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A Scattering of Jades ePub download

by Alexander C. Irvine

  • Author: Alexander C. Irvine
  • ISBN: 0765301164
  • ISBN13: 978-0765301161
  • ePub: 1394 kb | FB2: 1111 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Fantasy
  • Publisher: Tor Books; First Edition edition (July 5, 2002)
  • Pages: 448
  • Rating: 4.8/5
  • Votes: 512
  • Format: txt azw doc lrf
A Scattering of Jades ePub download

Alexander c irvine, . And when a great wise man had spoken well, and taught the people wisdom, they would say on tetepeoac, on chachayaoac; there has been a sowing, there has been a scattering of jades.

Alexander c irvine, . Alexander C. Irvine, . Fray Bernardino de Sahagun, Historia General de las Casas de Nueva España.

A scattering of jades. by. Irvine, Alexander (Alexander . Publication date. The seams of this book are too narrow to be scanned. Fires, Fathers and daughters, Indians of Central America, End of the world, Sideshows, End of the world, Fathers and daughters, Fires, Indians of Central America, Sideshows. New York : Tom Doherty Associates Book.

A Scattering of Jades book. The great fire of 1835 burned most of New York City’s wooden. h and lustrous turquoise, is the heart he shall offer the su. oreLess Show More Show Less.

Alexander Christian Irvine (born March 22, 1969) is an American fantasy and science fiction writer. Irvine was born on March 22, 1969

Alexander Christian Irvine (born March 22, 1969) is an American fantasy and science fiction writer. Irvine was born on March 22, 1969. Irvine first gained attention with his Locus Award-winning 2002 novel A Scattering of Jades (which also won the Crawford Award in 2003) and the stories that would form the 2003 collection Unintended Consequences. He has also published the Grail Quest novel One King, One Soldier (2004), and the World War II-era historical fantasy The Narrows (2005).

Irvine Alexander C. Язык: english. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. 1. A Scattering of Jades.

It is a rare experience when a book I start out to take a quick look at suddenly becomes the one I am reading to the exclusion of all else

It is a rare experience when a book I start out to take a quick look at suddenly becomes the one I am reading to the exclusion of all else. Of course, authors who can pick up a mythology and create a compelling and original story out of it are equally uncommon.

Intelligent and strongly written debut historical-fantasy by a descendant of P. T. Barnum's. Intelligent and strongly written debut historical-fantasy by a descendant of P.

Author A Scattering of Jades. Welcome to Literature Tube Archieve The free online library containing 450000+ books. Read books for free from anywhere and from any device. Listen to books in audio format instead of reading.

What you're hoping for is that pure, cherry high you felt the first time you loaded "Revolver" onto your turntable, but what you get is, well, Klaatu. This is a book that intends to handle large, majestic and monumental events, but in the end it feels cramped and small, as though Irvine could not settle comfortably into the world he created. 6 Personen fanden diese Informationen hilfreich.

The great fire of 1835 burned most of New York City's wooden downtown. Like many people, Archie Prescott thought he had lost everything. His home was a smoldering ruin, his dead wife's body at his feet. And next to her is a child's corpse he assumes was his daughter. It seems like the end of everything.But it is only the beginning.Goaded into action by New York Herald publisher James Gordon Bennett, Archie runs afoul of one of P. T. Barnum's former sideshow workers, Riley Steen. With the help of an ancient book translated by Aaron Burr, Steen has resurrected a chacmool. This ageless Mesoamerican avatar plans to use the blood of Archie's still-living daughter to bring about the end of humanity.At the same time, Stephen Bishop guides tourists through the Mammoth Cave in Kentucky. Stephen, a slave, wants nothing more than a world where the color of his skin doesn't deny his humanity. His fateful first meeting with the chacmool leads him to believe that the promise it offers may bring him to such a world.In the midst of ancient magic and murderous conspiracies, Archie finds himself with the power to save the world or drown it in sacrificial blood . . . but first he has to stop mourning his daughter and undertake a grim cross-country journey to save her.
Terr
Let me tell you where I'm coming from.

I bought Alexander Irvine's "A Scattering of Jades" because of the many reviewers suggesting a story reminiscent of Tim Powers, but I should have known better. That's like buying Klaatu because they sound a little like The Beatles. What you're hoping for is that pure, cherry high you felt the first time you loaded "Revolver" onto your turntable, but what you get is, well, Klaatu. Not that it's bad, it's just not what you wanted.

So I'm giving you permission to disregard this review; as a fan of Tim Powers (Fan? No. Admirer. Devotee. Stalker.) I was hoping for a fully-conceived universe, a true secret history of the world in which we live, an organized and internally consistent system of magic. What I got was "A Scattering of Jades".

This novel really has nothing to do with history, other than taking place in the nineteenth century. Some obvious historical figures pop in from time to time, like Edgar Poe, PT Barnum and Aaron Burr, but their presences are perfunctory, slickly professional rather than enlightening or surprising. The author makes repeated references to Burr's desire to rule the United States, but this idea is merely a jumping off point for the story rather than pivotal information.

The main character, Archie Prescott, is a typesetter for a New York paper who dreams of being a journalist, but the sudden death of his wife and daughter send him spiraling into depression. Sadly, most of this book follows Archie around as he stumbles into trouble again and again, never really rising to the challenges facing him.

The plot, which concerns an evil snakeoil salesman named Riley Steen, is confusing and, ultimately, not very interesting, even though it contains long-dead Aztec gods, killer jaguar mummies and a hilarious zombie named John Diamond who insists on calling Archie "Presto".

The long and short of it: Aaron Burr discovered an ancient text predicting the end of the world and it's rebirth and attempted to use the knowledge in this document in order to make himself King of this new world. The plan failed, but years later Riley Steen, who was one of Burr's co-conspirators but is now a minor traveling magician and purveyor of tonics and potions takes up the call and attempts to re-enact the plan. It is Steen who causes the death of Archie's wife, though he kidnaps Archie's daughter and puts a decoy body in her place. Prescott eventually tumbles to the plan and attempts to rescue his daughter, getting sucked into saving the world as an afterthought.

A likeable character, slave Stephen Bishop, also seems to be an afterthought. He is an expert on the Mammoth Cave, where the jaguar mummy lives, and gets peripherally drawn into the plot, but never takes on a role that justifies the amount of space devoted to him.

This is a book that intends to handle large, majestic and monumental events, but in the end it feels cramped and small, as though Irvine could not settle comfortably into the world he created.
Lahorns Gods
Each year brings a new crop of first novels, many of which are, quite predictably, substandard in terms of quality. Every so often, however, a first novel appears that sets itself apart from the pack; as readers, we experience that special thrill of recognition that announces, "Here is something special." 2002 was unique in that it saw the publication of several novels that provoked such a reaction, among them Alexander Irvine's A Scattering of Jades, Dale Bailey's Fallen Angels, and Glenn Hirshberg's The Snowman's Children.

The best of the three is Irvine's gripping secret history of the United States, which opens with the great New York fire of 1835 and ends in Mammoth Cave circa 1843. In between, it relates the story of newspaperman Archie Prescott who seemingly stumbles on the story of the century, one that centers on the mad ambitions of con man Riley Steen. Believing that great power and influence will accrue to him as a result of his schemes, Steen implements a plan to resurrect the Aztec god Tlaloc. This plan's first step is to animate Tlaloc's avatar, a Mesoamerican mummy known as the chacmool. Once revived, however, the chacmool proves to have a mind of his own, embarking on a journey of death and destruction. Having witnessed the chacmool's bizarre rebirth, Prescott follows the deadly creature across America, eventually coming to realize that their destinies are intertwined.

Masterfully weaving period detail, historical fact, and compelling characters both fictional and real (Edgar Allen Poe, Aaron Burr and P. T. Barnum all make cameos), Irvine creates an absorbing tale whose historical elements are as intriguing as its more fantastic elements. Irvine's imaginative energy brings the period to life in all its gaudy, dirty splendor, detailing a 19th century America whose glorious promise is diminished by the petty schemes and ambitions of the mere mortals who inhabit it. His greatest accomplishment, however, is to have made this tale of the fantastic a very human one, focusing on the passions, ambitions, strengths and failings of his expansive and variegated cast.

Dale Bailey's Fallen is another winner. Set in the isolated mining town of Saul's Run, Pennsylvania, it tells the story of Henry Sleep, a young man who returns to his hometown to bury his father, whom the local police believe took his own life. Not willing to accept this conclusion, Henry begins poking around in his father's affairs. Suspense builds as Bailey artfully raises the stakes, plunging Henry into an investigation that uncovers unwelcome childhood memories and the fantastic secret of a town whose inhabitants almost uniformly live long, untroubled lives.

Although Bailey trods familiar ground in his debut (there are smatterings of works as diverse as IT, Ghost Story, and The Killer Inside Me), he does so with such confidence and bravado that similarities to other books are easily overlooked. At heart a mystery, the book's satisfying payoff is decidedly supernatural, calling to mind William Hjortesberg's Fallen Angel, although not for the reasons you might assume. The build up is slow, slow, slow, but it pays off grandly in the end. Bailey creates a palpable sense of menace and dread, made all the more unbearable due to the readers' increasing involvement with the book's winning cast.

Like Henry Sleep, Mattie Rhodes, the point of view character of Glen Hirshberg's The Snowman's Children, returns to suburban Detroit seeking answers to questions that have plagued him since childhood. Mattie is hoping to reconnect with old friend, Spencer Franklin, who, he hopes, will lead him to yet another friend, Theresa Daughrety. The trio share common backgrounds and, sadly, common traumas. In the late 1970's, they lived through a reign of terror created by the deplorable acts of "The Snowman," a serial killer who, over the course of several winters, abducted and killed several children. The killer's presence had a profound impact on their childhood, and influenced some unfortunate decisions on their part which they still struggle to deal with as adults.

For a first time novelist, Hirshberg displays an extremely deft touch, a sharp eye for detail, and a firm grasp of the delicacy and complexity of human relationships, especially those between youthful friends and between parent and child. It's depressing serial killer subplot aside, The Snowman's Children is at its core a novel about growing up, about either conquering or assimilating the events of childhood so that you can get on with your life. No matter how significant, letting your life be defined by a single event is the ultimate tragedy.

These are the kind of books that keep you reading well into the night; you're actually disappointed to discover you're reaching the end. Yet you can accept this disappointment, cherishing the promise that each author has shown and what that promise augers for the future. The novel is alive and well because writers like Irvine, Bailey and Hirshberg care enough to craft books like these, books with the power to renew our faith in written word.
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