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Faster, Better, Cheaper: Low-Cost Innovation in the U.S. Space Program (New Series in NASA History) ePub download

by Howard E. McCurdy

  • Author: Howard E. McCurdy
  • ISBN: 0801867207
  • ISBN13: 978-0801867200
  • ePub: 1320 kb | FB2: 1209 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Engineering
  • Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press; First Edition edition (December 26, 2001)
  • Pages: 192
  • Rating: 4.3/5
  • Votes: 530
  • Format: rtf docx lrf azw
Faster, Better, Cheaper: Low-Cost Innovation in the U.S. Space Program (New Series in NASA History) ePub download

His new book, Faster, Better, Cheaper, is the first scholarly attempt to explore NASA's transformation from one in. .During the early 1990s NASA undertook a set of low-cost space science mission that became known as the "faster, better, cheaper" program.

His new book, Faster, Better, Cheaper, is the first scholarly attempt to explore NASA's transformation from one in which large-scale space science projects were the norm into one in which projects that are smaller, less expensive, and generally less expansive rule the day. McCurdy offers an excellent introduction to NASA's new management approach and points to further understanding and evolution.

Start by marking Faster, Better, Cheaper: Low-Cost Innovation in the . Space Program as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. In Faster, Better, Cheaper: Low-Cost Innovation in the . Space Program, Howard E. McCurdy examines NASA's recent efforts to save money while improving mission frequency and performance

NASA Administrator Daniel S. Goldin adopted the faster, better, cheaper initiative in 1992 to shorten schedules .

NASA Administrator Daniel S. Goldin adopted the faster, better, cheaper initiative in 1992 to shorten schedules, improve results, and operate at less cost. The initiative required simplification, miniaturization, downsizing, teamwork, and shortened schedules. Behind the faster, better, cheaper initiative were forty years of experience with the reusable space shuttle and with big, expensive, and nonreusable vehicles like the Titan IVB launch vehicle and the Viking spacecraft.

Howard E. McCurdy, Faster, Better, Cheaper: Low-Cost Innovation in the . Space Program (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2001), 9; Liam Sarsfield, Cosmos on a Shoestring (Santa Monica, CA: RAND, 1998); David A. Bearden, A Complexity-Based Risk Assessment of Low-Cost Planetary Missions: When Is a Mission Too Fast and Too Cheap? paper delivered at the. Fourth IAA International Conference on Low-Cost Planetary Missions, JHU/APL, Laurel, MD, May 2–5, 2000.

In Faster, Better, Cheaper: Low-Cost Innovation in the . McCurdy examines NASA's recent efforts to save money while improving mission frequency and performance.

McCurdy, Howard . Faster, Better, Cheaper: Low-Cost Innovation in the . Space Program, Johns Hopkins University Press, 2001. McCurdy, Howard . Space and the American Imagination, Smithsonian Institution Press, 1997, ISBN 978-1-5609-8764-2. "Profile Howard McCurdy". Retrieved 22 September 2012.

New series in NASA history. In "Faster, better, cheaper: low-cost innovation in the . ISBN, ISSN, EAN : 978-0-8018-6720-0. space program", Howard E. Faster, better, cheaper" takes its title from the initiative of the same name, which officials at NASA adopted after the high-profile failure of the Mars Observer spacecraft in 1993.

Faster, Better, Cheaper: Low-Cost Innovation in the . If a single phrase can be used to identify NASA in the 1990s, it would almost certainly be faster, better, cheaper. NASA administrator Dan Goldin pushed the idea of doing science missions on shorter schedules and smaller budgets than the massive flagship missions like Galileo and Cassini throughout his record tenure at NASA. His first book on space policy chronicled the history of The Space Station Decision. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press. McCurdy, Howard E. 1997. Space and the American Imagination. Washington,DC: Smithsonian Institution Press. Howard E. McCurdy, professor of public administration and policy in the School of Public Affairs, specializes in space policy, the organizational culture of NASA, public administration, and American politics.

In Faster, Better, Cheaper: Low-Cost Innovation in the U.S. Space Program, Howard E. McCurdy examines NASA's recent efforts to save money while improving mission frequency and performance. McCurdy details the sixteen missions undertaken during the 1990s―including an orbit of the moon, deployment of three space telescopes, four Earth-orbiting satellites, two rendezvous with comets and asteroids, and a test of an ion propulsion engine―which cost less than the sum traditionally spent on a single, conventionally planned planetary mission. He shows how these missions employed smaller spacecraft and cheaper technology to undertake less complex and more specific tasks in outer space. While the technological innovation and space exploration approach that McCurdy describes is still controversial, the historical perspective on its disappointments and triumphs points to ways of developing "faster, better, and cheaper" as a management manifesto.

Tar
During the early 1990s NASA undertook a set of low-cost space science mission that became known as the "faster, better, cheaper" program. It was not really a program, of course, but more of a mantra, and Howard E. McCurdy's important study of the trend in the 1990s helps to explain what it was and what it was not. It emerged in the aftermath of the loss of the multi-billion dollar Mars Observer spacecraft in 1993, when NASA Administrator Daniel S. Goldin announced that he could no longer abide the building of "Battlestar Galactica" type space probes. NASA had to find a way to accomplish low-cost missions to the planets. McCurdy notes that one of the fundamental tenets of the program management concept was that three critical factors--cost, schedule, and reliability--were interrelated and had to be managed as a group. He also notes that managing for all three proved exceptionally difficult; if program managers held cost to a specific level, then one of the other two factors, or both of them to a somewhat lesser degree, would be adversely affected. The "faster, better, cheaper" concept tried to squeeze each of these issues--although many said you could successfully "pick two" to control rather than all three--but remarkably NASA project managers did so with some success.

McCurdy first identifies the missions that fell into the "faster, better, cheaper" model. These included: NEAR (Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous), Mars Pathfinder, Lunar Prospector, Stardust, Deep Space 1 and 2, Mars Global Surveyor, Mars Climate Orbiter, Mars Polar Lander, SAMPLEX, Fast Auroral Snapshot Explorer (FAST), Submillimeter Wave Astronomy Satellite (SWAS), Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE), Wide-Field Infrared Explorer (WIRE), and the Lewis and Clark probes. Out of these 16 missions, five failed to achieve their objectives. Two of the failures were spectacular--Mars Polar Lander and Mars Climate Orbiter in 1999--some were equally spectacular such as Mars Pathfinder in 1997 and Lunar Prospector in 1998. Others, such as Mars Global Surveyor, continue to deliver path-breaking scientific data.

After describing the missions and their outcomes, McCurdy then tallies the parameters that led to the success of these missions. These lessons learned included:

1. Use cohesive technical teams with authority to do the job.

2. Maintain visibility through reviews

3. Use a design-to-cost philosophy

4. Apply risk management techniques

5. Use experienced personnel

6. Establish good communication

7. Conduct better up-front planning

8. Have clear requirement definition

9. Use technology with an appropriate readiness level

This is a valuable study written for the project manager seeking to complete a successful high technology effort on schedule and on budget. It is an easy read and worthwhile for anyone seeking knowledge on how NASA has been able to accomplish its complex tasks. McCurdy undertook this study for the NASA History Division while I was Chief Historian, and the result helped to reshape the project management approach at the agency. I highly recommend "Faster, Better, Cheaper."
Asyasya
Pathfinder to Mars was the highlight of Faster, Better, Cheaper and Howard McCurdy's book provides an overview of the management there through effective comparisons. The book is instructive as to the management of high-tech space projects during NASA's Dan Goldin years. Nonetheless, it appears that management can achieve only two elements of the triade of FBC at any given time effectively. Pathfinder was a remarkable exception to the general rule.
Adoranin
This book examines in great detail why FBC was needed and what its impact was. McCurdy looks not only at the successes like Mars Pathfinder but also examines FBC's failures. His analysis helps highlight the pros and cons of FBC, an understanding that will help the reader understand NASA's space exploration program.
One of the most interesting parts in this book is the comparison of Pathfinder and Viking and the breakdown in costs associated with the two. It also explores the kinds of decisions that went into MPF to dispel the myth that Viking created in that space exploration required multi-billion dollar missions.
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