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Palimpsest ePub download

by Aasne Vigesaa,Catherynne M. Valente

  • Author: Aasne Vigesaa,Catherynne M. Valente
  • ISBN: 1441870180
  • ISBN13: 978-1441870186
  • ePub: 1430 kb | FB2: 1991 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Fantasy
  • Publisher: Brilliance Audio; Unabridged edition (August 15, 2010)
  • Rating: 4.7/5
  • Votes: 708
  • Format: mobi lrf lit mbr
Palimpsest ePub download

In Catherynne M. Valente's imaginary realms, stories splinter and. reflect, causing the sweetest sensation of vertigo for th. Washington Post Book World.

In Catherynne M. reflect, causing the sweetest sensation of vertigo for the. reade. . Written with poetic imagination and tremendous skil. alente, like her nameless orphan in the garden, is a captivating storyteller. What Valente has accomplished in this book is far more than a. collection of stories; she has sown the seeds of an entire mythos.

Catherynne M. Valente (Author), Aasne Vigesaa (Reader). Later in the book, however, the sex scenes become less important since the things going on in Palimpsest and in the real world become more important and prominent

Catherynne M. Later in the book, however, the sex scenes become less important since the things going on in Palimpsest and in the real world become more important and prominent. Given the premise that sex is how one gets to Palimpsest, I can't see how she could have avoided having the sex scenes, so I guess they're kind of a necessary "evil" (in quotation marks because I'm not a puritan or whatever).

Listen to unlimited audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. Between life and death, dreaming and waking, at the train stop beyond the end of the world is the city of Palimpsest. To get there is a miracle, a mystery, a gift, and a curse - a voyage permitted only to those who've always believed there's another world than the one that meets the eye. Those fated to make the passage are marked forever by a map of that wondrous city tattooed on their flesh after a single orgasmic night. Valente (Goodreads Author). Catherynne M. Valente (Goodreads Author), Aasne Vigesaa (Narrator). ISBN: 0553385763 (ISBN13: 9780553385762). Published February 24th 2009 by Spectra. Author(s): Catherynne M. ISBN: 1441878718 (ISBN13: 9781441878717).

Narrated by Aasne Vigesaa. Valente (born Bethany Thomas, May 5, 1979) is an American fiction writer, poet, and literary critic. For her speculative fiction novels she has won the annual James Tiptree, Andre Norton, and Mythopoeic Fantasy Awards. Her short fiction has appeared in Clarkesworld Magazine, the World Fantasy Award–winning anthologies Salon Fantastique and Paper Cities, along with numerous Year's Best volumes

Читать бесплатно Palimpsest Catherynne M. Valente. Sato Kenji looked up from his book and into Sei’s eyes. She knew her face was flushed and red-she did not care. Her hands shook, her legs ached.

Читать бесплатно Palimpsest Catherynne M. Fantastist Catherynne M. Valente takes on the folklore of artificial intelligence in this brand new, original novella of technology, identity, and an uncertain mechanized future. IN SPACE EVERYONE CAN HEAR YOU SING A century ago, the Sentience Wars tore the galaxy apart and nearly ended the entire concept of intelligent space-faring life. In the aftermath, a curious tradition was invented-something to cheer up everyone who was left and bring the shattered worlds together in the spirit of peace, unity, and understanding. But she is not alone.

PALIMPSEST CATHERYNNE M. VALENTE Contents Title Page Dedication Epigraph FRONTISPIECE: The Cradle of Becoming and Unbecoming 16th and Hieratica ONE: Sic Transit Tokyo TWO: Cities of the Bees THREE: The Dreamlife of Lock and Key FOUR: The Bookbinder’s Wife Hieratica Street PART I: Incipit Liber de Naturis Bestiarum ONE: The Flayed Horse 125th and Peregrine TWO: The Unhappy Rook 212th, Vituperation, Seraphim, and Alphabet THREE: The Three of Tenement.

Written by Catherynne M. Valente, Audiobook narrated by Aasne Vigesaa. By Erik B. on 05-22-18. The Girl Who Circumnavigated Fairyland in a Ship of Her Own Making. By: Catherynne M. Narrated by: Catherynne M. Length: 7 hrs and 12 mins.

Between life and death, dreaming and waking, at the train stop beyond the end of the world is the city of Palimpsest. To get there is a miracle, a mystery, a gift, and a curse — a voyage permitted only to those who’ve always believed there’s another world than the one that meets the eye. Those fated to make the passage are marked forever by a map of that wondrous city tattooed on their flesh after a single orgasmic night. To this kingdom of ghost trains, lion-priests, living kanji, and cream-filled canals come four travelers: Oleg, a New York locksmith; the beekeeper November; Ludovico, a binder of rare books; and a young Japanese woman named Sei. They’ve each lost something important — a wife, a lover, a sister, a direction in life — and what they will find in Palimpsest is more than they could ever imagine.
Kelenn
I first encountered Catherynne M Valente's work in her fabulous Orphan's Tales series- which I highly recommend. For some reason I was under the impression that Palimpsest was her first novel, but it turns out she wrote it well after Orphan's Tales and to be honest that changes my perception of it a bit. Compared to some of her other work it felt like she was just finding her voice. That's not necessarily a bad quality (it's certainly reassuring to a young person just finding their artistic voice), but it's not what you would expect of something so far into an author's career. Edit: to be clear, I've read a bunch of Valente's work and I actually think Palimpsest is better than her average. I'm just describing certain a quality to the writing here.

Anyway, what I loved: The four main characters were very well developed. Sei, November, and Oleg all had deep and affecting back stories that did a lot to inform their actions later in the story. Ludovico's characterization was a bit weaker, but certainly not bad. I loved the descriptive and metaphorical language though I understand that it's not everyone's cup of tea. The sex/romance elements were not at all heteronormative and there weren't any relationships that seemed obligatory or not justified by the rest of the story. It also doesn't have any sexual abuse or unacknowledged sexism-- annoyingly rare in current media-that-contains-sex-scenes. Contrary to many of the negative reviews, there is a plot, it's just that the plot is unexpectedly simple compared to the complex language it's written in and it's based more in personal discovery than in action. The structure of the plot was very well done. The gender balance seemed pretty equal or even tipped more towards female characters. Most of the characters seemed to be bisexual, so it's not heteronormative, though I know some lesbians who might object that their same-sex-exclusive attraction is being erased by the implication that everyone can be bi- I'm not going to get into those politics here.

Things I didn't like so much: yes, every chapter has a sex scene. The first four chapters (or is it the 2nd-5th? there might be a prologue, I forget) all largely revolve around their respective sex scenes. If I wasn't already familiar with the author or if I didn't trust her I might have put it down after that because personally I find sex scenes boring and overdone and I'm tired of how so much media targeted for adults revolves around sex these days. Later in the book, however, the sex scenes become less important since the things going on in Palimpsest and in the real world become more important and prominent. Given the premise that sex is how one gets to Palimpsest, I can't see how she could have avoided having the sex scenes, so I guess they're kind of a necessary "evil" (in quotation marks because I'm not a puritan or whatever). So I guess just know that if the sex scenes at the start of the book bother you, they will pass.

And no, this isn't erotica. The sex scenes aren't super graphic. They're written in poetic language but not in an especially sexy way. Even for the characters, the sex isn't necessarily especially pleasurable, much of the time their main concern is getting into Palimpsest. To properly appreciate this book you have to be able to take in sex scenes pretty neutrally- without outrage or discomfort and also without expecting to get off on them yourself. I expect this cuts back on who will find the book to their taste.
SlingFire
Palimpsest is the story of a sexually transmitted city, and of four such pilgrims who each encounter the city and find that they need to return. The pilgrims are residents of the world as we-the-readers know it, but Palimpsest is built on fairy logic and surrealism. The author describes the city and its inhabitants with lush language and vivid imagery, anchored by the deep, emotional truths that govern Palimpsest’s world as surely as the laws of physics govern our own. If the mark of a great storyteller is the ability to tell you things you know to be untrue and then make your heart believe in them anyway, then Catherynne Valente is a master of the craft.

The city of Palimpsest thrives on human need. Those who have visited are left with a gut-deep yearning that slowly leaches the color out of the rest of the world. Palimpsest is a compulsion – the kind of desire that the Buddha warned you about. Possibly someone who is perfectly satisfied with their life on Earth would not feel such need to return as the four protagonists do, but perfection is boring; the flaws and scars and traumas that the characters carry back and forth between our world and Palimpsest are as compelling as the city itself, and just as richly detailed. Palimpsest and all its wonders draw the readers into the book and tantalize us with possibilities, but ultimately it’s the loss and need and loneliness of November, Ludovico, Sei, and Oleg that compel us to stay and see their journey through to the end. Along the way we get to make sense of Palimpsest itself, as the disparate, absurd details we have learned get slowly and satisfyingly knotted together into a cohesive whole.

I could say so much more about the book, but ultimately my own words will fall short, and if you haven’t read it you deserve the opportunity to discover all of Palimpsest’s secrets for yourself.
Mezilabar
I was surprised by how bad this book is. I really liked this author's western reimagining of Snow White, my kids read her fairy tale, and I recently saw this listed on a reputable website as one of the 100 best fantasy novels of all time. As you know by now, it is the story of an alternate fantasy world that one may reach only by having sex with someone who has been there, and who is marked with a tattoo. But every fantasy novel has some way of reaching the imaginary world at issue - a wardrobe, for example - and so this is really just a gimmick. Once we get to the imaginary world, how good is the story. Well, in this case, not very good, just sort of overblown formless descriptions with no driving plot, and an overuse of the word "great" instead of "big." If I had to describe a plot, I guess I would say it's about a group of farflung characters, each of which is trying to gain permanent entry to a mysterious, sexual dreamworld. The problem is this: Everyone wants to get there, but it's not clear why; it's a pretty wretched, sadistic place, and the characters go through all manner of hell there, from full-body bee stings to dismemberment (fingers and tongues). I wouldn't voluntarily lose my tongue to live in a penthouse overlooking Central Park, and I definitely wouldn't lose my tongue to get a pad in the horrible fantasy world described in this book. There are some nice characterizations and diversions along the way, but the central conceit is not successful.
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