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The Also People (Doctor Who: The New Adventures) (The New Doctor Who Series) ePub download

by Ben Aaronovitch

  • Author: Ben Aaronovitch
  • ISBN: 0426204565
  • ISBN13: 978-0426204565
  • ePub: 1581 kb | FB2: 1513 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Science Fiction
  • Publisher: London Bridge; TV Tie in Ed edition (January 1, 1996)
  • Pages: 272
  • Rating: 4.2/5
  • Votes: 454
  • Format: mbr rtf txt mobi
The Also People (Doctor Who: The New Adventures) (The New Doctor Who Series) ePub download

The New Adventures was a novel series published by the eponymous imprint of Virgin Books.

The New Adventures was a novel series published by the eponymous imprint of Virgin Books.

Softback book in the New Adventures of Doctor Who series. There is so much about THE ALSO PEOPLE that is just pleasant. This was a book billed as the Doctor and his companions simply going on holiday, and it actually delivers on that premise. It's relaxing, understated and utterly absorbing. Its simplicity is its greatest strength. By having a slow-moving plot, we really get to grips with the details, and the details are what make this such an enjoyable read. Although this is one of the largest settings ever seen in a Doctor Who story, the stakes feel surprisingly small.

The New Series Adventures are a series of novels relating to the long-running BBC science fiction television series, Doctor Who. The 'NSAs', as they are often referred to, are published by BBC Books. The 'NSAs', as they are often referred to, are published by BBC Books, and are regularly published twice a year.

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Ben Dylan Aaronovitch (born February 1964) is an English author and screenwriter. He is the author of the Rivers of London series of novels

Ben Dylan Aaronovitch (born February 1964) is an English author and screenwriter. He is the author of the Rivers of London series of novels. He also wrote two Doctor Who serials in the late 1980s and spin-off novels from Doctor Who and Blake's 7. Born in Camden, Aaronovitch is the son of the economist Sam Aaronovitch who was a senior member of the Communist Party of Great Britain, and the younger brother of actor Owen Aaronovitch and journalist David Aaronovitch. He attended Holloway School.

Doctor Who New Adventures 44 - The Also People (Ben Aaronovitch) abbyy. Doctor Who New Adventures 52 - Christmas on a Rational Planet (Lawrence Miles) (v. ) abbyy. Doctor Who New Adventures 45 - Shakedown (Terrance Dicks) (v. Doctor Who New Adventures 53 - Return Of The Living Dad abbyy. Doctor Who New Adventures 54 - The Death of Art abbyy. Doctor Who New Adventures 55 - Damaged Goods (Russell T Davies) (v.

The New Series Adventures, published by BBC Books beginning in 2005, contain new stories featuring the Ninth, Tenth, Eleventh and Twelfth Doctors. Book 1. Doctor Who: The Clockwise Man. by Justin Richards.

A page for describing Recap: Doctor Who New Adventures The Also People. The Doctor declares that it's time for a holiday and takes Benny, Roz and Chris to visit the Worldsphere, home of the People, a post-scarcity civilisation so powerful they have a non-aggression pact with the Time Lords. A melting-pot of races, both biological and mechanical, from many planets of origin, the People have evolved far beyond such petty concepts as "money" and "crime". Advertisement: So, naturally, just as our heroes are settling in for a nice relaxing stay, somebody gets murdered.

Following the Doctor Who television movie in 1996 the BBC chose not to renew Virgin's licence to. .

Following the Doctor Who television movie in 1996 the BBC chose not to renew Virgin's licence to produce Doctor Who novels, choosing instead to publish their own line of original Doctor Who fiction. After 61 New Adventures and 33 Missing Adventures, Doctor Who fiction came to an end at Virgin with The Dying Days, their only Eighth Doctor novel. The New Adventures series continued with Bernice Summerfield, one of the new companions introduced for the New Adventures, as the lead character, starting with her taking up a job as professor of archaeology at the St Oscar's University on the planet of Dellah.

Softback book in the New Adventures of Doctor Who series.
Jonide
This is one of my favorite novels in the Virgin New Adventures line. It's not really a typical "Who" story, in that this time around, there's no real pressing battle against a big bad. The pace of the book is leisurely, and in this case, it works to the overall story's advantage, in that we finally get to see a more relaxed version of this incarnation of the TARDIS crew, and get the time and space to really get inside each character's head. The book provides the greatest insights into the characters of the Seventh Doctor and Roz, and by the end, you feel that you really understand the burdens that each carry as they try to deal with their personal demons. I highly recommend this book for any fan of the NA's who is looking for a departure from what most of the other books in this series typically offers.
Taun
Pleasant. There is so much about THE ALSO PEOPLE that is just pleasant. This was a book billed as the Doctor and his companions simply going on holiday, and it actually delivers on that premise. It's relaxing, understated and utterly absorbing. Its simplicity is its greatest strength. By having a slow-moving plot, we really get to grips with the details, and the details are what make this such an enjoyable read.
Although this is one of the largest settings ever seen in a Doctor Who story, the stakes feel surprisingly small. There is just one unexplained murder to solve, and one ethical dilemma, both of which don't even appear until we're well into the flow. The rest of the time is spent in a combination of world-building and character exploration. It's hard to believe that the same book can feel both relaxing and riveting, but Aaronovitch manages it. The plot is extremely slight, yet the story never feels padded. The book seems to be exactly the right length for the storyline, and although there aren't huge plot twists and revelations every twenty pages, that's wonderful, because that isn't what this book is going for. The book focuses on the small things, and lets the big things take care of themselves. And, really, isn't that what Doctor Who itself has always been about in one form or another?
Every character is gorgeously portrayed, including, surprisingly, the Doctor. Yes, there are a greater-than-average number of scenes told from the Doctor's point of view, and they're fantastic (of course, the average itself is only slightly above zero). I have a sneaking suspicion that Ben Aaronovitch counts among his friends a certain centuries old, world-weary Time Lord and that he somehow sweet-talked that fellow into ghostwriting these sections of the book for him. Shame on Ben Aaronovitch. Of course, he also nails every other character perfectly, so I can deduce that he's also buddies with cops hailing from the far future, a grumpy drunken archeologist, and incredibly powerful aliens living inside a Dyson Sphere. Oh yeah, and God. Lucky Aaronovitch; I bet his dinner parties are a laugh.
Speaking of the Dyson Sphere (if you didn't already know: a Dyson Sphere as a scientific proposal based upon the idea of building a huge shell around a stable star, with people living on the inside walls), it is an incredible achievement that the author was able to make this as believable a concept as it turned out. We know from the back cover that the people of the Worldsphere are an extremely advanced civilization with incredible powers (we're told that they have a non-aggression pact with the Time Lords). All too often, this only results in the initial concept being abandoned when the author needs to have the superior creatures outsmarted by the mere mortal protagonists. But not here. Here, Aaronovitch doesn't let up on his premise in the slightest. The result is a civilization that sparkles and jumps right off the page. Is this because the core ideas were borrowed from another source? Possibly, though I haven't read any of Iain M. Banks' Culture novels, so I don't really have an opinion on that. The main point is that wherever the ideas come from, they work extremely well here, and they're treated intelligently.
But huge world-building aside, it's the little things that the book does that are the reason it's so popular. The prose is sharp and wonderful. The novel is deceptively simple; it's only when I go back and rethink certain portions that I realize quite how clever Aaronovitch was in the construction of the themes. The murder subplot, the treatment of Chris and Roz by the Worldsphere people, and the sections with Kadiatu all revolve around the same topics, and it's a blast working out how everything fits together. I think there are one or two points of the plot that are sacrificed to make the themes succeed properly, but, in context, it worked.
For anyone who thinks that the NAs were too gritty, too dark, too angsty, or just plain "not Doctor Who", THE ALSO PEOPLE should be required reading. It deals with deep and thoughtful issues, but it does so in an amazingly enjoyable story that contains as many great jokes as it does introspective passages. There's much to cherish in this one. From the Doctor sadly wondering if he couldn't just be a street entertainer, to the sentient, talking parachute, to the scene of Cwej accidentally dumping several gallons of water onto a sleeping Doctor's head, there are just too many great scenes in the book to dryly list off in a review such as this. Just snag yourself a copy and read it immediately. And if you've already read it, read it again.
Gosar
Wow! This book is as vast and as stimulating as the environment it is set in. The idea of Dyson Spheres is an excellent one, and although an old idea (I've been fascinated with the concept since reading Larry Niven's 'Ringworld', and Colin Kapp's 'Cageworld' series years ago), it is a new concept for Doctor Who. I'm surprised it has never been explored in the series until now, or for that matter, since.
Saying this book is a murder mystery is an understatement, yet at it's simplest The Also People is an old-fashioned who-dunnit. Where this book surpasses the ordinary is the fact that the author also seizes the opportunity to create a convincing, fresh environment, a unique, interesting culture and then populates it with numerous appealing, 3-dimensional characters.
The TARDIS crew are extremely well handled here. The foursome of the Doctor, Benny, Roz and Chris are 'real people' in this book. Benny is just being Benny. She does things because, in that situation, that is how Benny would react. The same is true for the others; their actions are true to their character. They live their lives and the plot flows naturally from this.
Racial tolerance is one of the main themes explored by this book. A theme very current today, and I fear for a long time into the future. The People are a civilisation consisting of both organic and non-organic (sentient machines) people. All types are recognised as 'human'. It is impossible to denigrate someone in this culture by sex or colour (for example), when simple things like sex and colour are a preference and can be changed at whim. In this culture, things like sex, sexual preference, colour, body shape and even race have become irrelevant.
I have only one (extremely small) difficulty with this novel. The idea that The People are so advanced that they have a non-aggression pact with the Time Lords is a compelling one, but I find it hard to believe that any civilisation without time travel could hold it's own against an enemy with time travel.
A unique experience. Easily one of the best Doctor Who novels yet written. The People are long overdue a return visit.
Skunk Black
I was very excited to read a book that had such high reviews. Unfortunately, I was very dissappointed. I read to about page 70 and just couldn't keep going. The plot was going nowhere, the story dragged and bored me. The Doctor is absent from most pages, and his new companions bored me to tears. This Dyson Sphere planet is a clever idea--almost too clever. The setting, the super-advanced world is dull and empty. In addition, the names of the natives are full of capital letters for some reason. What's more, there are exclamation points in the middle of their names. I found the names annoying, and the book tedious. I tried to finish it, but I couldn't waste my time.
Instead, I would highly recommend The Festival of Death--a terrific Fourth Doctor story by Jonathan Morris.
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