book characters, and Lee's poignant scripts make him one of the most empathetic as well. Most of this volume's stories are illustrated by John Buscema, with a couple by co-creator Jack Kirby thrown in for good measure. Both men are excellent artists, and both infuse the Surfer with pathos and power alike.

As with all of the Marvel Essentials books, the original contents are reprinted in black and white. Though this does deplete the otherwise beautiful artwork of some of its grandeur, the sheer quantity of great material makes most of the Eseentials great value. And this one is one of the best.
Ffleg
When the Silver Surfer was given his own comic book, a bi-monthly oversized title, there was a rather significant retooling of the character. When the Silver Surfer first came to earth in "Fantastic Four" #48 he was the herald of Galactus, zipping around the universe finding planets for his master to eat. After his first battle with the F.F. the Surfer encounters the blind Alicia Masters who hears a certain nobility in his voice. However, the Surfer declares that "nobility" has no meaning for him. Alicia, who has never sensed "such unimaginable loneliness in a living being," convinces the Surfer to challenge Galactus, who is defeated. But for effrontery Galactus removes the Surfer's space-time powers. The surfer will roam the galaxy no more.
Stan Lee and John Buscema reintroduced the Surfer by revealing his origin in the first issue and for the first time we learned of how Norrin Radd had lived a troubled life on the planet Zenn-La, with his beloved, Shalla Bal. The planet had lived in peace for generations and Radd despairs over the idea of paradise unearned. Then Galactus shows up and Zenn-La proves defenseless before his power. Norrin Radd flies to meet the invader and offers to be his herald, thereby solving the problem that Galactus eats inhabited worlds because he does not have the time to find planets where no intelligent life exists. Transformed into the Silver Surfer, Radd says a farewell to Shalla Bal and heads off on the path that will lead him to be exiled on Earth.
This origin makes some radical changes in the Surfer, because if you take this issue as gospel and apply it retroactively you have to wonder why the Surfer was no longer looking for planets without intelligent life when he landed on Earth (What about Mars? Venus? Jupiter? Or would Jupiter give Galactus gas?). But the main addition is the whole back-story of Norrin Radd, which adds another layer of tragedy to the Surfer being trapped on Earth. You also have John Buscema as the Surfer's artist, and while it might be heresy his version actually looks cooler than Jack Kirby's.
Including in "The Essential Silver Surfer, Volume 1" are the first eighteen issues of "The Silver Surfer" and a Lee and Kirby Surfer adventure form "Fantastic Four" Annual #5. In the mix are the Surfer's first encounter with Mephisto (#3), a battle with the Mighty Thor (#4), a brief reunion with Shalla Bal (#11), an encounter with Spider-Man (#14), a battle with the Human Torch (#15), and a two-part return engagement with Mephisto (#16-17), who ended up being the Silver Surfer's main enemy in these comics (Mephisto is behind the villains in issues #8-9 as well). Jack Kirby draws #18, where the Surfer fights the Inhumans.
There are a few less than stellar issues, such as the encounter with the Frankenstein monster (#7), but overall this is a good series, especially the early ones where the stories are 40-pages long and where the crossovers where more limited. Keeping the Surfer out of the mainstream Marvel Universe was one of the things that made him so special, which is why the longer this series went the less special he became. That is why Volume 1 is the one most worth having, even if these comics are reproduced in black & white (and why Volume 1 of the Marvel Masterworks series devoted to the Surfer which reprints the first six issues in color looks so attractive to fans of the character).
Zadora
There was always something about Marvel Comics which separated them from the pack, at least at the beginning. Whereas top competitor DC had cranked out superheroes for years, Marvel's heroes always seemed much more tangible, more human.
Much of this is due to Stan Lee's writing. While descending into self-parody later, one cannot help but feel a frisson in reading Lee's early stuff: the angst-ridden Spider-Man, the tumultuous Fantastic Four, the tortured Hulk. Lee made heroes and comics that teenagers could identify with.
And then he made the Silver Surfer.
The Surfer was a mass of contradictions: a peace-loving alien imbued with incredible power in the service of world-devouring Galactus; a faithful herald who betrayed his master; an intergalactic traveller confined to Earth. The Surfer was so over-the-top, it was hard for anyone to identify with him.
And yet we love him anyway. Why? Perhaps because the Surfer's alien naivete allows us to see the world anew. Or because Stan Lee's lofty prose finally seems to have found a suitable subject.
Either way, I guarantee you'll love this collection of early Silver Surfer tales. Excelsior!
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