Strongman ePub download

by Allan Gladfelter,Charles Soule

  • Author: Allan Gladfelter,Charles Soule
  • ISBN: 1593621523
  • ISBN13: 978-1593621520
  • ePub: 1392 kb | FB2: 1858 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Graphic Novels
  • Publisher: SLG Publishing (March 17, 2009)
  • Pages: 120
  • Rating: 4.5/5
  • Votes: 480
  • Format: txt azw docx mbr
Strongman ePub download

Charles Soule, though? Strongman is his first published comic and it’s so polished and good, you’d think he’d been .

Charles Soule, though? Strongman is his first published comic and it’s so polished and good, you’d think he’d been in comics for years! The only other non-superhero book of Soule’s I’ve read is Letter 44, but right away you can tell Strongman is worlds apart from that title. Allan Gladfelter’s art is wonderful – I loved the character designs for Tigre and his pals, and the opening few pages are creatively constructed and bursting outwards to the reader before settling down into the traditional comic panel structure.

Then "Strongman" is the book for you! Charles Soule takes a really straightforward story and incorporates elements of noir, superhero comics, mexican luchador wrestling and 60s pulp, resulting in a very fine comic. There was a lot to like here, from Tigre's retransformation into the unstoppable fighter he once was, to the depiction of luchadores as actual superheroes Do you like a main character you can identify with? Someone with flaws? a guy who can really dish it out, but also has a moral code?

Charles Soule (Author), Allan Gladfelter (Artist). Charles Soule is the Author of the Image Comics series 27.

Charles Soule (Author), Allan Gladfelter (Artist). Series: Strongman (Book 2).

See if your friends have read any of Allan Gladfelter's books. Allan Gladfelter’s Followers. None yet. Allan Gladfelter. Allan Gladfelter’s books. Strongman by. Allan Gladfelter, Charles Soule (Goodreads Author).

by Allan Gladfelter and Charles Soule.

Tigre, a masked Mexican wrestler and crime-fighting movie star, was huge in Mexico in the 1970's. by Allan Gladfelter and Charles Soule.

The things that Charles Soule is describing in that statement could be anything.

Strongman by Charles Soule and Alan Gladfelter. The strongman in this case is Tigre, a worn-down Lucha Libre wrestler. He was big the 1970s, but life has been tough ever since. A plea from a woman to fight organ traffickers in Spanish Harlem, though, gives him one last shot at redemption. Kind of like The Wrestler, if Mickey Rourke wore a mask and, um, fought organ traffickers in Spanish Harlem. Check out the trailer below: Stitch by Tommy Kovac, creator of Skelebunnies and Autumn, also published by SLG, and writer of their Wonderland series back when they had the license from Disney.

Explore historical records and family tree profiles about Alan Glatfelter on MyHeritage, the world's family history network. Historical records and family trees related to Alan Glatfelter. Records may include photos, original documents, family history, relatives, specific dates, locations and full names. Public Records Index. Bruce Alan Glatfelter 1949Bruce Alan Glatfelter, born 1949. Bruce Alan Glatfelter was born on month day 1949. Bruce lived at address.

In Strongman, a new graphic novel by Charles Soule and Allen Gladfelter to be published by SLG Publishing in March, El Tigre, now throwing wrestling matches to men twenty years his junior for drinking money, takes a final shot at redemption. When a beautiful young woman begs for his help in breaking up an organ trafficking ring, El Tigre has to find the hero that has lain dormant within him for forty years.

Tigre, a masked Mexican wrestler and crime-fighting movie star, was huge in Mexico in the 1970's. These days, he's 65 and drunk, living in Manhattan. When a beautiful woman begs him to stop an organ trafficking ring, the old warrior decides to take one last, epic shot at redemption.
White_Nigga
I first fell in love with Charle Soule's work with 27, after watching an episode of the sorely missed Fresh Ink Online. Upon getting my hands on the first trade of 27, I devoured it, and went looking for all the Soule that I could get my hands on, which, in turn, led me to this less-well-known work, Strongman.

Strongman, serves as Soule's first graphic novel work, and doubles as a really solid debut. The story is as strong as the main character himself, known as Tigre; a man who has fallen out of the limelight for some thirty years. In Mexico, he was a wrestling legend, going 200-1-1, a star of over forty films, and a hero in his country. After the events of 1973, Tigre disappears, along with his companions. Thirty years later, Tigre is throwing fights to guys that he could wipe the floor with for fifty dollars a night. One night, a woman knocks on his door, and presents Tigre with the opportunity to redeem himself, to thwart a plot so despicable that it cuts at the very flesh and soul of our fearless hero.

Soule writes a very deep, compelling story. One that combines elements of Mexican heritage and wrestling, placed in a noir type of setting. Tigre himself, is an unstoppable machine; he feels like a combination of Marv from Sin City, while having a code like Batman, only one that he is willing, at times, to take too far. He may not use guns, but that doesn't mean he won't visit death upon his enemies. His sense of justice and of wanting to do the right thing paints him as the great Mexican hero that time forgot. Soule does a great job of writing the dialogue to fit just such a character. It may feel flat at times, but speaks to the translation aspect of the story. Ponder it a while and you'll realize just how genius and well researched it is.

As a wrestling and comics fan, I thoroughly enjoyed this book. As a debut piece, this is a really strong bit of storytelling from Soule and Allen Gladfelter's art makes me think that this story could have lived as a Telenovela. If you loved 27, you will appreciate just how well Soule constructs characters, and situations that bring out the best in those characters. The only crime, as of the writing of this review, is the unavailability of the second volume of the Strongman saga. However, this first volume is worth repeated visits.
White gold
Fun read.
Burisi
Strongman is an unknown classic by Charles Soule. In black-and-white, it tells the story of Tigre, a 65-year-old luchador from the 1970s who is lured into one last adventure in 2008 New York. A genre-breaking and genre-defining effort, Strongman blends humor, mystery, and adventure. Sure, it's a great story of a luchador movie star who solves crime on the side, but it asks some cool questions. Who is behind the organ-harvesting ring? Who is Maria? Why did Tigre stop fighting crime in the first place? All these questions are answered in a marvelous wrap-up.

I almost wanted to cheer out loud when Tigre got his motorcycle out of the garage, and I laughed out loud more than once. I mean, I'm glad that Charles Soule has gone on to bigger and better things in the past seven years. He's worked for Marvel and DC, becoming the voice behind some of comics' greatest superheroes. This is where you can see Soule in his formative yet already-fantastic years. There is a lot of dialogue for such a short book, and the pages are too small, but the lettering and artwork are more than up to the task. Very highly recommended. ****3/4
Bloodray
Tigre is an old, burned out Luchador wrestler who was once the toast of Mexican wrestling and starred in numerous Luchador films back in the 60s and 70s – kinda like blaxpoitation flicks but with Luchadores. Now he’s throwing seedy wrestling matches for fifty bucks a pop. That is until he’s approached by a woman who bears a striking resemblance to his dead lover from decades past, and she has a mission for him: stop the organ traffickers that’re destroying the poorer neighbourhoods of the city. But, with the crime reaching far beyond the slums to the corridors of political power, will this be Tigre’s last fight?

Debuts are tricky things, especially in comics. Read the debut comics of some of the biggest names writing today – Warren Ellis, Brian Bendis, Garth Ennis, to name a few (coincidentally all surnames ending in “is”) - and you’ll end up reading some pretty crap books with no indication of the quality these guys would achieve years down the line. Charles Soule, though? Strongman is his first published comic and it’s so polished and good, you’d think he’d been in comics for years!

The only other non-superhero book of Soule’s I’ve read is Letter 44, but right away you can tell Strongman is worlds apart from that title. With its storyline of a Luchador wrestler hunting down organ traffickers with his bare hands and saving the city from corrupt politicians, Strongman is a vigilante story that has the gloriously corny aspects of the pulp vigilante stories from the 70s. It reads like a cross between Robert Rodriguez’s Machete and Frank Miller’s The Hard Goodbye.

It’s played totally straight but it also has elements of humour, noir, and pathos sprinkled throughout, and, of course, a deep love and respect for Luchador wrestling (the great Mexican wrestlers never took off their masks, and Tigre is never depicted without his). But Soule also pulls off more sophisticated narrative tricks, playing with what’s real and what’s isn’t as we peek into the mind of a man whose years of alcoholism and fighting have destroyed his memories. There’s the same weird unbalancing scene from The Hard Goodbye where Marv realises Goldie may not be dead, as Tigre sees his own Goldie seemingly come back to life.

I like that Soule basically does his more strait-laced version of the Luchador and that, while Tigre is (and needs to be for the story he’s in) a near-unstoppable machine, that he does have weaknesses and the moments where his true strength come through are based around choices of honour and character rather than physical power. That said, there are some brilliant scenes where Tigre’s strength is utilised well that fit in perfectly with the story.

Allan Gladfelter’s art is wonderful – I loved the character designs for Tigre and his pals, and the opening few pages are creatively constructed and bursting outwards to the reader before settling down into the traditional comic panel structure. The action’s drawn well so none of the beats in the fights are missed, and moments like Tigre sat in a bar booth by himself with a drink have a remarkable power to them.

Also, and this isn’t a spoiler, but when you read this and want to understand the final two pages, pay attention to the borders of the panels throughout the book, and you’ll get your answer.

Strongman’s not the masterpiece that Miller’s The Hard Goodbye was (which it clearly owes a lot to), but it’s still a great comic that does enough to make itself stand out, and it’s a helluva debut to come roaring out of the gate with! Strongman: it’s a good one, guys, check it out!

(This is an aside but, according to Wikipedia - so take this with a hefty pinch of salt - the second Strongman volume is completed, Soule & Gladfelter just haven’t sold it for publication yet. Why, when Soule’s star has never been brighter, have they not published this?! All the Swamp Thing, Red Lanterns, Superman/Wonder Woman, Inhuman, Thunderbolts, She-Hulk and Letter 44 fans Soule’s been cultivating would swarm to it! C’mon chaps, Strongman Volume 2 – let’s have it!)
Ffel
Charles Soule designs a world of quirky Luchadores battling against forces of mysterious power while upholding codes of honor more powerful than that of most superheroes today. The lines between the Hero Tigre's adventures and movies become very blurred but it works. It's a great Phoenix story where one Luchadore pulls himself out of his downward spiral and retirement to write a wrong from his past and stop the greatest villain and mistake he has ever faced!
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