» » The Changeling Plague

The Changeling Plague ePub download

by Syne Mitchell

  • Author: Syne Mitchell
  • ISBN: 0451459105
  • ISBN13: 978-0451459107
  • ePub: 1895 kb | FB2: 1569 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Science Fiction
  • Publisher: Roc; 1st edition (February 4, 2003)
  • Rating: 4.4/5
  • Votes: 679
  • Format: lit mbr rtf docx
The Changeling Plague ePub download

Syne Mitchell's third book, "The Changeling Plague," is another winner

Syne Mitchell's third book, "The Changeling Plague," is another winner. It starts out as a near-future medical thriller, but quickly takes an unexpected turn, because thankfully Mitchell's more interested in showing the relationship between real viruses and computer viruses than she is in writing yet another tale about How They Isolated the Virus and Saved the Planet. And so, in this tale the vaccine is found rather early on in the novel, after which Mitchell turns her attention to what happens next. Most people demand the virus, of course, while a small percentage do not,.

The Changeling Plague book. In short, author Syne Mitchell has crafted an excellent story, shifting gears partway through to arrive at a thought provoking conclusion. I plan to seek out her first novel, the Compton Crook award winning "Murphy's Gambit," in the near future. Nov 09, 2017 Katelyn Reeves rated it liked it. Honestly, I enjoyed the premise of this book. But I could definitely tell that the author graduated college at 15.

The changeling plague. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

Idaho, however, comes to an unorthodox understanding of the disease, and the upshot of this is a change in the face of human nature.

Find sources: "Syne Mitchell" – news · newspapers · books · scholar .

Find sources: "Syne Mitchell" – news · newspapers · books · scholar · JSTOR (September 2008) (Learn how and when to remove this template message). Syne Mitchell (born 1970 in Jackson, Mississippi) is an American novelist in the science fiction genre. She has a bachelor's degree in business administration and master's degree in physics. She lives in Seattle, Washington and is married to author Eric S. Nylund.

Syne Mitchell (born 1970) is an American novelist in the science fiction genre. The Changeling Plague (2003). The Deathless series. Her first science fiction novel was Murphy’s Gambit which won the Compton Crook Award in 2001.

Syne Mitchell is an American novelist in the science fiction genre  . h2 Works

The changeling plague Close. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Are you sure you want to remove The changeling plague from your list? The changeling plague. Published 2003 by Roc in New York. Cystic fibrosis, Fiction, Genetic engineering, Viral genetics.

Mitchell publishes an online magazine for handweavers, WeaveZine, and produces a monthly podcast, WeaveCast. was canceled by ROC publishing due to "sluggish sales

Mitchell publishes an online magazine for handweavers, WeaveZine, and produces a monthly podcast, WeaveCast. was canceled by ROC publishing due to "sluggish sales. The Last Mortal Man: Book One Of the Deathless ) In the twenty-fourth century, nano-designed biology has turned the world into humanity's playground.

When millionaire Geoffrey Allen injects himself with an experimental virus that has been created to reprogram his DNA and rid his body of cystic fibrosis, the DNA of everyone around him is altered, causing strange new diseases and deformities to emerge and spread throughout the world. Original.
post_name
Syne Mitchell's third book, "The Changeling Plague," is another winner. It starts out as a near-future medical thriller, but quickly takes an unexpected turn, because thankfully Mitchell's more interested in showing the relationship between real viruses and computer viruses than she is in writing yet another tale about How They Isolated the Virus and Saved the Planet.
And so, in this tale the vaccine is found rather early on in the novel, after which Mitchell turns her attention to what happens next. Most people demand the virus, of course, while a small percentage do not, because they like the body modifications the disease can cause (one character wants wings). As for the victims themselves, they're simply quarantined.
There are three main characters: Mitchell's hacker character, Idaho (he wires himself into the net and feeds himself via IV while on line), quickly sees how he can turn his skills from altering the virtual world to altering the real one, by manipulating DNA. He realizes that by doing so he can modify people and he goes about doing just that. The other two protagonists are Lillith, a health worker (she's a save the world type who still wants to keep her day job) who tries to help solve the mystery of the plague while aiding the victims, and Geoffrey, the rich young man who's inadvertently started the whole while looking for a cure for his own cystic fibrosis.
As in "Murphy's Gambit" and "Techogenisis," Mitchell creates interesting characters who don't always make the right decisions. You'll probably find yourself caring about them (one especially effective scene is when Geoffrey, who is kept in quarantine as the "patient zero" of the plague, is transferred to a quarantine facility for other victims--it's his old family estate). Mitchell keeps things moving along briskly and efficiently and the book reaches a satisifying and logical conclusion, with room for a sequel although one isn't inevitable. She also raises some ethical issues that are definitely worth pondering.
kewdiepie
Syne Mitchell is just pure genius. I have bought and read 5 of her novels and wish she was still writing. In fact I have purchased 5 copies of is book alone and gave to friends and family .
Binar
I just finished this book, it was a good read, I recommend it to anyone who likes science fiction plague/virus/medical stories.
Majin
Purchased this book for a friend, she loved it and said it was an excellent read.
VariesWent
Bio-engineering must be an "in" thing to base fiction on these days among hard sci-fi writers the way cyberpunk was for the mid-to-late 90's. The Changeling Plague reminded me of nothing so much as Greg Bear's Darwin's Radio (also an excellent read). Both use a base hypothesis of what would happen if genetic propogation began to do odd things. How would that change us and how would various societies and their governments respond? But while Bear's story hypothesizes it could happen from spontanous mutation due to environmental stresses such as industrial pollution and over-populated regions Ms. Mitchell's novel envisions a world where illegal gene therapy research escapes the control of the scientists conducting it.
As with most novels there are some odd situations. For example, in Ms. Mitchell's novel (as a previous reviewer noted) the world quite understandably has a mass panic (the infection rate climbs to 96% with almost certain death to follow). It is never clear how extensive the damage is beyond a few scenes sketched out showing general public panic. In a world where it is admitted this virus is highly communicable (the author never quite pins down if it's airborn or only transmitted via touch) and mass-panic ensues apparently pizza-delivery boys think they're immune so you can still order delivery knowing it will be at your doorstep a half hour later. And since the story explains earlier that bio-hazard suits sell for thousands of dollars on the black market I doubt pizza-delivery suddenly becomes a lucrative career option. This is only one example of some odd disjunctures. It had the effect of reminding me I was reading a story. Thankfully though it didn't happen often.
If I had to classify it I would say this book is more plot-driven than character-driven. You see the 3 main characters (the medical researcher Lillith, Patient 0 Geoffrey Allen and hacker extraordinaire Idaho Davis) and what they think and how they react to the events around them but unlike some I didn't get a sense of getting to know or understand each character *except* in relation to their handling of the plague and it's consequences on them, their family and friends. This is what I mean about it being more of a plot-driven novel than a character-driven one. Having said that these 3 do get a lot of air-time with everyone else getting bit roles. Using terms of a standard hollywood tv-drama the main 3 carry the novel and get the majority of lines while a few other regulars get a few lines per chapter.
The pacing is also tight. Unlike some novels there isn't a lot of time spent building a backstory that makes people often say of a novel, "it's slow through the first part.". Ms. Mitchell jumps right in and never lets up. It is a fun, entertaining read and the author succeeds overall more often than not. If you are a sci-fi fan give this book a shot.
E-Books Related to The Changeling Plague: