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Antioxidative Compounds of Rapeseed Oil By-products for Stabilization of Rapeseed Bulk Oil and Emulsions (Berichte Aus Der Lebensmitteltechnologie) ePub download

by Usha Thiyam

  • Author: Usha Thiyam
  • ISBN: 3832244301
  • ISBN13: 978-3832244309
  • ePub: 1308 kb | FB2: 1744 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Engineering
  • Publisher: Shaker Verlag GmbH, Germany (September 26, 2005)
  • Pages: 156
  • Rating: 4.3/5
  • Votes: 217
  • Format: docx lit mbr lrf
Antioxidative Compounds of Rapeseed Oil By-products for Stabilization of Rapeseed Bulk Oil and Emulsions (Berichte Aus Der Lebensmitteltechnologie) ePub download

Thiyam, . Antioxidative Compounds of Rapeseed Oil By-products for Stabilization of Rapeseed Bulk Oil and Emulsions, P. Thesis, University of Kiel, Kiel, Germany, 2005.

Thiyam, .

Oil cakes were prepared from commercial rapeseeds of the double-low . The phenolic profile of rapeseed meal was determined by an HPLC method

Oil cakes were prepared from commercial rapeseeds of the double-low Bolko variety using a complete technological line. Methanolische Extrakte der Öle enthielten phenolische Verbindungen, die in der Lage waren, den oxidativen Abbau von Ölen zu verzögern. The phenolic profile of rapeseed meal was determined by an HPLC method.

Rapeseed oil composition is determined by GCMS. Increased antioxidant activity of rapeseed oil with powders supplementation is evidenced. Vegetable powders can offer effective alternative to synthetic antioxidants during frying and storage of rapeseed oil. Rapeseed oil oxidative stability is investigated. Rapeseed oil composition is determined by GCMS. View.

Natural rapeseed oil contains 50% erucic acid

Natural rapeseed oil contains 50% erucic acid. Wild type seeds also contain high levels of glucosinolates (mustard oil glucosindes), chemical compounds that significantly lowered the nutritional value of rapeseed press cakes for animal feed. Biodiesel may be used in pure form in newer engines without engine damage and is frequently combined with fossil-fuel diesel in ratios varying from 2% to 20% biodiesel. Owing to the costs of growing, crushing, and refining rapeseed biodiesel, rapeseed-derived biodiesel from new oil costs more to produce than standard diesel fuel, so diesel fuels are commonly made from the used oil.

Rapeseed oil. Oil extracted from rapeseeds (Brassica napus . Brassica rapa L. and Brassica juncea . and their crosses) from varieties having a low content in erucic acid and glucosinolates. Other name: canola oil (for North American rapeseed varieties). Averages as fed, on DM, other unit Min/max as fed Min/max on DM Min/Max other unit.

Processing of rapeseed for oil production produces rapeseed meal as a. Thiyam-Holländer, Usha; Eskin, Michael; Matthäus, Bertrand (2013).

Processing of rapeseed for oil production produces rapeseed meal as a byproduct. The byproduct is a high-protein animal feed, competitive with soybean. The feed is employed mostly for cattle feeding, but also for pigs and chickens.

Rapeseed oil by-products with. antioxidative potential. International Conference on Green Chemistry, Poitiers

Rapeseed oil by-products with. International Conference on Green Chemistry, Poitiers, France. 28. Thiyam, U. & Schwarz, K. (2001). Extraction from Rapeseed Oil By-products. DAAD Bioforum, Berlin, Poster presentation.

Fully refined rapessed oils of high (regular rapeseed oil, B. campestris) and low erucic acid content (Span oil, B. . campestris; commercially hydrogenated Span oil and Zephyr oil, B. napus) and soybean oil were fed to male and female Sprague-Dawley rats at a level of 15% by weight in the diet. Body weight gain was not influenced by the dietary treatments in experiment 1. However, in experiment 2 the groups fed the diets containing regular rapeseed oil or Span oil showed significantly (P less than . 5) lower body weight gains when compared to soybean oil fed groups but not when compared to the hydrogenated Span or Zephyr oil fed groups.

Rapeseed Oil Methyl Esters (RME) as Fuel for Urban Transport. By Jerzy Merkisz, Paweł Fuć, Piotr Lijewski and Miłosław Kozak. Plant-based oils suitable for production of fuels are obtained not only from rapeseed but also from sunflower, soy, peanuts, oil palm, linseed or hemp. The history of application of plant-based oils for fuelling of combustion engines dates back to the times of the first diesel engines – Rudolf Diesel used peanut oil for his engines.

Primary emulsions were prepared by mixing rice bran oil with anionic polysaccharide, pectin, at pH 4 or 7. Zein .

Final concentration of secondary emulsions was 20% (w/w) rice bran oil, 2% (w/w) pectin and . % (w/w) zein.

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