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The Scarlet Plague ePub download

by Jack London

  • Author: Jack London
  • ISBN: 1594628874
  • ISBN13: 978-1594628870
  • ePub: 1585 kb | FB2: 1860 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Science Fiction
  • Publisher: Book Jungle (July 20, 2007)
  • Pages: 80
  • Rating: 4.6/5
  • Votes: 585
  • Format: mobi txt lrf azw
The Scarlet Plague ePub download

Illustrated By Gordon Grant. I. THE way led along upon what had once been the embankment of a railroad. But no train had run upon it for many years.

Illustrated By Gordon Grant. The forest on either sideswelled up the slopes of the embankment and crested across it in a greenwave of trees and bushes. The trail was as narrow as a man's body, andwas no more than a wild-animal runway. Occasionally, a piece of rustyiron, showing through the forest-mould, advertised that the rail and theties still remained.

The plague began tobreak out among the rest of us, and as fast as the symptoms appeared, wesent theĀ . But still the plague raged among us, and room afterroom was filled with the dead and dying.

The plague began tobreak out among the rest of us, and as fast as the symptoms appeared, wesent the stricken ones to these segregated rooms. We compelled them towalk there by themselves, so as to avoid laying hands on them. And so we who were yet cleanretreated to the next floor and to the next, before this sea of thedead, that, room by room and floor by floor, inundated the building.

The Scarlet Plague is a post-apocalyptic fiction novel written by Jack London and originally published in London Magazine in 1912. The story takes place in 2073, sixty years after an uncontrollable epidemic, the Red Death, has depopulated the planet. James Smith is one of the survivors of the era before the scarlet plague hit and is still left alive in the San Francisco area, and he travels with his grandsons Edwin, Hoo-Hoo, and Hare-Lip.

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FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Jack London's post-apocalyptic vision takes place in 2072, sixty years after an uncontrollable plague epidemic has depopulated the planet.

It was listed under science fiction and I thought "Whoa!" London's story was written in 1912, predicts a deadly plague in 2012, and is "narrated" by one of the few survivors-an 87-yr-old former English professor-60 years after civilization's collapse. The world of 2072 is completely feral, with scattered groups of stone-age humans perhaps only numbering a few thousand worldwide

The Scarlet Plague book.

The Scarlet Plague book. The Scarlet Plague, Sunlanders, Master of Mystry, Jack London The Scarlet Plague is a post-apocalyptic fiction novel written by Jack London and originally published in London Magazine in 1912.

THE SCARLET PLAGUE by Jack London 1915 I THE way led along upon what had once been the embankment of a railroad. But no train had run upon it for many years

THE SCARLET PLAGUE by Jack London 1915 I THE way led along upon what had once been the embankment of a railroad. The forest on either side swelled up the slopes of the embankment and crested across it in a green wave of trees and bushes. The trail was as narrow as a man's body, and was no more than a wild-animal runway. Occasionally, a piece of rusty iron, showing through the forest-m.

London published The Scarlet Plague in book form at a point in his career that biographers and critics have called a "professional decline", from September 1912 to May 1916. In this period, he stopped writing short works and shifted to longer works including The Abysmal Brute, John Barleycorn, The Mutiny of the Elsinore, The Star Rover and others.

It was not until after the plague that I learned really to walk. There were not so many now of these human beasts of prey. The plague had already well diminished their numbers, but enough still lived to be a constant menace to us. Many of the beautiful residences were untouched by fire, yet smoking ruins were everywhere. The prowlers, too, seemed to have got over their insensate desire to burn, and it was more rarely that we saw houses freshly on fire.

The Scarlet Plague is a popular book by Jack London. Jack London's The Scarlet Plague consists of 6 parts for ease of reading

The Scarlet Plague is a popular book by Jack London. Read The Scarlet Plague, free online version of the book by Jack London, on ReadCentral. Jack London's The Scarlet Plague consists of 6 parts for ease of reading. Choose the part of The Scarlet Plague which you want to read from the table of contents to get started. Table of Contents for The Scarlet Plague by Jack London. This book contains 21614 words.

Jack London (January 12, 1876 - November 22, 1916), was an American author who wrote The Call of the Wild and other books. A pioneer in the then-burgeoning world of commercial magazine fiction, he was one of the first Americans to make a huge financial success from writing.The Scarlet Plague was written by Jack London and originally published in London Magazine in 1912. It was re-released in February of 2007 by Echo Library. The story takes place in 2072, sixty years after the scarlet plague has depopulated the planet. James Howard Smith is one of the few people left alive in the San Francisco area, and as he realizes his time grows short, he tries to impart the value of knowledge and wisdom to his grandsons.American society at the time of the plague has become severely stratified and there is a large hereditary underclass of servants and "nurses"; and the politcal system has been replaced by a formalized oligarchy. Commercial airship lines exist, as do some airships privately owned by the very rich.
Steamy Ibis
This 1912 story stands among the earliest of "after the collapse" dystopias. In it, Jack London starts with San Francisco of his day - not that different, except for the horses, than it is today. A mysterious plague breaks out, bringing terrible death within hours of its first symptoms - and, of course, incredibly contagious. Polite society quickly degenerates into isolated bands, some together for mutual support, others as predatory wolf-packs. Even a college campus turns into a war zone, with as many dead from gunfire as from disease. As you may imagine, London's writing style works well in conveying the brute savagery.

Some few with natural immunity survive, like the narrator. He tells this story to a few boys from his tribe, descendants of those who survived pestilence and each other. But, the boys' world-view and even language have collapsed, too. They can barely understand the words he uses, can't imagine the society he describes, and frankly don't care. In closing the narrator mentions a cache of books he's placed in a cave, hoping it will help future generations regain civilized status. But that might be millenia away, if it ever comes at all.

-- wiredweird
Nekora
This short novelette of Jack London's, is a radical departure from his usual "he-man" expostulations upon brutal Nature, brutal men, brutal institutions, and, brutal oceans. He had manged Science Fiction, with as much adroitness, just as well, as he did with his usual genres.

It was fascinating to see how he made projections upon the progress of technology, 100 years ahead of his time. Wireless radios being used for routine communications between regular folks; monorails to transport the masses overland; and private luxury zeppelins, for the wealthy to travel.

After this pandemic had culled humanity, by at least 95%, there was an irrevocable descent by humanity into savage barbarity, once they lost their comforts, technology, and institutions, and that is the common thread--of brutality--that this story has, with the rest of London's works.

One should also read George R. Stewart's "Earth Abides" alongside of "Scarlet", as they are both very complimentary to each other.
Hbr
Love the book. I have the Spanish version in cartoon form also from Mexico City 1977 or so. This is a weird edition; the book was always called THE Scarlet Plague. The missing article seems odd, like writing Odd Couple instead of The Odd Couple or Grapes of Wrath instead of The Grapes of Wrath. We are warned that this copied novel with the incorrectly printed title may not be reproduced (in its current format) without the permission of the "publisher" who may be contacted at an email address--this as if there is anyone who would seek to steal the valuable two-spaces-after-a-paragraph format used by the "publisher" who seems to have simply typed the work up for sale on CreateSpace or wherever.
I for one pledge not to steal this valuable formatting. :)
Yayrel
"The Scarlet Plague" is a novella by Jack London that I'd never heard of before searching for recommended books available for free on Kindle. It was listed under science fiction and I thought "Whoa!" London's story was written in 1912, predicts a deadly plague in 2012, and is "narrated" by one of the few survivors--an 87-yr-old former English professor--60 years after civilization's collapse. The world of 2072 is completely feral, with scattered groups of stone-age humans perhaps only numbering a few thousand worldwide. The old professor tells his 3 grandchildren about the world before the plague, and the total collapse of everything. This work is vivid and profoundly pessimistic. If there's a fun part, it's London's portrait of Earth, circa 2012. A population of 8 billion, gross inequities of wealth and power, monorails, dirigibles, wireless communications: not bad for guessing a century ahead. It screams to be adapted to the big or small screen, shooting in today's world and tweaking the story to match. 75 years before this book, Mary Shelley wrote "The Last Man," which some consider the great-granddaddy of post-apocalyptic novels. I'd never heard of that one before reading reviews of "The Scarlet Plague." I wonder if Kindle has it for free...
Grillador
1) This is a novella, not a short story; if you are expecting a thick book, don't go for it, but it's just as long as many published books.
1b) I was shocked to discover that Jack London had written what we'd now call postapocalyptic fiction. The frisson was stronger to realize that the apocalypse was now!
1c) I'd highly, highly recommend this to anyone who enjoys postapocalyptic fiction. I don't know if it's the origin of some of the tropes we often see, but it's definitely an early instantiation of them, and it's kind of heartbreaking.
2) This edition in particular is a beautiful edition of a text that is available online, proofed and corrected. I would much rather read this than any of the free editions for that reason: I find errors distracting and this version has none.
2b) I'm looking forward to the rest of the Radium Age series!
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