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Count Zero (Sprawl Trilogy) ePub download

by Jonathan Davis,William Gibson

  • Author: Jonathan Davis,William Gibson
  • ISBN: 161106211X
  • ISBN13: 978-1611062113
  • ePub: 1834 kb | FB2: 1699 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Science Fiction
  • Publisher: Brilliance Audio; Unabridged edition (February 15, 2011)
  • Rating: 4.6/5
  • Votes: 149
  • Format: azw lit lrf docx
Count Zero (Sprawl Trilogy) ePub download

Count Zero (Sprawl Trilogy) MP3 CD – Audiobook, MP3 Audio, Unabridged. This book is really about introducing "The Count" himself, and describing the events that shaped him for the concluding book of this trilogy: "Mona Lisa Overdrive"

Count Zero (Sprawl Trilogy) MP3 CD – Audiobook, MP3 Audio, Unabridged. by. William Gibson (Author). Find all the books, read about the author, and more. Are you an author? Learn about Author Central. This book is really about introducing "The Count" himself, and describing the events that shaped him for the concluding book of this trilogy: "Mona Lisa Overdrive". The world is fleshed out a bit, and the reader is treated to the unending complexity of Gibson's world. This, like the other two books in the series are fascinating and in many ways plausible look at how the world might end up.

The Sprawl trilogy (also known as the Neuromancer, Cyberspace, or Matrix trilogy) is William Gibson's first set of novels, composed of Neuromancer (1984), Count Zero (1986), and Mona Lisa Overdrive (1988).

Part of Sprawl series by William Gibson. Penguin Books Canada Ltd, 10 Alcorn Avenue, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M4V 3B2. Published by the Penguin Group: Penguin Books Ltd, 80 Strand, London WC2R 0RL, England. Penguin Books India (P) Ltd, 11 Community Centre, Panchsheel Park, New Delhi - 110 017, India. Penguin Books (NZ) Ltd, Cnr Rosedale and Airborne Roads, Albany, Auckland, New Zealand. Penguin Books (South Africa) (Pty) Ltd, 5 Watkins Street, Denver Ext 4, Johannesburg 2094, South Africa.

Gibson, William - Bridge Trilogy 01 - Virtual Light. Gibson, William - Sprawl 2 - Count Zero. 316 Kb. Gibson, William - Bridge Trilogy 01-03 - The Bridge Trilogy. 694 Kb. Gibson, William - Bridge Trilogy 03 - All Tomorrow's Parties.

Sprawl Trilogy William Gibson. 3 people like this topic. Want to like this page?

Although Colin Laney (from Gibson's earlier novel Idoru) lives in a cardboard box, he has the power to change the world.

Although Colin Laney (from Gibson's earlier novel Idoru) lives in a cardboard box, he has the power to change the world. Thanks to an experimental drug that he received during his youth, Colin can see "nodal points" in the vast streams of data that make u. Burning Chrome (Sprawl, by William Gibson · Bruce Sterling.

Count Zero (Sprawl Trilogy). ISBN 10: 0441013678 ISBN 13: 9780441013678. Publisher: Ace, 2006.

A corporate mercenary wakes in a reconstructed body, a beautiful woman by his side. Then Hosaka Corporation reactivates him, for a mission more dangerous than the one he’s recovering from: to get a defecting chief of R&D — and the biochip he’s perfected—out intact. But this proves to be of supreme interest to certain other parties — some of whom aren’t remotely human… “Potent and heady.” —Philadelphia Daily News “An intriguing cast of characters and a tough, glitzy image of computer consciousness and the future of mankind.” —Richmond Times-Dispatch “Count Zero shares with Neuromancer that novel’s stunning use of language, breakneck pacing, technological innovation, and gritty brand-name realism.” —Fantasy Review “William Gibson’s prose, astonishing in its clarity and skill, becomes high-tech electric poetry.” —Bruce Sterling “Suspense, action…a lively story…a sophisticated version of the sentient computer, a long way from the old models that were simply out to Rule the World.” —Locus
roternow
As per usual, half the punctuation is missing because of crappy OCR, but even worse, every single one of the full line breaks which indicate a scene change are systematically removed. So you read a line of dialogue and then the very next line is being said hours later, or in a different frame of reference, etc., and doesn't make sense until you think about it a minute and realize that there used to be a visual indication of the frame shift which has been removed because Amazon churns out shoddy product and charges full price for it.
Dyni
“Signature smell of the Sprawl, a rich amalgam of stale subway exhalations, ancient soot, and the carcinogenic tang of fresh plastics, all of it shot through with the carbon edge of illicit fossil fuels.”

The follow up to Neuromancer, Count Zero is another cyberpunk classic that revisits many themes of his previous book. It follows several interconnected stories: a mercenary hired to attack a corporate fortress that escapes with a girl that has undergone experimental modifications and can hack computers without a deck. A hacker that is almost killed as he is played into testing an experimental deck and discover that there are strange entities roaming the matrix. And a small art gallery owner from Paris that is hired by a eccentric trillionaire to find a series of boxes.

The language and descriptions here are top-notch. Gibson has an uncanny talent to makes this now retro-futuristic world come alive, along with several interesting and mind-bending themes. One is how corporations and Big Money end up having a life and will of their own, not only like a living organism, but a colony of different spheres with different agendas that compete among themselves. Another is how artificial intelligences adopt an air of godhood as they incorporate the persona of voodoo gods.
Landamath
Gibson is up there with Asimov, Dick, Clarke, and Herbert. His projections into the future are disturbingly accurate for being written in the 80s. His frenetic writing style also matches the adrenaline that's pumped into the plot of this book. If you're a sci-fi cyberpunk fan with a tilt towards multiverses, biotechnology, multi-threaded plots and the ilk, then this is the book for you.

This is the second of the Sprawl trilogy with Neuromancer preceding Count Zero and Mona Lisa Overdrive coming after. You don't have to read Neuromancer first, but it definitely helps set the stage for the type of world that Gibson immerses you in. Very much looking forward to reading Mona Lisa Overdrive next.

Also, if you're deciding between this and Neal Stephenson (Snowcrash) I'd highly recommend the Sprawl trilogy instead.
MisTereO
This is a brilliant novel! I couldn't put it down and i finished it in a week. Cyber punk sci fi fans need to get this novel along with Neuromancer and Mona Lisa Overdrive to complete this wonderfully bizarre Sprawl trilogy. The film the Matrix triology was supposed to an adaptation of these novels, but those movies lack the complexity, the strangeness, and the bizarre atmosphere of this novel Count Zero within its compendium. If a movie was made about these books the way that Mr. Gibson wrote them people's minds would be blown. These novels are written in a beautiful poetic type of writing, which is unique to science fiction just as the stories are. Gibson writes science fiction like Shakespeare writes a sonnet. You'll enjoy this novel if you value well written fiction, but if you like light and straight forward stories this book is not for you.
Whitesmasher
Count Zero is a worthy sequel to "Neuromancer", and is one of those rare works (with its siblings) that seems almost (but not quite) prophetic. Gibson's world is similar to ours in oh so many ways, and the corollaries between the Internet of today and his vision of cyberspace in 1987 are astonishing. One has to wonder if the names of the nations/corporations were just changed a bit, and the dates were just shifted a bit into the future...whether we are getting closer to Gibson's grim and dystopian future? (So maybe it is prophetic after all?)

This book is really about introducing "The Count" himself, and describing the events that shaped him for the concluding book of this trilogy: "Mona Lisa Overdrive". The world is fleshed out a bit, and the reader is treated to the unending complexity of Gibson's world. This, like the other two books in the series are fascinating and in many ways plausible look at how the world _might_ end up. Although this truly is a setup book, don't let that dissuade you, the characters are awesome, and the story is engaging.

I recall reading this years ago, perhaps about the time it appeared on the bookshelves the first time, and being fascinated with it. Now, with 25+ years between its' publishing and today, it still manages to capture my attention and interest. Gibson is one of those writers who can write stories about characters and technology in such a way that while central to the story the technology doesn't overwhelm the characters and is abstract enough that even 25 years after he penned the book, it doesn't feel dated or implausible, just different.

In this, "Neuromancer" "Count Zero" & "Mona Lisa Overdrive" remind me of E.E. "Doc" Smith's Lensman Novels where starships are flown with banks of Levers, Valves and Inertial Navigation systems, or even the great Isaac Asimov's Foundation books, where "Atomics" rule the day. Even though the technology in their works is dated or even absurd, the stories still stand and are considered classics. So too "Neuromancer", "Count Zero" & "Mona Lisa Overdrive" where I think you'll find that the concept of a [Cyber] Deck isn't so far different from modern tablets, cell phones & PC's after all...and Cyberspace absolutely reeks of the modern Internet (aka Cyberspace!). Even without that easy correlation however, like Asimov & Smith, Gibson's books are bonified classics.

On top of that, "Neuromancer", "Count Zero" & "Mona Lisa Overdrive" are THE books that began the entire Cyberpunk genre/meme. How cool is that?

"Count Zero" is a book I consider a staple of my collection of great Science Fiction. For me, it and its' siblings stand proudly among my collection of Asimov, Foster, Anderson, Anthony, Pohl, Banks, Bova, Smith, Heinlein, Dickson and many others.
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