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Ace of the Iron Cross (Air combat classics) ePub download

by Ernst Udet

  • Author: Ernst Udet
  • ISBN: 0668051639
  • ISBN13: 978-0668051637
  • ePub: 1123 kb | FB2: 1539 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Engineering
  • Publisher: Arco Pub (1981)
  • Pages: 215
  • Rating: 4.3/5
  • Votes: 837
  • Format: azw docx lrf rtf
Ace of the Iron Cross (Air combat classics) ePub download

Ace of the Black Cross: The Memoirs of Ernst Udet

Ace of the Black Cross: The Memoirs of Ernst Udet. When the baby-faced 21 year-old Ace of Aces, wearing the Blue Max he has had a local jeweler make (the real one has not arrived yet) walks arm-in-arm with the famous Lo in front of the Royal Palace in Munich, he is surprised when the Guards snap to attention and salute him- she then makes him repeat the promenade.

Memoirs of German WW1 ace Ernst Udet. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read

Memoirs of German WW1 ace Ernst Udet. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Ace of the Iron Cross (Air Combat Classic Series) as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Ernst Udet, The Ace of the Iron Cross, e. Ace of the Iron Cross (Air combat classics).

Ernst Udet, The Ace of the Iron Cross, ed. Stanley M. Ulanoff, trans.

Iron Cross 1813-1939. I love to study who and why the Iron Cross was given. Strona poświęcona historii odznaczenia wojskowego nadawanego za męstwo na polu walki i sukcesy dowódcze. awesome pictures and information.

Born in 1896, Ernst Udet joined the infant German Air Service in 1915. Between the wars Udet became a stunt pilot. He went onto win the Iron Cross First Class and Pour le Merite. In 1939 he was put in charge of air force development and production, but on 17 November 1941, he killed himself.

Ace of the Iron Cross is a brand new translation of Ernst Udet's Mein Fliegerleben. It tells not only of his adventures in the First World War, including his breathtaking, dramatic battle with the legendary French hero, Georges Guynemer, but also of his experiences as an aircraft manufacturer, his racing and stunt flying in Argentina and the United States and his exciting interludes in Africa and the Artic.

The Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross (German: Ritterkreuz des Eisernen Kreuzes), or simply the Knight's Cross (Ritterkreuz), and its variants were the highest awards in the military and paramilitary forces of Nazi Germany during World War . .

The Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross (German: Ritterkreuz des Eisernen Kreuzes), or simply the Knight's Cross (Ritterkreuz), and its variants were the highest awards in the military and paramilitary forces of Nazi Germany during World War II. The Knight's Cross was awarded for a wide range of reasons and across all ranks, from a senior commander for skilled leadership of his troops in battle to a low-ranking soldier for a single act of military valour.

Udet joined the Imperial German Air Service at age 19, eventually . Ernst Udet - Second Highest German Ace of WWI". Retrieved 24 February 2012.

Udet joined the Imperial German Air Service at age 19, eventually becoming a notable flying ace of World War I, scoring 62 confirmed victories by the end of his life. A man, his arms and legs spread out like a frog's, falls past-the observer. At the moment, I don't think of them as human beings. Linge, Heinz Bis zum Untergang, p. 219. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n Browne, O'Brien (June 2006).

"Ace of the Iron Cross is a brand new translation of Ernst Udet's Mein Fliegerleben. It tells not only of his adventures in the First World War, including his breathtaking, dramatic battle with the legendary French hero, Georges Guynemer, but also of his experiences as an aircraft manufacturer, his racing and stunt flying in Argentina and the United States and his exciting interludes in Africa and the Artic."
Giamah
This is an excellent book for some understanding of Germany's WWI imperial flying service. Like most real vets Udet doesn't spend a lot of time on the combats he was in. If his text was all you had to go by, you'd hardly realize he over 60 kills. He didn't collect trophies of those his guns brought down like the infamous "Red Baron." We do get some glimpses of some of the most famous fliers in the dawn of combat aviation through the eyes of one who saw them personally. Then their were the challenging years between the wars when Udet would do just about anything to keep in the air. He went to such length so as to become known as "the Flying Fool." In the late 1930s he took up a young man who was to become a famous British test pilot. Remembering that ride in a film about his recollections, he described how Udet finished an amazing bout of aerobatic flying by bringing them down to the runway upside down only at the last minute flipping the aircraft upright for a smooth landing. The man was a true flyer.
One warning. The authorship of the last chapter is debatable. Actually, there is no debate in my mind. he did not write it. It is largely a diatribe extolling the virtues of Hitler and German National Socialism (Nazism). The whole book up to that point is practically devoid of politics though Udet does occasionally express frustration with restrictions on German aviation but then, he wanted to fly so that should not be unexpected. But about Hitler and the Nazis rise to power in the 30s? If he was devout, it would have been laced all through those chapters and it is not. No. Skip the last chapter or read it for a better grasp of the abuses of power and the history it represents. In any case, it is an excellent read. Even if your only read the part about WWI (about half the book maybe) it'll be worth the purchase price (if you bought a cheap copy like I did).
Mozel
I read this book at a time when I was reading everything I could get on WWI flight. Every memoir I've managed to read (minus Rene Fonck, who was either ghostwritten or a jerk)is written in such a personal way that you can forget which side the author was fighting on. This war in the air was the last gentleman's war, where your opponent was not a faceless evil but another man serving his country just as the author was serving his own. For a while, this was recognized and the courtesy extended even while you were trying to kill each other is very apparent in Udet's book.
Tracing his early training up through his after-war career as a pilot just trying to make ends meet and still outflying nearly everyone in the world, the book is written in a very accessible, personal and sometimes wonderfully poetic prose. The guy should have been a poet, not a warrior. He's painfully honest about his mistakes and some fairly dramatic errors, his fears, his doubts. He tells about his triumphs with no overt pride and his fascination and love of flying permeates everything; the overwhelming feeling you get out of this is that Udet was an amazingly talented pilot and also a sort of messed up but very likeable guy. From other accounts I've read, this is true. For Richthofen fanatics, there are brief mentions of the few times Udet interacted with the famed Ace personally and you can tell Udet held him in awe. A very personal, very honest and enjoyable memoir of the early days of flying from the view of one of history's finest pilots.
Gio
Hard to get into reading this book
White gold
Udet wrote his account with a straightforward yet highly descriptive style. Don't expect any dry verse or dull monotone. He captured all the emotions and thoughts that he must have experienced in a way that some novelist would be hard pressed to mimmick. It is interesting to read of his many achievement in war (second highest scoring German Ace) and then to read of his near failures after the war. In short, this book gives the story of a remarkable life that reads in such a way that it is truely hard to put down. You owe it to yourself to search for this book. Hopefully you will love it as much as I have.
Bynelad
Looks great, reminds me of my childhood. Me and my Brother would always check out the WWI aces and read them. This one is just a great classic.
Gugrel
The story is good but a cool of other books in short form half the pages are filled with back up data to me its junk
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