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Soldier of Sidon ePub download

by Gene Wolfe

  • Author: Gene Wolfe
  • ISBN: 0765316641
  • ISBN13: 978-0765316646
  • ePub: 1499 kb | FB2: 1436 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Fantasy
  • Publisher: Tor Books; 1st edition (October 31, 2006)
  • Pages: 320
  • Rating: 4.4/5
  • Votes: 470
  • Format: mbr lit txt mobi
Soldier of Sidon ePub download

Wolfe is best known for his Book of the New Sun series (four volumes, 1980–1983), the first part of his "Solar Cycle".

Wolfe is best known for his Book of the New Sun series (four volumes, 1980–1983), the first part of his "Solar Cycle"

Be warned that books purporting to list all the gods of ancient Egypt do not. Be warned also that there is no such thing as THE Book of the Dead.

Published by Tom Doherty Associates, LLC. 175 Fifth Avenue. Be warned that books purporting to list all the gods of ancient Egypt do not. Books of the dead were what today is called a publishing category. Certain elements are common to all; many more depend on which is consulted. Note too that Egypt (which had no more wolves than any other African nation). had a wolf-god, presumably imported at an ancient date from the Near East.

Читать онлайн Soldier of Sidon.

Gene Wolfe Soldier of Sidon THE AETHIOPIANS WERE clothed in the skins of leopards and lions, and had long bows made of the stem of the palm-leaf, not less than four cubits in length. On these they laid short arrows made of reed, and armed at the tip, not with iron, but with a piece of stone, sharpened to a point, of the kind used in engraving seals. Читать онлайн Soldier of Sidon.

Soldier of Sidon is Gene Wolfe's follow-up to Soldier of the Mist and Soldier of Arete (now packaged as Latro in the .

Soldier of Sidon is Gene Wolfe's follow-up to Soldier of the Mist and Soldier of Arete (now packaged as Latro in the Mist). Yet once more, Mr. Wolfe has been given a scroll with writing on it. Yet once more, the story details the daily adventure of Latro, sometimes known as Lucius or Lewqys, and the people who help Latro and his sword Falcata.

This is not so strange as Beteshu the Panther, but it is strange nonetheless, and I should set it down. The landlord lit our way to the chamber we had rented for the night, and left the lamp with us when he bid us good night. Myt-ser'eu blew out the lamp before taking off her gown. Later, when I woke, it seemed to me our lamp had been of silver, formed like a dove

Soldier of Sidon book. As Sidon opens we find that Latro has been living Gene Wolfe’s third volume of the Soldier series is divorced from the first two in several ways.

Soldier of Sidon book. Latro forgets everything when he sleeps. The most obvious is the fact that it was written 17 years after the last volume, leaving quite a cliffhanger for contemporary readers (and actually no indication that there would even be a sequel).

The third book in the Latro series from science fiction and fantasy master Gene Wolfe, Soldier of Sidon. Writing down his experiences every day and reading his journal anew each morning gives him a poignantly tenuous hold on himself, but his story's hold on readers is powerful indeed. Without his memory, his is unsure of everything, except for his desire to be free of the curse that causes him to forget. The visions Gene Wolfe conjures, of the wonders of Egypt, and of the adventures of Latro as he and his companions journey up the great Nile south into unknown or legendary territory, are unique and compelling.

The gate of the temple wall stood before us. We walked through it, though it was shut. Within were the temple, not large but fine in the way of Kemet, and other buildings.

A Tom Doherty Associates book. The two previous novels, combined in Latro in the Mist (Soldier of the Mist and Soldier of Arete), are generally considered classics of contemporary fantasy. At last we have a new book. Latro now finds himself in Egypt, a land of singing girls, of spiteful and conniving deities, of mysterious dangers.

Latro forgets everything when he sleeps. The two previous novels, combined in Latro in the Mist ( Soldier of the Mist and Soldier of Arete ) are generally considered classics of contemporary fantasy.

Latro forgets everything when he sleeps. Writing down his experiences every day and reading his journal anew each morning gives him a poignantly tenuous hold on himself, but his story's hold on readers is powerful indeed. The two previous novels, combined in Latro in the Mist (Soldier of the Mist and Soldier of Arete) are generally considered classics of contemporary fantasy. Latro now finds himself in Egypt, a land of singing girls, of spiteful and conniving deities. Without his memory, his is unsure of everything, except for his desire to be free of the curse that causes him to forget. The visions Gene Wolfe conjures, of the wonders of Egypt, and of the adventures of Latro as he and his companions journey up the great Nile south into unknown or legendary territory, are unique and compelling. Soldier of Sidon is a thrilling and magical fantasy novel, and yet another masterpiece from Gene Wolfe.
Hamrl
As a huge Wolfe fan, it was always an object of some disappointment to me that the open-ended, episodic glimpses of the soldier Latro seemed, ironically, to be forgotten in the wake of his other novels. Days turned into months, and years, and even approached that most daunting of milestones ... decades. Had Wolfe forgotten his early plans for the amnesiac hero?

I had always been of the opinion (after a re-reading or two) that Latro was in fact an avatar of Pleistorus/Aries, who had been missing from his temple for some time in Soldier of Arete, (and was also revealed to be an incarnation of Ahura Mazda ... and it's only a hop skip and a jump from Ahura Mazda to the God of the Judaic and Christian systems). I was quite eager to see if my suspicions that Latro was a fallen divinity would be instantiated (or to see if Latro's increasing hatred of war would lead to a Christian passivity that would explicate, in bizarre parable form, the change in attitude from the old testament vengeance to the new testament forgiveness of the monotheistic divinity)

I didn't get that in Soldier of Sidon, but I did get a brilliant novel. In the years that have passed, Wolfe has become more econimical, and perhaps less overtly confusing and more satisfying on an initial reading here than in many of his books. He hasn't lost the essence of Latro, and this is what I feared most, for Latro has always been a good "man" who never has enough information to make meaningful judgements. Sometimes he may be right ... and other times he can be misled. This moral dichotomy is sublime, but at the heart of this novel is the wonderful picture of Egypt and its gods - coupled with the basic tragedy of Latro's condition, this is compelling indeed.

The problem for me with identifying with The Wizard Knight was the bullying/childish mentality of Able. Wolfe proves with Soldier of Sidon that he can still write the philosophically compelling mature warrior with a perfect hand. Latro is one of his best characters, and by extension, one of the greatest characters in all of literature.

Read Herodotus, read the Soldier books (Arete is easier going the third time through, believe me), and wonder at the sheer richness of story that Wolfe has tapped in history, to its fullest potential. My only criticism isn't a real one: Wolfe better get to writing that fourth soldier book with an ending like this.
Mr Freeman
A Gene Wolfe novel is always worth reading. I found "Soldier in the Mist" riveting as well as, "Solder of Arete", but found the third installment, "Soldier of Sidon" not up to the visceral, philosophic, symbolic, and sheer enjoyment provided in the previous two books. I was ecstatic when I discovered the third installment would take place in Egypt, but none of the ancillary characters involved my interest, or much of my empathy or concern. Latro seemed sadly diminished, more "leaden" than capturing my interest. His interactions with the other characters were "wooden" and didn't elict much development in discovering himself, or even concern with his plight. His involvement with Egyptian gods was also not as fascinating and plot developing as in the previous novels. Mostly, Latro's introspective thoughts in this installment failed to move the story to anything more than a hint that there would be another installment! Wolfe's writing, so beautifully evocative elsewhere, seemed formulaic, not moving Latro's story to new heights of understanding, wonder, interest,and involvement. Worth the read, but not on par with the previous installments. Latro does not need to find "Falcata", as much as his "spirit".
CrazyDemon
Soldier of Sidon is Gene Wolfe's follow-up to Soldier of the Mist and Soldier of Arete (now packaged as Latro in the Mist). Yet once more, Mr. Wolfe has been given a scroll with writing on it. Yet once more, the story details the daily adventure of Latro, sometimes known as Lucius or Lewqys, and the people who help Latro and his sword Falcata. Instead of being in Greece though, this time Latro is in Egypt and once more he's lost in the Mist and seeing gods.

In Soldier of Sidon, Latro is traveling in Egypt with his friend Muslak and Muslak's ship. They're there to sell the ships cargo and to bring Latro to Riverland (Egypt) to cure his problems. While in Egypt, Latro and Muslak are hired to explore the Nile and trace it as far as they can with the satraps soldiers and representatives. As in his adventures in Greece, some people do take advantage of Latro and others help him because of his innocence. And as always, the gods interact with Latro and guide him, sometimes though, it seems for their amusement rather than to help him.

This book is nicely crafted. There are some changes in style from Latro in the Mist; these changes though come across as if a Latro hasn't written about his life in awhile and has changed slightly. While the story itself isn't up to the level of Soldier of the Mist, I do feel that it is a good sequel to the series as a whole. The one addition I'd make is that I really wish Mr. Wolfe would have included a map of Egypt. While I'm generally familiar with Egypt, I wasn't always familiar with the locations Mr. Wolfe described. Considering everything, Soldier of Sidon is a very solid 4 star book! Don't just read this book though, read the entire series! Btw, I'm hoping that Mr. Wolfe can be "handed" another scroll and we can read more about Latro in the near future!
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