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Juniper, Gentian, And Rosemary ePub download

by Pamela Dean

  • Author: Pamela Dean
  • ISBN: 0312859708
  • ISBN13: 978-0312859701
  • ePub: 1670 kb | FB2: 1550 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Fantasy
  • Publisher: Tor Books; 1st edition (June 12, 1999)
  • Pages: 350
  • Rating: 4.5/5
  • Votes: 416
  • Format: mobi docx azw doc
Juniper, Gentian, And Rosemary ePub download

Juniper, Gentian, and Rosemary is a work of fiction. No portion of this book may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, without the express written permission of the author.

Juniper, Gentian, and Rosemary is a work of fiction. All the characters, locations, products, and events are products of the author's imagination, or are used fictionally. Any resemblance to real people, places, things, or events are strictly coincidental. Cover design by David Dyer-Bennet. Published by Blaisdell Press ww. d-b.

I've read several Pamela Dean books in the past, and so I was prepared for her style; it didn't bother me much that people quoted too often, or that the book was long on characterization and mood but short on plot, or that the ending swooped in out of the ether when I was least expecting it. I was ready for those things to be the case, so they didn't disappoint me.

In Juniper, Gentian, and Rosemary, Pamela Dean explores the life of 15-year-old Gentian (the middle of the three titular sisters)-the homework, the Halloween parties with her best friends, the spats with elder sister Juniper

In Juniper, Gentian, and Rosemary, Pamela Dean explores the life of 15-year-old Gentian (the middle of the three titular sisters)-the homework, the Halloween parties with her best friends, the spats with elder sister Juniper. Gentian is a student at an "open" high school, and her telescope and astronomical observations are her paramount interests. A house suddenly appears next door, complete with a darkly handsome boy who speaks only in quotations. Is he interested in Gentian, or Juniper, or even Rosemary?

Juniper, Gentian, and Rosemary.

Juniper, Gentian, and Rosemary. Firebirds Rising: An Anthology of Original Science Fiction and Fantasy . Steven Brust, Pamela Dean, John M. Ford, Gregory Frost, Gene Wolfe, Patricia C. Wrede, Jane Yolen and more of the bestselling writers in fantasy return to the city where wild magics force eve. Points of Departure: Liavek Stories. by Patricia C. Wrede · Pamela Dean. Juniper, Gentian and Rosemary is a 1998 fantasy novel by Pamela Dean

Juniper, Gentian, and Rosemary. Juniper, Gentian and Rosemary is a 1998 fantasy novel by Pamela Dean. It is a retelling of the ballad Riddles Wisely Expounded.

Juniper, Gentian, and Rosemary book. Inspired by a traditional ballad, Juniper, Gentian, and Rosemary is the tale of a mysterious young man and three ordinary young girls, of ancient magic and the modern world.

Juniper, Gentian & Rosemary. by. Dean, Pamela, 1953-. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

The Meriweather sisters-Juniper, 16, Gentian, 14, and Rosemary . After Christmas, Gentian and Dominic begin work on the time machine. Days, or perhaps months, later Gentian realizes that she's become trapped in time

The Meriweather sisters-Juniper, 16, Gentian, 14, and Rosemary, 11-live in a large Victorian house and attend an open school. On the vacant lot next door, a small, red, ugly modern house springs up practically overnight; inexplicably, Gentian, whose room has an observatory for her telescope, finds the house blocking her view and takes the instrument back to the shop. Days, or perhaps months, later Gentian realizes that she's become trapped in time. Clearly, Dominic is not what he seems, and she-ll need all her wiles and some powerful magical help to break free of his baleful clutches.

In Juniper, Gentian, and Rosemary, Pamela Dean explores the life of 15-year-old Gentian (the middle of the . You don't read Pamela Dean books, you fall into them and forget the world. She remembers what it feels like to be a child, and especially what it feels like to be a bright girl.

In Juniper, Gentian, and Rosemary, Pamela Dean explores the life of 15-year-old Gentian (the middle of the three titular sisters)-the homework, the Halloween. Can't wait for her next book.

With her sisters and friends, a young astronomer confronts magic moving into her neighbood.

Inspired by a traditional ballad, Juniper, Gentian, and Rosemary is the tale of a mysterious young man and three ordinary young girls, of ancient magic and the modern world.Three sisters live comfortably with their parents: Juniper, 16, who likes cooking and computer chats; Gentian, 13, who likes plays and astronomy; Rosemary, 11, who likes Girl Scouts. Enter Dominic, handsome as the night, quoting poetry, telling riddles, and asking help for a complex and fascinating science project.Gentian isn't interested at first--she has her own life. But gradually her life, and her time, belong more and more to Dominic and his project, and her father begins to fear that the lad may be more than a charmer. . . .
Kelerius
This is one of my new favorite books. Someone gave it to me almost ten years ago and begged me to read it so they could talk about it, but of course I did not and now regret it. While the pace is slow at first, it steadily builds into some wonderfully crazy plot twists at the end. There are a few long and delightful literary passages from Shakespeare, etc. you can skim as they tend to slow the pace. I plan to delve into them for a reread and will probably amend this review to say don't skim any of it, but the plot holds together just fine if you do. This is a great Autumn read.
Berenn
I picked up The Secret Country Trilogy a couple of months ago and absolutely fell in love with it. I love Dean's writing style, her characters, the story, and the fact that I can re-read it four times (and counting) and still discover things I missed the first time. The point of this digression is that I was highly motivated to seek out other books by this author, and now I almost wish I hadn't. While her characters still had some of the same sparkle, and the vocabulary was refreshingly erudite, this book was somehow lacking in substance and ultimate resolution. I enjoyed the interplay of characters, but there were too many issues that never got wrapped up at the end. At several points during my reading of the book, I had the strangest sense that I'd read the book before, because it all seemed very familiar to me. Upon further reflection, I decided it reminded me of another book I just finished, "Alison, Who Went Away." And quite frankly, that book dealt with many similar themes in a much more satisfactory manner. So if you're looking for a wonderful story with exquisite characters and a satisfying end, skip this one and find a copy of "The Secret Country." You won't be sorry.
Syleazahad
slips almost unnoticed into fantasy. I understand why people found it slow and were frustrated that things don't happen quickly for a long time, but I so enjoyed all the slow parts -- the rich, detailed sense of life in a busy family, the thoughts of a smart girl in high school, the schoolwork, the battles with siblings, that I didn't mind at all. The ending was a bit enigmatic for me, but if I could have given it four and a half stars I would have. Though I didn't think it totally worked, I loved it.
Uleran
As startlingly strange and wonderful as when I read it in high school
RUsich155
I've read several Pamela Dean books in the past, and so I was prepared for her style; it didn't bother me much that people quoted too often, or that the book was long on characterization and mood but short on plot, or that the ending swooped in out of the ether when I was least expecting it. I was ready for those things to be the case, so they didn't disappoint me. I opened the book hoping for a story like Dean's earlier _Tam Lin_, full of interesting characters, with a subtle but looming sense of the supernatural.
I didn't like JG&R as much as Tam Lin, though. For starters, I didn't feel like we got to know Gentian and her friends and family as well as we got to know Janet's circle; I wanted to know more about these people, but I always felt a little like a spectator. Then, I couldn't understand why Gentian liked Dominic. Hormones or no, beauty or no, any self-respecting girl would have become annoyed with him when she noticed that he almost NEVER said anything but quotes (people say the other characters quote too much, but it was Dominic who truly crossed the line). And the annoyance would have turned to revulsion when he made the racist comments about her friend Alma. I just don't buy into Gentian's continuued fascination with him. I would have disliked him intensely. Finally, I agree with the reviewer below who says the ending is unfair to Gentian; she is the one who defeated the evil, but it seems like she is punished rather than rewarded for it.
I had read the relevant ballad, "Riddles Wisely Expounded", before reading JG&R. I'm not sure whether that had a good or bad effect on my reading experience. On one hand, the denouement probably would have made less sense to me if I hadn't read the ballad; on the other hand, it was a spoiler of sorts. I would certainly recommend reading the ballad after reading the book, just to make sense of things. _Tam Lin_ contained a copy of its ballad; I wish this book did as well.
One more comment on Dominic's quoting: Though it made him an extremely annoying character, I did like the possible implications of that move by Dean. If Dominic is in fact the mythological personage he is implied to be, it's tantalizing to think that he is just made up of the thoughts of human beings, accumulated over the years, and has no existence outside of the human imagination. That aspect of the story will definitely stick in my mind for a long time.
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