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Callahan's Con ePub download

by Barrett Whitener,Spider Robinson

  • Author: Barrett Whitener,Spider Robinson
  • ISBN: 0786184531
  • ISBN13: 978-0786184538
  • ePub: 1726 kb | FB2: 1667 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Science Fiction
  • Publisher: Blackstone Audiobooks; Library ed. edition (October 1, 2004)
  • Rating: 4.9/5
  • Votes: 205
  • Format: lit docx lit docx
Callahan's Con ePub download

Spider Robinson (Author), Barrett Whitener (Reader). Book 9 of 9 in the Callahan's Crosstime Saloon Series

Spider Robinson (Author), Barrett Whitener (Reader). Book 9 of 9 in the Callahan's Crosstime Saloon Series.

Spider Robinson is renowned for his Callahan's Place series of bestselling novels. With his late wife, Jeanne, he wrote the award-winning Stardance series. As an audiobook reader of his own and others' work, he has won the Earphones Award and been a finalist for the Audie Awards. In 2008, he won the Robert A. Heinlein Award for Lifetime Excellence in Literature. Series: Callahan (Book 2000).

Spider Robinson (Author), Barrett Whitener (Narrator), Inc. Blackstone Audio (Publisher). Get this audiobook plus a second, free. Sometimes we must give up our fictional friends.

Narrated by Barrett Whitener. The discreet little bar that Jake Stonebender established a few blocks below Duval Street is simply called The Place.

There, Fast Eddie Costigan learned to curse back at parrots as he played the house piano, the Reverend Tom Hauptman learned to tend bar bare-chested without blushing, Long-Drink McGonnigle discovered the margarita and several senoritas, and all the other regulars settled into comfortable subtropical niches of their own. Nobody even noticed them save the universe.

In 1977 Robinson released Callahan's Crosstime Saloon, a collection of short stories in his long-running Callahan's series. These stories, and later novels, make frequent reference to the works of mystery writer John D. MacDonald; his character Lady Sally McGee reflects Travis McGee, the central character in MacDonald's mystery novels.

Callahan's Crosstime Saloon is the neighborhood tavern to all of time and space . Blackstone Audio has created a combination impossible to beat in its pairing of The Callahan Chronicals and narrator Barrett Whitener'

Callahan's Crosstime Saloon is the neighborhood tavern to all of time and space, where the regulars are anything but. These time travelers, talking dogs, alcoholic vampires, and cybernetic aliens really, truly care about each other. Time Travelers Strictly Cash is the policy. Blackstone Audio has created a combination impossible to beat in its pairing of The Callahan Chronicals and narrator Barrett Whitener'. This production has the tone of a one-on-one conversation with a remarkable individual whose deep insights illuminate an even more remarkable universe and its inhabitants.

Written by Spider Robinson, Audiobook narrated by Barret Whitener. Narrated by: Barrett Whitener. Length: 16 hrs and 51 mins.

Books by Spider Robinson. Callahan’s Place books: Callahan’s Crosstime Saloon. CALLAHAN'S CON was originally titled CALLAHAN'S CONCH, but was changed by the publisher at the time. Time Travelers Strictly Cash. Off The Wall at Callahan’s. Lady Sally’s House books: Callahan’s Lady. Lady Slings the Booze. Mary’s Place books: The Callahan Touch. Callahan’s Key. Callahan’s Con. Stardance books: Stardance (with Jeanne Robinson). The following Author's Note is in regards to the original titl. uthor’s Note

The discreet little bar that Jake Stonebender established a few blocks below Duval Street is simply called The Place. There, Fast Eddie Costigan learned to curse back at parrots as he played the house piano, the Reverend Tom Hauptman learned to tend bar bare-chested without blushing, Long-Drink McGonnigle discovered the margarita and several senoritas, and all the other regulars settled into comfortable subtropical niches of their own. Nobody even noticed them save the universe. Over time, the twice-transplanted patrons of Callahan's Place attracted a pixilated collection of local zanies so quintessentially Key West that they made the New York originals seem almost normal. The elfin little Key deer, for instance--with a stevedore's mouth; or the merman with eczema; or Robert Heinlein's teleporting cat. For ten slow, merry years, life was good. The sun shone, the coffee dripped, the breeze blew just strongly enough to dissipate the smell of the puns, and little supergenius Erin grew to the verge of adolescence. Then disaster struck. Through the gate one sunny day comes a malevolent, moronic mastodon of a Mafioso named Tony Donuts, Jr. He's decided to resurrect the classic protection racket in Key West--and guess which tavern he's picked to hit first? Then, thanks to very poor accessorizing, Jake's wife, Zoey, suddenly finds herself in a place with no light, no heat, and no air--and no way home. The urgent question of her whereabouts turns out to be a problem so complex that even the entire gang, equipped with teleportation, time travel, and telepathy, might not be able to crack it in time. And while all this is going on, Death himself walks into The Place. But this time he will not leave alone.
Beanisend
The last few of the books derived from the old "Callhan's" series had seemed somewhat of a letdown from the older books; not that they were bad, but I didn't enjoy them nearly as much as I had the originals. I was beginning to wonder if it was me, not them; if I had changed sufficiently as I aged from my twenties into my forties that I could no longer appreciate the kind of story I'd enjoyed then.

I'm still not sure, but this book was definitely back on a par with the older entries in the series; it was flawed (so were they, if you looked hard enough) but it was good enough to overcome its flaws. More, it was good enough to overcome one of the flaws that really bothered me about the previous entry, "Callahan's Key"; I can't say too much without giving a spoiler, but suffice it to say that I don't expect Jake and the other Callahan's regulars to be insensitive jerks; they don't prejudge people simply because they're alien cyborgs, or sentient computer networks; it seemed wrong that they would prejudge someone just because she was (A) ugly and (B) had a silly name. The fact that they did made it pretty clear that Spider was, and that bothered me; in this book, we get his apology (via Jake).

If you've tried the Callahan's books before and found them pointless and silly, your opinion of this one will be the same. If you loved them all, you'll certainly love this one. If you've felt that they'd been slipping for a while, give this one a try; you may enjoy it. If you've NEVER tried the Callahan's books before, then if you like your science fiction WEIRD, well-written and moving in spite of being silly, you will probably enjoy this book, but you might want to read some of the earlier entries in the series first.
Clandratha
Full of Robinson's trademark blend of humor and pathos (though not so many puns this time), this latest installment of the Callahan gang finds the bar threatened by several perilous situations, only slightly related. Although I love Callahan's and like meeting up with old friends there, the whole enterprise begins to seem overweighted with inherited characters. Plus, I'm getting a little tired of the way Erin the Super-girl solves every problem with her increasingly godlike powers. The problem with every series with familiar, well-beloved characters seems to be the apparently irresistible urge authors have to drag everybody through another sequel. How many times can Jack Bauer, for instance, save the world (or Jack O'Neill, or Mike Callahan/Jake Stonebender) before it gets a little ridiculous? Luckily, Robinson dodges yet another improbable rescue (how do you follow saving the whole universe, as in "Callahan's Key", anyway? Find multiple universes and save them?), but he comes up with situations only loosely related, almost like the short stories of the first few books, to do it. But hey, it's Spider Robinson writing about Callahan's folks, so what more can you ask?
Haracetys
Jake Stonebender just can't get any peace. Having saved the universe twice and the Earth at least three times, does he now get a little break from busybody bureaucrats? Of course not - mainly because, if he did, Spider would have had no story to tell. So we open this latest segment in the Callahan saga with the entrance of the bureaucrat from hell in the person of Senior Field Inspector Czrjghbczl of the Florida Department of Education, wondering just what is being done about the education of Erin, Jake's daughter, and if her home environment is conducive to producing a fine, wholesome, upstanding lady. Of course, Jake's explanation of the situation is upstaged by his rather non-standard denizens of The Place, especially by the talking dog Ralph and the equally unusual deer Alf, and the sudden appearance of Erin herself, sans clothes - and then things really start to go downhill.
One problem is never enough for a Callahan novel, so the appearance of Tony Donuts, Jr. demanding protection money is par for the course. To fully appreciate the gravity of the appearance of this persona, you need to have read Callahan's Lady, but even without that benefit, this current incarnation of the man-mountain is suitably threatening and just bright enough to foil simple solutions.
The early portion of this book, where the above situations are laid out, is hilariously funny, replete with Spider's trademark groan-inducing puns, fractured syntax, tall tales, incredible characters, biting satire, and song spoofs - Spider at his best. But when he turns to how to solve these twin problems, some of the fun seems to go away. The 'con' that The Place gang of very unusual beings comes up with is far from original (how many have been scammed by being sold the whereabouts of The Fountain of Youth?), although the particular implementation of this scam has some very unique aspects. When the Donut problem is solved, Spider now invents a new problem - his wife has gone time-travelling (without appropriate spatial correction) in an attempt to find out what was going on with her daughter while operating the scam. And the only way to find her calls for, once more, (and one time too many), the gang to get together in a telepathic group bond. This seemed to me to be unnecessary padding, and the real ending to the story would have read just as well without this incident thrown in.
There are multiple references throughout this book to happenings in other Callahan books, many insider jokes from the SF field, and even at one point an underhanded reference to Spider's musical recordings (he has a fine voice that should be more well-known, but such are the vagaries of the music business). All rather standard for a Callahan novel, but I did feel he may have overdone it a little in this one, possibly making it difficult for someone who hasn't read the rest of the Callahan books to completely follow and understand the relevance of these earlier happenings to the current goings-on.
The ending is something of a tear-jerker, though underplayed and very quietly done, and shows the other side of Spider - emotionally sensitive, thoughtful, fully aware of not only man's foibles but his occasional grandeur, and with something important to impart to his readers. Beyond the jokes, puns, and side-splitting tales, this is what keeps me coming back to Spider, and lifts this book back up from the trough in the middle section to being not only enjoyable but worthwhile.
--- Reviewed by Patrick Shepherd (hyperpat)
Flower
Every possible component that makes up a great piece of fiction is there. Characters - almost more than you can count. individual character back stories - deep and remarkable. The story itself, - superb. Even the alien characters are believable. The physical space and the story line become not just mentally plausible, but physically touchable. No wonder people keep demanding more. Robinson is genius.
Sironynyr
Callahan's Place books and their sequels have become almost predictable, but they're never full. With a joyful combination of puns, pain, and impending disaster, the inhabitants take everything the universe can throw at them and throw it right back. With panache and lots of God's Blessings.
Saberblade
Buckle your seat belts folks. It's gonna be a bumpy ride. Just be forewarned...you can't read just one. I'm off to find the next book. I just wish they were all electronic.
Ydely
Spider is one of the best sf authors there is. I really enjoy his Puns
perfect
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