Noir ePub download

by K.W. Jeter

  • Author: K.W. Jeter
  • ISBN: 0553576380
  • ISBN13: 978-0553576382
  • ePub: 1956 kb | FB2: 1367 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Science Fiction
  • Publisher: Spectra; Bantam Spectra Pbk. Ed edition (September 1, 1999)
  • Rating: 4.7/5
  • Votes: 795
  • Format: azw lit docx lrf
Noir ePub download

Jeter the author dishes up a new slice of reality-one seen through the cyber-fixed eyes of his "asp head" character McNihil. McNihil prefers the noir reality to the world of neurotechnology, brain manipulation, others were forced to endure

Jeter the author dishes up a new slice of reality-one seen through the cyber-fixed eyes of his "asp head" character McNihil. McNihil prefers the noir reality to the world of neurotechnology, brain manipulation, others were forced to endure. The work he has done on his vision permits him to see a world with noir (black & white) vision.

Noir K W Jeter Travelt, a corporate flunkey at DynaZauber, is dead, but his prowler is still stalking the Wedge. McNihil's every nerve ending screams no, but Harrisch won't take no for an answer.

Kevin Wayne Jeter (born March 26, 1950), known both personally and professionally as K. W. Jeter, is an American science fiction and horror author known for his literary writing style, dark themes, and paranoid, unsympathetic characters. He has written novels set in the Star Trek and Star Wars universes, and has written three sequels to Blade Runner.

Jeter at his very best, a dazzling and inventive futuristic drama of mystery, menace, and sexual terror set in a society of glitter and sinister darkness in which no one can be trusted and everything is far worse than it seems.

McNihil found that funny, because the place looked like a doctor’s office. A real one, the way doctors’ offices looked in the movies stitched inside his eyes. r, even though forty-eight hours or more-hard to tell in the perpetual night McNihil saw-had passed since Harrisch’s thugs had handed his ass to him. He’d spent the time since that occasion lying on top of the narrow bed in his unkempt apartment, in the same clothes he’d been wearing then and was wearing now.

To my mind this is Jeter’s best book, with more than enough cool .

To my mind this is Jeter’s best book, with more than enough cool Steampunk ingredients to make me jealous. I wish I could simply steal half a dozen and put them into my pocket for later use, but I’ll have to be satisfied with merely reading-and rereading-the book. You should too. -James P. Blaylock, author of the Langdon St. Ives novels. Jeter's London, a London where technology is out of control and ruled by the upper class. Travelt, a corporate flunkey at DynaZauber, is dead, but his prowler is still stalking the Wedge.

NOIR is a brilliantly atmospheric thriller, set in a Los Angeles that stands at the centre of an urban sprawl spanning half the globe. Where the haves live in splendour and the have-nots scrabble in the dark. Where the dead live on until their debts are paid. Jeter (1950 - ) Kevin Wayne Jeter attended college at California State University, Fullerton where he became friends with James P. Blaylock and Tim Powers, and through them, Philip K. Dick. He is the first person to coin the term "Steampunk," in a letter to Locus magazine in April 1987, to describe the retro-technology, alternate-history works that he published along with his friends, Blaylock and Powers.

A master of dark visions, Jeter delivers his most. ambitious book to date.

accomplishes his goal of updating the genre, and he does so with commendable energy and imagination. A master of dark visions, Jeter delivers his most. An SF equivalent, perhaps, of The Name of the Rose. the sparkling metropolis at the new center of what’s left of the civilized world.

Noir is a science fiction novel by K W Jeter. Corpses in this book aren't allowed to die, they go into debt and are kept from the grave to hang out on the dead side of what was . now the Gloss) to wait for some job so they can be buried. One guy, McNihil, who is a detective for the ASCAP Corp. He has a primo job, liscence to kill.

L.A.: the sparkling metropolis at the new center of what's left of the civilized world. Here wealthy men and women seek forbidden thrills through a system that enables them to indulge safely and anonymously in their wildest fantasies through the use of computerized simulations known as prowlers. Then a young executive at one of the world's most powerful corporations is brutally slain and an ex-information cop named McNihil is called in to find the dead man's still "living" prowler.McNihil knows he's walking into a trap. But he wants a chance to redeem himself for a botched job that forced him into retirement years ago. Teamed with a ruthless female operative called November, McNihil is about to enter a world in which no one can be trusted and things are far worse than they seem...a world in which a vast conspiracy of evil is about to blur the razor-thin line between the sane safety of daylight and the dark danger of Noir.
Faegal
Back when I was in high school (over 20 years ago!), I happened to read Dr. Adder (written in 1972 but only published in 1984) and Glass Hammer (1985) by KW Jeter. I thought both books were brilliant and that Jeter would become a major SF writer. When Noir first came out in 1998, though, I didn't read it because I didn't like the cover blurb and ch1 was unreadable.

11 years later, I finally decided to read Noir because it's the last original novel Jeter wrote. I could almost kick myself for waiting so long because it's truly superb. Yes, it has some rather grotesque moments (I will NEVER forget the "asp-head trophy" or a "Prince Charming" makeover). However, except for ch1, it's highly readable, has a great story and it pulls everything together for a memorable ending.

Some might find it to be too extreme but I think that reflects Jeter's horror background. Like some readers, I didn't care for the copyright rant (however, this occupies only 1/4 of the book). Let's hope Jeter returns to writing again.

Update: After a 2nd reading, I feel even more strongly Noir is a neglected masterpiece (no doubt the grotesque "trophy" interlude is part of the reason for the neglect)- certainly, it's not for everyone but many of the reviews here are unfairly negative.
Runehammer
I didn't really enjoy _Noir_ all that much. The writing was convoluted, seemingly for its own sake at times, and it never built toward an ending. It seemed, rather, to meander in exacting description of just how bad everything is.
The last 40 pages or so wrapped the plot together by revealing a lot of off screen action that made for a 'happy' ending. While the reader is struggling to understand the significace of McNihil's eyes, and why it is they are mentioned every 10 pages or so, McNihil is solving everything, without having the decency to let the reader know what the Hell it is that he's doing!
It was, however, rather disappointing to wade through the baroque writing of the first few hundred pages and find it to be nothing more than scene setting. Not plot development. Scene setting.
Sure, the characterizations are interesting, and yes, the world is somewhat dark. Wasn't worth the build up.
Doriel
A true masterpiece.
Unclear at times and hard to read due to its eccentric style and grim setting,
A true gem in the spirit of William Buruz.
Burking
In NOIR by K.W. Jeter the author dishes up a new slice of reality-one seen through the cyber-fixed eyes of his "asp head" character McNihil. McNihil prefers the noir reality to the world of neurotechnology, brain manipulation, others were forced to endure. The work he has done on his vision permits him to see a world with noir (black & white) vision. Noir vision appears to win out in the end. As one character described it, "Maybe the old movies had finally leaked out from McNihil's private universe to the world at large so everyone could see them at last the way he did."
Using a hero who can't really be killed off does present an alternate reality that no doubt Jeter's real life hero, Philip K. Dick, would enjoy. In fact Jeter uses one of Dick's best lines, "Reality is that which when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away," without attribution. Perhaps since continuing the Blade Runner novels Jeter sees their identities as blurred together.
Jeter creates his own Alice down the cyberspace, x-rated rabbit hole he calls the Wedge World. The capitalistic villain of the story attempts to turn the Wedge World into a vector pool, where a "vector" disease will infect the minds of all those who come a lusting after sex. McNihil's noir vision allows him to avoid this trap but not without paying the ultimate price.
This experimental genre seems to ask the question: Can you unwind a story with a hero who emerges from a pure, nihilistic womb? Or to put it another way can the reader identify with a hero who not only has a fetish for murder but for making audio cables out of human spines (Reminiscent of Hitler's human skin lamp shades). How about a hero who speaks with the dead and even narrates the story from his own deceased tongue? The speaking dead could have been a literary device to assure the reader he wasn't talking about flesh and blood people, rather in metaphors with which to spotlight reality's riddles.
Yggdi
Imagine a world where the latest tattoo is neon, under the skin, and changes constantly, where debt is the overriding distinction of when, where and how you will die or live. And that debt is constantly updated, immediately available.
This is a nuts book, a great book: reminiscent of the classics like 1984 and Fahrenheit 451. It was a read I wanted to throw away and forget. Instead, I could not put it down.
The view it has of the future chills to the bone, it often sounds soulless and devoid of the rudiments of humanity but nonetheless rings possible in so many regards. Still, the qualities of commitment, compassion, loyalty, and forgiveness do shine through at unexpected moments, putting the rest of the story into sharp relief. The unexpected twists spun my head around, the integrity and ambivalence of the main character especially. Sometimes his acts of kindness seem to be just a sham put on to cover up his inability to feel or relate to his feelings. There is an unrelenting sadness to the story that I was unprepared for. You would not believe where K. W. Jeter will take you with this one. Months later it still chases around in my head.
This author is my favorite kind of Science Fiction writer - he sets up a story that is incredibly plausible, then he makes me think about the philosophical quandaries that the new age will require me to make clear to myself: what is ultimately important, worth risking it all for, of real value - and what kinds of things (objectives, priorities, morals, attitudes) need to be pitched in order to save the future?
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