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Lord of the Isles (Lord of the Isles, 1) ePub download

by David Drake

  • Author: David Drake
  • ISBN: 0613173511
  • ISBN13: 978-0613173513
  • ePub: 1439 kb | FB2: 1955 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Fantasy
  • Publisher: Bt Bound (October 1999)
  • Rating: 4.3/5
  • Votes: 388
  • Format: lrf lrf doc txt
Lord of the Isles (Lord of the Isles, 1) ePub download

The Lord of the Isles (Scottish Gaelic: Triath nan Eilean or Rìgh Innse Gall) is a title of Scottish nobility with historical roots that go back beyond the Kingdom of Scotland.

The Lord of the Isles (Scottish Gaelic: Triath nan Eilean or Rìgh Innse Gall) is a title of Scottish nobility with historical roots that go back beyond the Kingdom of Scotland. It emerged from a series of hybrid Viking/Gaelic rulers of the west coast and islands of Scotland in the Middle Ages, who wielded sea-power with fleets of galleys (birlinns).

Lord of the Isles book. People would ask Hey RJ, what’s that book about? and I was never Lord of the Isles by David Drake By RJ Jenson

Lord of the Isles book. People would ask Hey RJ, what’s that book about? and I was never Lord of the Isles by David Drake By RJ Jenson. It didn’t work, and I was stuck with a book that I was only sort of interested in.

84 beğenme · 63 kişi bunun hakkında konuşuyor · . 29 kişi buradaydı . Lord of the Isles Pub and Restaurant  . The 4th Scottish Hospitality Awards 2019.

The world will end but love and music endureth.

Unlike most modern fantasy, David Drake's Lord of the Isles is an epic with the texture of the legends of yore, with rousing action and characters to cheer for. ―Terry Goodkind.

view Kindle eBook view Audible audiobook. Unlike most modern fantasy, David Drake's Lord of the Isles is an epic with the texture of the legends of yore, with rousing action and characters to cheer for. True brilliance is as rare as a perfect diamond or a supernova. Lord of the Isles is truly brilliant.

David Drake’s fantasy Lord of the Isles series is a towering epic of heroic adventure set in an extraordinary and colorful world where the elemental forces that empower magic are rising to a thousand-year peak

David Drake’s fantasy Lord of the Isles series is a towering epic of heroic adventure set in an extraordinary and colorful world where the elemental forces that empower magic are rising to a thousand-year peak. Garric or-Reise was born the son of an innkeeper, but he is actually the progeny of Valence III, King of the Isles, and heir to the throne. But the kingdom is weak and evil magic infects the land.

LORD OF THE ISLES By David Drake

LORD OF THE ISLES By David Drake. PROLOGUE Tenoctris the Wizard paused on the spiral stairs to catch her breath and twitch a strand of gray hair back behind her ear. The crowd in the courtyard below cheered wildly: the Duke of Yole and his advisors must have come out of the palace to tell his people of the victory that rumor had already proclaimed. Six months ago Tenoctris would have been one of the inner circle standing with the duke on the palace steps. The Hooded One had replaced her in Duke Tedry's favor. Tenoctris sighed and resumed her climb.

A series of books by author David Drake. In 1997, Drake began his largest fantasy series, Lord of the Isles, using elements of Sumerian religion and medieval era technology

A series of books by author David Drake. In 1997, Drake began his largest fantasy series, Lord of the Isles, using elements of Sumerian religion and medieval era technology. The series consists of nine books broken into two distinct parts, the Lord of the Isles consisting of the first six books, and a final trilogy dubbed the Crown of the Isles. YouTube Encyclopedic. Nonnus or-Bran (A quiet hermit close to Sharina). King Carus (The ancient king who dwells in Garric's mind). Lord Waldron (commander of the Army) bor-Warriman. Lord Tadai (Lord Chamberlain) bor-Tithain. Lord Royhas (Lord Chancellor) bor-Bolliman.

Edinburgh: Printed for Archibald Constable and Co. Edinburgh; and Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown; By James Ballantyne and Co. Edinburgh. The Lord of the Isles started life in 1811 as Scott was looking for a potentially lucrative poetical subject to cover the cost of building his new home at Abbotsford. He initially felt that a poem on the wanderings of Robert the Bruce would meet his purpose.

Brakree
The Lord of the Isles is a good ol' Tranter tale. We see the Scottish Isles through the eyes of Somerled hammer of the Vikings and first true lord of the Isles. The book starts with Somerled, part Viking and part Scot using Irish mercenaries from his Father-in-Law and his Long ships to slowly reclaim his father's Thanedom of Argyll. After accomplishing this and taking a few more Islands, Somerled's father dies and he becomes Thane of Argyll. Then after becoming involved with the Isle of Man and marrying the King of Man's daughter Ragnhilde, he takes back most of the remaining Isles from the Vikings and declares himself King of Argyll and the Isles. Since his power rises he comes to the notice of David I, King of Scots. He meets David and befriends him. Seeing himself as equals but declaring fealty to David I out of respect, Somerled settles down to rule his northern Kingdom. By his new wife he father's sons who become the founders of the MacDougall, MacDonald and MacRauri clans. But unrest with rebellion against David's rule and the rise of the MacEth claimants to the throne tests his loyalty to the King of Scots. After the death of his friend David I and meeting Malcolm, the Maiden, grandson and heir to the throne Somerled chooses to support the rebellion work to put Scotland back on track. This leads to his treacherous murder at the height of his power. Lord of the Isles is a great view of who and what Somerled may have been. He is the ancestor of future great clans, the Stewart royal dynasty and impacts Scottish history as few have. Nigel Tranter has written a wonderful tale.
Grinin
Couple of caveats first: I am of Scots decent, primarily from the Western Isles and a member of Clan Donald, and I visited the area last year. So, I had a keen interest in the subject. I am also a big fan of Nigel Tranter and really enjoyed the Wallace and Bruce books he wrote. Lastly, I really enjoy military-centric historical fiction.

I found this to be an enjoyable read even though I knew how it ended. Unlike the Wallace and Bruce books, only Somerled, the protagonist, gets any real character development. So, it is really about him with some role players in support.

So, if you are a fan of Celtic Scotland, are interested in the Norse influence on Scotland and enjoy sea-faring and military adventure you should enjoy this. If you are looking for strong female characters (although Ragnhilde is one of Tranter's strongest female characters I have encountered), a balanced account of Norman / Celtic Scotland or intense character / relationship studies this book is not for you. The Wallace and Bruce books are much better (and they should be read in that order as you get two very different views of the same events which I found really interesting.)
Neol
This book was a fun journey into what it might have been like to be one of Somerled's crew - fighting to restore order to 12th century Scotland - warding off Norse Raiders as well as English lords. I enjoyed it and I think it's a good semi-non-fiction work.

However, I was disappointed that there wasn't any emotional or psychological depth to the story. We never learn what motivates Somerled, or what he thinks about or why he's giving his life to his cause. Sure, we can assume and guess, but it would have added a lot to the story to have journeyed inside his heart and mind in addition to his ships.

I'm still glad I read it, though.
JoJolar
I kept hearing "descended from the great Somerled" and wondered who he was. This book answered that question in very engaging style. Having just watched the Brother Cadfael series, I was very interested when Tranter brought in the other leading players of the time: King David of Scotland, Empress Maud, and King Stephen of England. It helps to have the broader context of the time period. Sadly, the tale came to a rather abrupt tragic end.
Gozragore
I could read this guy FOREVER. He's historically correct and yet fleshes these historical families out brilliantly. If you love All things Celtic, you need to read this guy.
The Sinners from Mitar
Never heard of Tranter, or of Somerled. Excellent book, a little too long for my taste, but never boring. This is historical fiction at its best. I cannot wait to read the other eighty books this man wrote.
Xal
I have to admit personal bias as I am a descendent of Somerled through my mother. However, Tranter provides another excellent tale of Scottish history in this view of the beginning of a principality that would be an independent nation for 700 years before merging with Scotland as the islands of the Hebrides and the Western Highlands.
All of his books are full of lots of adventure. I really like them. I also like his character development. They seem like real people.
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