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Ground Zero Man (Corgi science fiction) ePub download

by Bob Shaw

  • Author: Bob Shaw
  • ISBN: 0552103136
  • ISBN13: 978-0552103138
  • ePub: 1602 kb | FB2: 1424 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Science Fiction
  • Publisher: Corgi; paperback / softback edition (1976)
  • Pages: 160
  • Rating: 4.4/5
  • Votes: 975
  • Format: mobi lrf rtf mbr
Ground Zero Man (Corgi science fiction) ePub download

Ground Zero Man. Published 1976 by Corgi Science Fiction. The Peace Machine (Panther Science Fiction). Published January 1987 by Grafton. Mass Market Paperback, 187 pages.

Ground Zero Man. ISBN: 0552103136 (ISBN13: 9780552103138). ISBN: 0586069917 (ISBN13: 9780586069912).

Ground Zero Man is a science fiction novel by British writer Bob Shaw, first published in 1971, and then revised as The Peace Machine in 1985. The plot follows the main character, Lucas Hutchman, an "undistinguished mathematician", who invents a machine that may detonate virtually instantaneously every nuclear bomb in the world, by inducing a "self-propagating neutron resonance"

The Peace Machine (AKA Ground Zero Man). Night Walk (Corgi Science Fiction).

The Peace Machine (AKA Ground Zero Man).

5/5 (Good) Bob Shaw's Ground Zero Man (1971) is a well-told take on a common 50s/60s/70s sci-fi trope - the discovery of technology which could potentially end the omnipresent danger of all out nuclear war. Although the premise is straightforward and simplistic, the main character (Lucas Hutchman) and his motivations are drawn in a convincing manner,.

Used availability for Bob Shaw's Ground Zero Ma.

Ground Zero Man - is a science fiction novel by Bob Shaw, first published in 1971, and then revised as The Peace Machine in 1985.

Literature & Fiction Political Science Politics & Government Politics & Social Sciences Science Fiction Science Fiction & Fantasy Specific Topics War & Peace.

OR TURN THE PLANET INTO A NUCLEAR FURNACELucas Hutchman's life was pretty humdrum. Literature & Fiction Political Science Politics & Government Politics & Social Sciences Science Fiction Science Fiction & Fantasy Specific Topics War & Peace.

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Gay Comics Sci Fi Comics Horror Comics Science Fiction Magazines Book Cover Art Pulp Fiction Fiction Novels Michael Moorcock Classic Sci Fi Books. Book/Magazine Covers (All) – Page 12. Michael Moorcock, The Knight Of The Swords

The Peace Machine (AKA Ground Zero Man). Download (PDF). Читать.

Ground Zero Man is a science fiction novel by Bob Shaw, first published in 1971, and then revised as The Peace Machine in 1985

Ground Zero Man is a science fiction novel by Bob Shaw, first published in 1971, and then revised as The Peace Machine in 1985. The plot follows the main character, Lucas Hutchman, an "undistinguished mathematician", who invents a machine that may detonate virtually instantaneously every nuclear. Ground Zero Man is a science fiction novel by British writer Bob Shaw, first published in 1971, and then revised as The Peace Machine in 1985.

UK 1st Corgi paperback vg+ In stock shipped from our UK warehouse
Leniga
Ground Zero Man (1971, alternatively titled The Peace Machine) comes from a long lineage of fiction revolving around the fear of nuclear destruction, Purple-6 (1962) and Level 7 (1959) to name just two. Ground Zero, however, takes a different spin on the same issue- yes, the fear of nuclear destruction is real... but what is you had the power to force disarmament or detention? Hutchman, our protagonist, holds that power.

A humble mathematician for a missile development company, Hutchman proverbially stumbles upon an equation which causes the excitation of neutrons in nuclear devices, which he calls "making the neutrons dance to a new tune." With this dangerous knowledge, our sheepish scientist begins to construct his device amid concerns from his employer and especially his irrationally jealous wife. Squandering his fortune on the device and his time from work, Hutchman soon sees himself as the fulcrum of a massive seesaw bent on survival or destruction. With diagrammed letters being sent out people of influence, the stage has already been set. If he can stay alive till noon on November tenth, his one decision will change the fate of mankind.

Guffaw you may at the near absurdity of the general plot, the reader can identify and empathize with the twists of fate Hutchman is dealt (his work, his wife, the police, etc). With the best intentions at heart, the ignorant world doesn't seem to understand his undying passion for justice. His plea for the disarmament of the devices is seemingly the only option besides the detention of the same devices -- an assured destruction for every country with nuclear weapons.

Shaw has a gift for language at times, which makes the reading a sheer pleasure: "...he looked downwards through angular petals of glass." (Corgi edition, page 75) or "water droplets crawled along the side-windows like frantic amoebae." (Corgi edition, page 56). His flare for the description of the minute is in contrast to his detail for some greater plot details. This is the main reason for the book being 4-stars rather than 5-stars; some events in the plot are too abrupt, jerky, hastily through in. There are a few spy elements which rise with a fortissimo but only to disappear like the tidal ebb. Red herrings to mislead the reader? It would take an additional 40 pages to the 160-page novel to dull the acuteness of the occasional sforzando.

It's my first Bob Shaw novel so perhaps this kind of thing his "his thing." He's definitely shown his skills in Ground Zero and his other novels may be of interest to me (Ragged Astronauts and The Ceres Solution among them).
Onnell
Bob Shaw's Ground Zero Man (1971) is a well told take on a common 50s/60s/70s sci-fi trope -- technology which could potentially end the omnipresent danger of all out nuclear war. Although the premise is straightforward and simplistic, the main character (Lucas Hutchman) and his motivations are drawn in a convincing manner, the ending is somewhat surprising and dark, and the novel is on the whole characterized by solid prose. At points Shaw does touch on some relavent philosophical points but sadly doesn't pursue them with any concentrated vigor.

If the remarkable cover (naked man bowing before gigantic tower with balancing squished spheroid ringed with raging red sun) peers at you from the shelves of a used book store do not hesitate to pick up a copy -- but, don't go out of your way to track it down unless you enjoy Shaw's other works or salivate uncontrollably over nuclear war related sci-fi.

Brief Plot Summary (limited spoilers)

Lucas Hutchman is a brilliant mathematician stuck in a job way below his talent level developing effective ways of launching missiles carrying warheads. Added to that, Hutchman cares deeply for his wife Valery who's perpetually convinced that he's cheating on her -- frustrating him to no end.

Disillusioned with home life and the state of the world on the brink of nuclear disaster, Lucas develops the mathematics and the schematics for a "self-propagating neutron resonance machine" which would simultaneously detonate every nuclear bomb in the world. The plot thickens (and Lucas' desire to use his device) when guerilla groups acquire a nuclear device which they detonate over Damascus, Syria killing 500,000 people.

Shaw introduces his main philosophical theme at this point (as mentioned above, in very tentative/minimal fashion) -- Hutchman appears to have deep empathy with humanity as a whole -- however, his precise view depends on his wildly swinging mental state. On the other hand Valery, his wife, dismisses the Damascus event because it seems so distant from the problems at hand (especially, the consuming belief that her husband is cheating on her). Valery's moral judgments are bound up in the immediate confines of her world.

Lucas devotes more and more of his time to building the device causing deepening strife with his wife -- as well as various other potentially incriminating incidents with women he meets. Lucas' own decision whether to use the device or not is linked to his personal frame of mind regarding his family life.

The first half of the work describes Lucas' strife at home and the building of the machine. The second half of the work describes him on the run from the authorities after he alerts the world governments about the device. And then there's a plot twist... of sorts...

Final Thoughts

The plot is a by-the-numbers sort of affair. A series of highly improbably (and occasionally silly) coincidences and happenstances propel it forward. However, Shaw adeptly weaves together Lucas' home life into the more general "building the machine" narrative. I found Lucas' character by far the most admirable quality of the work -- although at heart a good man, he allows his emotional frame of mind to influence his desire to use the machine on humanity as a whole.

The interplay between macrocosm (the family and its immediate problems) vs. microcosm (the Damascus incident and the possibility of destroying all nuclear weapons) interplay is at the heart of the novel.

A solid single sitting sort of read...
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