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Transatlantic: Samuel Cunard, Isambard Brunel, and the Great Atlantic Steamships ePub download

by Stephen Fox

  • Author: Stephen Fox
  • ISBN: 006095549X
  • ISBN13: 978-0060955496
  • ePub: 1893 kb | FB2: 1865 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Transportation
  • Publisher: Harper Perennial (June 29, 2004)
  • Pages: 544
  • Rating: 4.3/5
  • Votes: 218
  • Format: doc docx lrf mobi
Transatlantic: Samuel Cunard, Isambard Brunel, and the Great Atlantic Steamships ePub download

Fox, Stephen R. Publication date. Books for People with Print Disabilities.

Fox, Stephen R. Relates the history of the transatlantic steamship from the viewpoints of the people who built and ran them, describing the impact of the steamship on transatlantic commerce as well as the disasters that marked steamship development. Internet Archive Books.

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The great transatlantic steamships became emblems of an age, of a Victorian audacity of spirit-cathedrals .

The great transatlantic steamships became emblems of an age, of a Victorian audacity of spirit-cathedrals to man's harnessing of new technology. Through the innovations and designs of key engineers and shipping magnates – Samuel Cunard, Isambard Kingdom Brunel and Edward Knights Collins – ‘the largest movable objects in human history' were created. To the wealthy, steamships represented glamorous travel, but to most they offered cheap passage out of Europe to the New World

An epic social history of steamship travel from the 19th-century to the 'Lusitania', the 'Mauretania' and the 'Titanic'

An epic social history of steamship travel from the 19th-century to the 'Lusitania', the 'Mauretania' and the 'Titanic'. The great transatlantic steamships became emblems of an age, of a Victorian audacity of spirit-cathedrals to man's harnessing of new technology. Through the innovations and designs of key engineers and shipping magnates - Samuel Cunard, Isambard Kingdom Brunel and Edward Knights Collins - 'the largest movable objects in human history' were created

In Transatlantic, the experience of crossing the Atlantic is re-created in stunning detail from the varied perspectives of. .

In Transatlantic, the experience of crossing the Atlantic is re-created in stunning detail from the varied perspectives of first class, steerage, officers, and crew. The dynamic evolution of the Atlantic steamer is traced from Brunel's Great Western of 1838 to Cunard's Mauretania of 1907, the greatest steamship ever built. Set against the classic tension of modern technology contending with a formidable natural environment, the story is rife with disasters. The key element is steam power: the universal, magical, transforming microchip of the nineteenth century.

The first Atlantic steamship race, contrived and unequal, was under way. brunel had provided Hosken with an. brunel had provided Hosken with an engraved Mercator-projection chart of his great circle route, marked with bearings and soundings, to help keep the ship on the fastest course. Cunard went to England early in 1839 because the British government had declared its intention to subsidize steam navigation between England and America, not to carry passengers or cargo (except incidentally) but mainly to transport the mail, that most essential tool of commerce and empire. The Great Western, by her five routine round-trip voyages in 1838, had shown the possibilities of regular transatlantic steam.

Transatlantic : Samuel Cunard, Isambard Brunel, and the Great Atlantic Steamships. Charles Dickens took one of the new-fangled Cunard steamers from England to Boston in 1842, and wrote a funny, famous article about how it was noisy, cramped, and boring

Transatlantic : Samuel Cunard, Isambard Brunel, and the Great Atlantic Steamships. Charles Dickens took one of the new-fangled Cunard steamers from England to Boston in 1842, and wrote a funny, famous article about how it was noisy, cramped, and boring. It was bad enough that on the return trip, he took the slow traditional sailing packet

With Samuel Cunard, founder of the line, on board, the Britannia laboured across the ocean against head winds . And at the centre of it all, driving and organizing, the elusive figure of Samuel Cunard and the great transatlantic steamship line he founded

With Samuel Cunard, founder of the line, on board, the Britannia laboured across the ocean against head winds and adverse currents. Ten days out, an iceberg was sighted in the near distance: a reminder of the North Atlantic’s perils. The ship was scheduled to depart from Liverpool a few days before the fourth, and she was therefore expected in Boston by the fourteenth. When that day passed without the Britannia, people in Boston started worrying. And at the centre of it all, driving and organizing, the elusive figure of Samuel Cunard and the great transatlantic steamship line he founded 11 След.

Canadian entrepreneur Samuel Cunard and British engineer Isambard Brunel independently recognized how difficult achieving such a goal would be, writes Fox (Big Leagues, 1994): the technology of steam-driven engines, introduced a generation before, was certainly perfectible an.

Canadian entrepreneur Samuel Cunard and British engineer Isambard Brunel independently recognized how difficult achieving such a goal would be, writes Fox (Big Leagues, 1994): the technology of steam-driven engines, introduced a generation before, was certainly perfectible and adaptable to the task, but the Atlantic Ocean posed its own challenges in the form of huge storms and swift currents; the Atlantic. to America, Cunard remarked, is the worst navigation in the world. The westerly winds prevail very much, and you have ice and fog to contend with

The great transatlantic steamships became emblems of an age, of a Victorian audacity of spirit-cathedrals to. Through the innovations and designs of key engineers and shipping magnates-Samuel Cunard, Isambard Kingdom Brunel and Edward Knights Collins-'the largest movable objects in human history' were created. The examination of the history of the rise of the transatlantic liner is both sequential (. longitudinal) and cross-sectional (latitudinal).

During the nineteenth century, the roughest but most important ocean passage in the world lay between Britain and the United States. Bridging the Atlantic Ocean by steamship was a defining, remarkable feat of the era. Over time, Atlantic steamships became the largest, most complex machines yet devised. They created a new transatlantic world of commerce and travel, reconciling former Anglo-American enemies and bringing millions of emigrants who transformed the United States.

In Transatlantic, the experience of crossing the Atlantic is re-created in stunning detail from the varied perspectives of first class, steerage, officers, and crew. The dynamic evolution of the Atlantic steamer is traced from Brunel's Great Western of 1838 to Cunard's Mauretania of 1907, the greatest steamship ever built.

Beydar
A fairly interesting history of the evolution of steam powered shipping, with a focus on the growth of shipping across the Atlantic. I would not normally have read this, but it was recommended by a senior member of my company as a good example of risk versus rewards in business and I enjoyed it more than I anticipated. I would recommend it as a worthwhile book.
Shalinrad
I bought this book hoping to find pictorial information on the early transatlantic steamers, especially Brunel's Great Eatsren. So my initial reaction was one of disapointment when the book arrived...but then I started reading it, and Mr Fox has managed to write a compelling book, which gives a lively and yet technically interesting account of the history of the 19th Century transatlantic steamships and lines. All in all I enjoyed reading the book throughout...Where the dispointment comes is at the end, when the book enters the 20th Century. The part on RMS Mauretania is scarce, to say the least, and the book seems to ignore the White Star line endeavour altogether. On a more chauvinistic point of view, the book ignores radically the French line, or for that matter the Italian line. It is true that France was in a different position than say Ireland, Great Britain, Germany, Italy or Central Europe as far as emigration is concerned. Which is why the French line was not so much about transporting immigrants than tourists. But, in the time span covered by the book, the French line produced some very interesting ships (the Touraine for instance). A pity this is dismissed completely by Mr Fox...In conclusion, Mr Fox makes reading history enjoyable, and that is no mean feat. The book makes for compelling reading, but some choices of the author do not reflect a totally balanced view of the period (now which historian does?...). The title and more certainly the illustration on the cover are a bit misleading as to the true content of the book, but it is worth reading from the firts to the last page.
Tygokasa
This is one of those books with a great beginning and a disappointing middle and ending game. Well written and full of details in a number of issues, it also has an uncredible number of holes. All in all, it seems to have been finished in a hurry as if after a leisurely previous writting, in a sudden the editor called the author and remembered him about the deadline.
In a book dedicated to transatlantic navigation it is simply unacceptable you does not get a word about France, that also was a player in it and even developped some revolutionary design technologies that culminated in the "Normandie". You cannot let this issue outside IF you precisely have written so long about technicalities as Fox did. Also, as a reader, you does not get a word about the parallel developpement of men' o war kind of ships. And what happened to the industry in the 30 and 40's, 50's and 60's and so on? Not a word. Not even the Titanic episode is mentioned. Yes, there are number of books about it, but nevertheless if you are talking of White Star line and its competence along all the book, or almost, you just cannot presume nothing.
So, full of holes and aparently finished in a hurry, the book entertains and teach you up to half of it, but then, first at an slow pace and then at an accelerated one, decline comes and sink the reader in certain boredom and disappointment
A pity.
Fecage
I haven't quite read the entire book yet, and I don't have time right now to write a comprehensive review, but I did want to say that this book is a great read and would be appreciated by anyone with the slightest interest in ships. It is also very impressively researched - Fox's in-depth research puts many so-called specialist historians to shame. I am almost ashamed of the fact that I only paid a dollar for a new copy of this book, which is far less than I've paid for many history books that aren't a fraction as entertaining or informative as this one. I see you can still get it for scarcely more than a buck secondhand and it's an absolute steal at that price, and indeed very good value for the hardback even at full price.
Fenrikree
Very good history of Trans Atlantic passenger service. Easy to read and informative.
Grosho
Bought this AFTER I bought the history of the White Star line. This is much more appealing, from the paper to the pictures, a quality work. The writing style is lively and easy to read. This book traces the history of transatlantic travel from the days of the sailing packet to the height of the glory of the first Mauretania. An entertaining and enlightening must read for the ocean liner or transportation buff.
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