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Dilvish, the Damned ePub download

by Roger Zelazny

  • Author: Roger Zelazny
  • ISBN: 0345334175
  • ISBN13: 978-0345334176
  • ePub: 1392 kb | FB2: 1120 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Fantasy
  • Publisher: Del Rey (October 12, 1985)
  • Rating: 4.2/5
  • Votes: 151
  • Format: txt lit mbr rtf
Dilvish, the Damned ePub download

WHEN Dilvish the Damned came down from Portaroy they tried to stop him at Qaran, and again at Tugado, then again at Maestar, Mycar, and Bildesh.

WHEN Dilvish the Damned came down from Portaroy they tried to stop him at Qaran, and again at Tugado, then again at Maestar, Mycar, and Bildesh. Five horsemen had waited for him along the route to Dilfar; and when one flagged, a new rider with a fresh horse would replace him. But none could keep the pace of Black, the horse out of steel, for whom it was said the Colonel of the East had bartered a part of his soul. A day and a night had he ridden, to outpace the advancing armies of Lylish, Colonel of the West, for his own men lay stiff and clotted on the rolling fields of Portaroy.

Dilvish, the Damned is a collection of fantasy stories by American writer Roger Zelazny, first published in 1982. Its contents were originally published as a series of separate short stories in various fantasy magazines. Prior to publication, Zelazny's working title for the. Prior to publication, Zelazny's working title for the book was Nine Black Doves. The working title was later re-used for the fifth volume of The Collected Short Stories of Roger Zelazny collection, as a tribute to Dilvish

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Dilvish, the Damned book. As I mentioned above I consider Roger Zelazny to be one of the greatest speculative fiction writers ever to grace us with their works. This collection is not quite on the level with his best writings, but it is still worth reading provided you can find a copy of this hard-to-find book, especially if you are a fan of sword and sorcery genre.

Dilvish, the Damned Mass Market Paperback – October 12, 1982

Dilvish, the Damned Mass Market Paperback – October 12, 1982. by. Roger Zelazny (Author). Find all the books, read about the author, and more. For those of us who have read and re-read the Amber stories, Lord of Light, Doorways in the Sand, Isle of the Dead, and Roger Zelazny's other masterpieces, this light collection of fantasy stories comes as a welcome stopgap. Written in much the same frame of reference as the Amber series, "Dilvish, the Damned" is a set of 11 separate tales about Dilvish, a master swordsman reputedly of Elfish blood, who has escaped from Hell and rides a magical steel horse called Black.

Used availability for Roger Zelazny's Dilvish the Damned

Used availability for Roger Zelazny's Dilvish the Damned. November 1993 : USA Mass Market Paperback.

Chronicles of Amber - Roger Zelazny (2). Dilvish the Damned - Roger Zelazny (2). A Night in the Lonesome October - Roger Zelazny (1). Lord of Light - Roger Zelazny (1). Lord Demon - Roger Zelazny & Jane Lindskold (1). Include Characters. Snuff (Night in the Lonesome October) (1). Merlin (Chronicles of Amber) (1). Luke Rinaldo (Chronicles of Amber) (1).

Dilvish, the Damned is a collection of fantasy stories by American writer . The working title was later re-used for the fifth volume of The Collected Short Stories of Roger Zelazny collection, as a tribute to Dilvish. The storyline begun in this collection was resolved in the novel The Changing Land, which was published before the other Dilvish stories. Dilvish, the Damned - est un roman de fantasy écrit par Roger Zelazny paru en 1982.

Roger Zelazny Jack Of Shadows Some there be that shadows kiss, Such have but a shadow's bliss. Читать онлайн Jack Of Shadows. THE MERCHANT OF VENICEForeword PEOPLE SOMETIMES ASK me whether the title Jack of Shadows was intended to sound like a description of a playing card used in some arcane game, as well as representing my protagonist's name and a matter of geography. Answer: Yes. I've long been fascinated by odd decks of cards, and I had an extensive collect. Some there be that shadows kiss, Such have but a shadow's bliss.

Cogelv
Great book. My dad had it when I was a kid and I always liked reading it over the years. Now I have my own copy. This book isn't on kindle and I haven't been able to find it in stores.
Dellevar
I am not worthy to review Zelazny. I had to replace my paperback copy because I read it once too often and the cover fell off. Great Book.
Yndanol
obscure Zelazny, at least to me (i had missed this one somehow)
worth the read for Zelazny fans
Buzatus
Got this for a Christmas present for my father it's one of his favorite books and he has searched every where for it.it was very good condition when I got it
Jake
For those of us who have read and re-read the Amber stories, Lord of Light, Doorways in the Sand, Isle of the Dead, and Roger Zelazny's other masterpieces, this light collection of fantasy stories comes as a welcome stopgap. Written in much the same frame of reference as the Amber series, "Dilvish, the Damned" is a set of 11 separate tales about Dilvish, a master swordsman reputedly of Elfish blood, who has escaped from Hell and rides a magical steel horse called Black. Four of the stories were originally published in the 1960s, and the others a decade or so later, so it is not surprising that they are only loosely connected. Personally, I don't usually read fantasy because I feel it is not a disciplined enough genre - authors are always free to produce some deus ex machina to rescue their heroes (and their plots). But I make an exception for writers as good as Zelazny, because they impose their own discipline. Even though "Dilvish the Damned" is full of sorcerers and demons, zombies and vampires, magic and spells - as well as the ever-present sword and sandals - it all holds together remarkably well. True, there is no discernible common theme - how could there be when so many of the stories were independently written? - but each is entertaining enough, and the characters of Dilvish and a handful of friends (and foes) are sufficient to bind the collection together. It's best not to read straight through, however, but treat this like a box of chocolates - sample one or two, then put the lid back for a while.
Goldcrusher
Superficially in the form of a novel, this is actually an episodic and open-ended series of sword and sorcery yarns, all featuring Dilvish, a more-or-less decent hero, and his smarter companion, a demonic iron horse named Black, and his ongoing quest for revenge against the evil wizard who once banished him to Hell. The focus, however, is neither on the origins of his quest nor its resolution, but rather upon the adventures along the way.

This was first published in novel format in 1982, so it is sometimes called a "prequel" to 1981's "The Changing Land", which also features Dilvish. I would object to that characterization. These stories were written and published first (as individual stories). Moreover, I thought the ending here was perfect. In my view this is *the* Dilvish Book, and the inferior novel "The Changing Land" is strictly optional.

Zelazny is better known for his AMBER series, but I liked this better. As here, the AMBER books are highly readable, with a good-natured and humorous vibe, but I thought the AMBER series ultimately collapsed under the dreadful weight of Zelazny's too-intimate interest in reality-bending and reality-denying sorcery. I much prefer these stories, more in the style of traditional sword-and-sorcery, wherein the hero himself is not really much of a magician, such that the fantasy remains anchored to a relatively normal center. Dilvish is more interested in slaying wicked sorcerers than emulating them, and even revenge must take a back-seat to rescuing damsels in distress.
Iesha
Normally I don't go for Gonads-the-Barbarian clones, but "Dilvish the Damned" (1982) is a collection of short stories that forms a prequel to "The Changing Land" (1981), which is one of my favorite Zelazny fantasies.

Plus Dilvish the Damned has a very cool demon horse named Black, who supplies most of the brains and brawn in these eleven stories. Dilvish spent a couple of years in hell, courtesy of the evil sorcerer, Jelerak, and his gray matter seems to have gotten a bit scrambled. That makes him easy prey for every sorceress-in-distress who falls his way and/or out of her décolleté dress.

Black is very philosophical about these encounters.

Zelazny tossed off these stories in the midst of writing five of his Amber novels, from 1964 to 1981. Like the Amber novels, there is lots of flashy sword-play, and slightly wittier dialogue than is to be found in most thews-thaumaturgy-and-thwack'em tales. The earlier stories such as "Passage to Dilfar" (1964) and "Thelinde's Song" (1965) tend to be written with the verbs in front of the subjects, as in "...neither were his eyes the eyes of Men," and there are mighty curses within. One of my favorites, to be uttered in the full heat of battle, is "May he thrash in the darkness of the darknesses for the ages of ages."

These stories don't always flow one into another as many were written from year to year for the fantasy magazines. Dilvish acquires an invisible sword and a legion of ghosts in one tale, "The Bells of Shoredan" (1966), loses the legion but keeps the sword in the next, "A Knight for Merytha" (1967). He permanently loses the sword in the following stories (well, it was invisible). I'd recommend "Dilvish, the Damned" (1982) for serious Zelazny fans only, or those who are interested in the prequel to "The Changing Land."
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