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Lucifer Vol. 1: Devil in the Gateway ePub download

by Mike Carey

  • Author: Mike Carey
  • ISBN: 1563897334
  • ISBN13: 978-1563897337
  • ePub: 1719 kb | FB2: 1675 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Graphic Novels
  • Publisher: Vertigo (June 1, 2001)
  • Pages: 160
  • Rating: 4.6/5
  • Votes: 467
  • Format: doc docx lrf mobi
Lucifer Vol. 1: Devil in the Gateway ePub download

The first third of Vol. 1 follows Lucifer as he investigates the cause of the magickal phenomenon which is threatening . For example, in the second third of Vol. 1, Carey introduces the Basanos - very reminiscent of the medieval Tarot, but also very different and independent.

To investigate, he must visit a group of Lillim (Lilith's children, who believe they have the right of return to the Garden of Eden since they are not Adam or Eve's progeny, but Lilith's, and hence not subject to the ban); then he must take a young, disaffected woman on a spirit quest through Navaho mythology to end the source.

Lucifer, Vol. 1 book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Lucifer, Vol. 1: Devil in the Gateway as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Lucifer Vol. 1: Devil in the Gateway.

Mike Carey brings back Lucifer from the Sandman series for his own storyline complete with uncooperative angels . How do you build up, ehem, sympathy for the Devil? With a main character of such incredible skill and power, how do you put him in suspenceful situations

Mike Carey brings back Lucifer from the Sandman series for his own storyline complete with uncooperative angels, a girl who sees her best friend's ghost, a teen unsure of a unusual roadtrip with Morning Star and a tarot deck gone postal. How do you build up, ehem, sympathy for the Devil? With a main character of such incredible skill and power, how do you put him in suspenceful situations. Similarly, how do you get him out of those situations without it looking like a silly Deus Ex Machina?I've only read this first trade paperback of the series.

The Devil is in the Gateway, say Hello to hi. The series as well is strong enough to read stand alone, without Gaiman's Sandman, Mike Carey's writing is perfect. The first trade of the Lucifer series contains really 3 stories.

The Devil is in the Gateway, say Hello to him. 0. Lucifer: Devil in the Gateway - Vol. 1 by silkcuts on August 03, 2010. Lucifer Morningstar, maybe the only Neil Gaiman Sandman character strong enough to spin-off. For The Sandman fans who don't know what to read after Sandman, odds are if you liked or loved the Season of Mist book you'll love Lucifer's own series. The first trade of the Lucifer series contains really 3 stories

From the pages of THE SANDMAN, Lucifer Morningstar, the former Lord of Hell, is unexpectedly called back into action when he receives a mission from Heaven. Given free reign to use any means necessary, Lucifer is promised a prize of his own choosing if he fulfills this holy request.

From the pages of THE SANDMAN, Lucifer Morningstar, the former Lord of Hell, is unexpectedly called back into action when he receives a mission from Heaven. But once he completes his mission, the Prince of Darkness' demand shakes the foundation of Heaven and Hell. Now as his enemies unite to stop his reemergence, Lucifer gathers his forces as he prepares to launch his new revolution.

Items related to Lucifer Vol. Follows Lucifer Morningstar, the former Lord of Hell, as he faces challenges from forces in both heaven and hell

Items related to Lucifer Vol. Mike Carey Lucifer Vol. ISBN 13: 9781563897337. Lucifer Vol. Follows Lucifer Morningstar, the former Lord of Hell, as he faces challenges from forces in both heaven and hell.

Tags: Comic (1), Lucifer (1.

Authors : Mike Carey, Chris Weston. Product Category : Books. But managing a bar in LA has lost its charm, now the darkest star in the the city is back, and he wants to play God, literally. Titan Books LTD. ISBN-10. List Price (MSRP) : 1. 9. Read full description. See details and exclusions. See all 4 pre-owned listings.

Follows Lucifer Morningstar, the former Lord of Hell, as he faces challenges from forces in both heaven and hell.
Trex
Quick, if you haven't already done it, you need to read a synopsis of John Milton's "Paradise Lost" on Wikipedia - just the good parts about how John Milton, a goodly Christian, seemed to make the Adversary the hero of Paradise Lost. Or at least, the most interesting character.

Then, I highly recommend you not only read a little about William Blake's "The Marriage of Heaven and Hell" on Wikipedia, but actually invest the time in reading it (it is short, and available free on line). It will make up for all the poetry you were supposed to read, but didn't, in high school and perhaps college as well.

Or at least know that "Lucifer", the graphic novel, stands in a long tradition of literature that has literally turned the Bible on its head, and cast the traditional villain as the hero. Or at least, as the most interesting character.

Yet "Lucifer" is not blasphemous. It may well be heretical - I love the cross-mythological excursions into other cultural and religious beliefs - but it is not disrespectful of God, of Christ, or of the Bible. It is simply a religious noir thriller, and also, in some ways, follows in the tradition of Hollywood noir. I mean - Lucifer owns and operates a piano bar in Los Angeles? How appropriate, a bar named "Lux," or light, operated by the original (before his rebellion) angel of light, in a city called "the angels."

"Lucifer" doesn't merely cross over into other cultures and religions, it exhumes the Bible and Christian beliefs themselves - there are so many angels, and classes of angels, and did you know Adam had a wife before Eve, named Lilith? (This is apparently from 8th-10th century Jewish folklore, although a class of demons known as lilith existed in the Bible ... as did the mazikeen, which is the name of Lucifer's consort in the graphic novel, one of the daughters of Lilith.) I think Mike Carey must have spent a _lot_ of time in the library and raised a _lot_ of eyebrows by his choice of books. But you don't have to be a scholar of Jewish folklore, of comparative religions, or medieval theology (how many angels _can_ dance on the head of a pin?) to enjoy "Lucifer," any more than you need to know Magick to enjoy "Hellblazer".

Vol. 1 of "Lucifer" begins with a commission from the Most High to His most rebellious angel, which of course echoes the modern popular culture motif of fighting fire with fire, sending out the Dirty Dozen, or a gunfighter, or a rebel to restore the very order that the authority itself cannot restore - and in order to get Lucifer to "volunteer" an almost impossibly good deal is dangled in front of him, a deal which is so good that the angel delivering the message and the offer would rather have Lucifer reject.

The first third of Vol. 1 follows Lucifer as he investigates the cause of the magickal phenomenon which is threatening to unravel the very order of things. To investigate, he must visit a group of Lillim (Lilith's children, who believe they have the right of return to the Garden of Eden since they are not Adam or Eve's progeny, but Lilith's, and hence not subject to the ban); then he must take a young, disaffected woman on a spirit quest through Navaho mythology to end the source of the problem.

The story, told thusly, is simple; but the richness of character details, of humor, the level of WRITING is far beyond what we are used to seeing in graphic novels. You have to read (actually read, not skim) the text and look at the illustrations at least three or four times to begin to put it all together, it is so richly condensed. This is not bang bang, boom boom super hero action. It is a political story set in a richly magical, and religious, universe that we have not inhabited since before the age of technology. Nowadays we live on iPhones and computers and GPS tracks our whereabouts. There are no monsters left, only serial killers, and no aliens, only NASA on Mars. For a writer and some illustrators to create a literary "pocket universe" in which the technology and "normal life" exist, but overlaying that normal life and behind it are Biblical wars and intrigues of epic dimensions - that is an amazing accomplishment.

For example, in the second third of Vol. 1, Carey introduces the Basanos - very reminiscent of the medieval Tarot, but also very different and independent. A lesser writer would have used the traditional Tarot; Carey re-invents and repurposes it. The locale moves from Los Angeles (with cabaret and warehouse district) and New Mexico to the seamy nightlife of Hamburg. The mortals whose stories are backgrounds to Lucifer's larger mission are a female cabaret singer, a young gay Middle Easterner, and a neo Nazi longing for acceptance into a hate group. The divines are an angel whose singular self appointed task has been to write down, and save, everything written by any human thinker of any importance, and whose obsession has been to craft a fortune telling pack of cards whose characters literally take on a life of their own.

But wait - in between main story arcs, the angel left in charge of Hell sells off Lucifer's wings to an Easterner in exchange for a batch of human souls from the Easterner's hell. Not that the angel would do anything to hurt Lucifer, but the opportunity to bring more souls into his Hell is simply too appealing. Those wings will become quite important in Vol. 2 - and are a good example of _nothing_ being just a side story or "throw away" in Carey's meticulously plotted wheels within wheels "Lucifer" series. Unlike "Hellblazer" with has multiple story arcs, "Lucifer" is really designed as a limited run series - it has a beginning, middle, and end, and while there are side stories an supporting stories, it all fits together over the course of the series.

For example, the THIRD story arc in Lucifer seems like one of those "throw away" stories unrelated to the plot line. Far from it. The little girl introduced in that story, Elaine, takes on quite important dimensions later in the series.

I have to confess that I first bought 3 vols. of Lucifer in 2005 but didn't give them the attention they deserved. I was put off by the title - I still have some of that old fear of fire and brimstone in me. But this is literature, not a celebration of evil by any stretch of the imagination, and the greatest risk to your "soul" in reading these is Free Thinking. Your morals are in more danger from our current obsession with serial killers and from books like Silence of the Lambs, than from this series, which simply posits that most of the Bible is true, then overlays that assumption with "and what if other religions and folklore are also true" and then weaves an amazing story focused on what appears to be the chief villain in our own beloved Bible. No horns or tail - just a tuxedo, pale blond hair and a deceivingly effete look (how beautifully angelic as an angel! how disturbing as the first among fallen!) along the lines of David Bowie/ Peter O'Toole (Michael Fassbinder can play him if "Lucifer, the Mini Series" ever comes out), instilled with all the wit and deviousness displayed by the Serpent from the Garden of Eden - yet, in one chilling and revealing moment at the end of Vol 3, _not_ a pet Terminator, as he displays all the cruelty one could ever fear ("you came into MY house without knocking, and then you prayed to HIM!") with no leavening compassion or mercy. He honors his word; but offers nothing more.

And by the way, did I mention that Mazikeen is surely one of the "hottest" femme fatales in literary fiction?
Iesha
It takes some arrogance, worthy of the Prince of Lies himself, to claim, as this book does, that the book is based on characters created by Neil Gaiman, Sam Kieth, and Mike Dringenberg. I would think that, at the very least, John Milton might have some prior claim on the creation of Lucifer, the fallen angel, but in the legal shenanigans of the comic world, what that claim is actually revealing is that this graphic novel is a spin-off from Gaiman's incredibly popular Sandman series. As such, it shares a lot in common with Gaiman's re-envisioning of mythology. In Sandman: Seasons of Mist, Lucifer resigned from his post in Hell, had his wings cut off by Dream, and "retired" to host a nightclub called Lux in a distorted reflection of Rick's from Casablanca, although in Lux, Lucifer plays his own piano. This book and series picks up where that left off, opening with a visit from an angel of the host to Lucifer to offer him a job for whatever price Lucifer will name. Thus begins the wheels-within-wheels that is the hallmark of this series.

In his introduction, Gaiman states that whenever another comic writer would ask him what he thought should spin-off from Sandman, he always told them "Lucifer," which is likely not what any of them wanted to hear, instead hoping for dream assignments (pun intentional) like Death, Desire or Destiny. But, as in most things relating to his comic, Gaiman was spot on. He had already covered the possibilities with the Endless, while Lucifer was the perfect protagonist: extremely flawed yet ultimately intriguing, charming and deadly, full of pride but also hubris. Lucifer is the character you don't want to like, but you can't help yourself from doing so because, unlike the throne of Heaven, Lucifer is much more like us. The Bible may say that man was created in God's image, but our personalities were grafted from Lucifer.

This collection has three main story arcs: "The Morningstar Option," where Lucifer fulfills a job for Heaven, and shows that he's a right bastard to any who doubted; "A Six Card Spread," in which Lucifer attempts to discover if his payment from Heaven has any strings attached that he wasn't aware of; and "Born with the DEAD," which seems ancilliary to the ongoing story, as it's about a young girl who tries to figure out how and why her best friend died with Lucifer showing up near the denounement to provide a favor which will put the girl in debt to him. There's a thread of story that weaves through these three, but, as in Gaiman's Sandman, it will take at least another three or four collections before you start to see the resulting weave that begins here.

Each arc has a different team of artists. I appreciated Scott Hampton's work on "The Morningstar Option" the most, because his art is both exact and yet abstract, almost dreamlike in its openness. The art by Weston and Hodgkins for "A Six Card Spread" is too realistic for a horror/fantasy comic, which works in this case by making some of the uglier parts of the story even uglier. "Born with the DEAD's" Pleece and Ormston ply a middle ground between realistic representation and a Marc Hempel-style abstraction. Their's is the kind of art that I don't like for its own sake, but works extremely well with the story.
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