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Greybeard (Gollancz SF) ePub download

by Brian Wilson Aldiss

  • Author: Brian Wilson Aldiss
  • ISBN: 0575071133
  • ISBN13: 978-0575071131
  • ePub: 1800 kb | FB2: 1726 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Science Fiction
  • Publisher: Gollancz; New Ed edition (March 1, 2011)
  • Pages: 256
  • Rating: 4.2/5
  • Votes: 231
  • Format: mobi txt lit mbr
Greybeard (Gollancz SF) ePub download

Elegantly written for a book of this type, Brian Aldiss creates a near future world in which nuclear testing has gone awry, temporarily allowing some hard radiation from the sun to saturate the earth, destroying the ability of larger mammals including humans to reproduce themselves. There are two parallel stories, one which takes place in a sad present when the youngest human beings are well into their fifties, and the other in three separate periods gradually ranging back in time to just after the initial accident.

His byline reads either Brian W. Aldiss or simply Brian Aldiss, except for occasional pseudonyms during the mid-1960s. Greatly influenced by science fiction pioneer H. G. Wells, Aldiss was a vice-president of the international H. Wells Society.

Greybeard is a science fiction novel by British author Brian Aldiss, published in 1964. Set decades after the Earth's population has been sterilised as a result of nuclear bomb tests conducted in Earth's orbit, the book shows a world emptying of humans, with only an ageing, childless population left. The story is mainly told through the eyes of Algernon "Algy" Timberlane (the titular Greybeard) and his wife, Martha.

Although he was reading a book, he looked up frequently, directing his gaze through the window. With one of these glances, he saw the patrol man with the colourful shirt approaching over the pastures. Sam’s coming, he said. He put his book down as he spoke. His name was Algy Timberlane. He had a thick grizzled beard that grew down almost to his navel, where it had been cut sharply across. Because of this beard, he was known as Greybeard, although he lived in a world of greybeards.

Brian W. Aldiss was born in Dereham, United Kingdom on August 18, 1925 . In 1943, he joined the Royal Signals regiment, and saw action in Burma. He wrote more than 80 books including Hothouse, Greybeard, The Helliconia Trilogy, The Squire Quartet, Frankenstein Unbound, The Malacia Tapestry, Walcot, and Mortal Morning. His short story Super-Toys Last All Summer Long was the basis for the film . Artificial Intelligence.

Set decades after the Earth’s population has been sterilised as a result of nuclear bomb tests conducted in Earth's orbit, the book shows an emptying world, occupied by an ageing, childless population. It started a long time ago (in a galaxy far, far away), back in 1969, when British author Brian W. Aldiss published a short story in Harper's Bazaar, entitled Supertoys Last All Summer Long. It challenged the whole public thought on machines and the idea of robots. And it also managed to pique the interest of director Stanley Kubrick. Kubrick acquired the rights to the story from Aldiss in November of 1982, and had hopes to make it into a feature film.

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Aldiss Brian Wilson - Super-Toys Last All Summer Long. Aldiss Brian Wilson - A Day In The Life Of A Galactic Empire. Читать fb2. Aldiss Brian Wilson - Mroczne lata świetlne. Читать pdf. Aldiss Brian Wilson - A Tupolev Too Far. Aldiss Brian Wilson.

Ecological disaster has left the English countryside a wasteland. Humanity faces extinction, unless Greybeard and his wife Martha are successful in their quest for the scarcest and most precious of resources: human children.
Thordira
Algy Timberlane, now called Greybeard, is one of the youngest men in the world at the age of 56. Within his lifetime, Greybeard lived through the Accident that sterilized most higher mammals, fought in the wars over the remaining children of earth. For the past few decades he’s been living in an England where government has collapsed and reverted back to isolated societies. With his wife Martha and a few others, Greybeard escapes a paranoid village to travel along the Thames. They pass through the ruins of the old world and the remnants of an infirm population, a tour of how the world ends, lit by faint rays of hope amongst the darkness.

I wasn’t sure what to expect with Greybeard, but in hindsight it’s one of those books I should have read ages ago. Aldiss is an excellent storyteller who’s created an intricate world, displaying the beauty and the grotesque with bittersweet grandeur. There’s a lot of thought in Greybeard, not just about the lack of children but about aging and dying, and those themes of entropy work wonders when combined with the spectacle of apocalypse.
Rarranere
Elegantly written for a book of this type, Brian Aldiss creates a near future world in which nuclear testing has gone awry, temporarily allowing some hard radiation from the sun to saturate the earth, destroying the ability of larger mammals including humans to reproduce themselves. There are two parallel stories, one which takes place in a sad present when the youngest human beings are well into their fifties, and the other in three separate periods gradually ranging back in time to just after the initial accident. The reader therefore sees the present in light of the turbulent events of the previous fifty years when everything began to unravel.

The two main characters, Greybeard and his wife, are immensely likeable and realistic. Unlike some of Brian Aldiss's later works, this is an old fashioned book, easy to read and well plotted. The most interesting feature of the book is the immensely sad world created by the author; what's the point to life if you can't pass on your genes to another generation?

The characters must figure that out along the way.

If you like John Wyndham's and John Christopher's end of the world stories, you're bound to appreciate this one as well.
Gardagar
A future where there are no children and the despair and problems of a population of oldsters, diseases, dementia and just plain bad behavior. A future where some people believe there is no hope or they cling to false hopes. Interesting, slow paced but not So slow.
Mildorah
This book had really believable characters. I recommend it to anyone who likes Sci-fi and fantasy. I'll probably read it again in the future. I'll watch for more books of this type and by this author.
Hellblade
This is a good book - I would recommend
RuTGamer
I am sure he was trying to go somewhere with this story, but it just never got there. The characters were too shallow to connect to and the ending was anti-climatic and made a mess of the thread of the story. Keeping in mind that this was written in 1964 and was probably much more relevant and on topic then. Growing up in the "hide under your desk, nuclear fall out drill" era this slow slide into death did not strike a chord with me and seemed a sad end.
Oparae
The premise--that mankind is dying out--is a bleak one, but Aldiss manages to bring purpose and hope to this depressing landscape, creating a world with potentials for idyllic self-fulfillment, a world where even mankind shows virtue as well as its predictable descent into vain control and paranoia in a world where all systems ultimately break down. Fine apocalyptic lit.
Don't get me wrong, I did love it, just not as much as I hoping to. In some ways it reminded me of 28 Days Later the way society devolved, lost without youth. The writing was superb and I do recommend this to anyone who likes scifi/dystopian in the vein of Margaret Atwood or say, Cormac McCarthy.
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