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Wagon Wheel Kitchens: Food on the Oregon Trail ePub download

by Jacqueline Williams

  • Author: Jacqueline Williams
  • ISBN: 0700606106
  • ISBN13: 978-0700606108
  • ePub: 1235 kb | FB2: 1393 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Regional & International
  • Publisher: University Press of Kansas; First Edition edition (August 27, 1993)
  • Pages: 248
  • Rating: 4.5/5
  • Votes: 978
  • Format: mobi txt rtf docx
Wagon Wheel Kitchens: Food on the Oregon Trail ePub download

This lively book puts the reader squarely on the Oregon Trail-baking bread in a Dutch oven over a campfire, searing . Wagon Wheel Kitchens can be considered a classic now, one of the best books on eating and cooking on the Oregon Trail

This lively book puts the reader squarely on the Oregon Trail-baking bread in a Dutch oven over a campfire, searing buffalo meat, and trading for fresh vegetables and fish. Through emigrant guides, diaries, and 'receipts' of the day, Williams reconstructs the meals that succored emigrants as they crossed the Plains. Wagon Wheel Kitchens can be considered a classic now, one of the best books on eating and cooking on the Oregon Trail.

Wagon Wheel Kitchens book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Wagon Wheel Kitchens: Food on the Oregon Trail as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Book Format: Choose an option. Using travelers' diaries, letters, newspaper advertisements, and nineteenth-century cookbooks, Williams re-creates the highs and lows of cooking and eating on the Oregon Trail. She investigates the mundane-biscuits and bacon, mush and coffee-as well as the d soda made from bubbling spring water; ice cream created from milk, snow, and peppermint; fresh fruits and vegetables.

Wagon wheel kitchens. by. Jacqueline B. Williams. Cookery - Oregon National Historic Trail - History, Frontier and pioneer life - Oregon National Historic Trail. University Press of Kansas. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china. Kahle/Austin Foundation.

Jacqueline Williams This book is a large collection of her nicely polished gold nuggets of historical archaeology. It’s a gift to us all.

Award of Excellence from the Washington Museum Association. Pioneer temperaments, Jacqueline Williams shows, were greatly influenced by that which was stewable, bakable, broilable, and boilable. This lively book puts the reader squarely on the Oregon Trail-baking bread in a Dutch oven over a campfire, searing buffalo meat, and trading for fresh vegetables and fish. Through emigrant guides, diaries, and ‘receipts’ of the day, Williams reconstructs the meals that succored emigrants as they crossed the Plains. This book is a large collection of her nicely polished gold nuggets of historical archaeology.

cookbooks, Williams re-creates the highs and lows of cooking and eating on the Oregon Trail.

book by Jacqueline B.

Wagon Wheel Kitchens: Food on the Oregon Trail, Jacqueline Williams --provisions, cooking methods, and diary excerpts. Excellent bibliography. Camp fare was similar to what the pioneers ate on the Oregon trail: belly-filling foods made with local ingredients (freshly shot game, fruits & vegetables) and store-bought provisions (coffee, beans & bacon). As time progressed, so did the food. Sourdough bread was a staple of the forty-niners.

by Jacqueline Williams. Overland Journal - Volume 11, No. 2 - 1993. Her book, Wagon Wheel Kitchens: Food on the Oregon Trail, has been described by Glenda Riley as a "lively book puts the reader squarely on the Oregon trail - baking break in a dutch oven over a campfire, searing buffalo meat, and trading for fresh vegetables and fish. Through emigrant guides, diaries and 'receipts' of the day, Williams constructs the meals that succored emigrants as they crossed the Plains.

The Oregon Trail was the 2000 mile overland route by which people walked for six months from the Midwest to Oregon and the northern West Coast . Williams, Jacqueline. Wagon Wheel Kitchens: Food on the Oregon Trail. 222 pp. Primary sources.

The Oregon Trail was the 2000 mile overland route by which people walked for six months from the Midwest to Oregon and the northern West Coast before the railroad opened in 1869. It was one of the great routes used to open the American frontier-people wanted the cheap rich farmlands, as well as the adventure and the self-determination involved in creating new communities.

The Oregon Trail is a 2,170-mile (3,490 km) historic East–West, large-wheeled wagon route and emigrant trail in the United States that connected the Missouri River to valleys in Oregon. The eastern part of the Oregon Trail spanned part of the future. The eastern part of the Oregon Trail spanned part of the future state of Kansas, and nearly all of what are now the states of Nebraska and Wyoming. The western half of the trail spanned most of the future states of Idaho and Oregon.

Pioneer temperaments, Jacqueline Williams shows, were greatly influenced by that which was stewable, bakable, broilable, and boilable. Using travelers' diaries, letters, newspaper advertisements, and nineteenth-century cookbooks, Williams re-creates the highs and lows of cooking and eating on the Oregon Trail. She investigates the mundane—biscuits and bacon, mush and coffee—as well as the unexpected—carbonated soda made from bubbling spring water; ice cream created from milk, snow, and peppermint; fresh fruits and vegetables. Understanding what and how the pioneers ate, Williams demonstrates, is essential to understanding how they lived and survived—and sometimes died—on the trail. "This book holds an encyclopedia of information culled from diaries and contemporary newspapers. I can't think of a more intimate account of the lives of the overlanders, how they turned their rude wagons into homes, how they made meals both a comfort and a celebration. Some readers will want to try out recipes; others will read in awe as in the midst of difficult travel, women made certain their families marked the Fourth of July with cakes—fruit jelly and sponge-puddings, and ice cream—and clean underwear!"—Lillian Schlissel, author of Women's Diaries of the Westward Journey and Western Women: Their Lands, Their Lives
Jerdodov
Any reader who loves western and frontier reading will be delighted with this historically accurate book. It includes a few good photos of old cookware and talks about stocking up, medicinals, and how they cooked. For researchers, it is a must-have!
Kelezel
This book dwells on the stocking up of wagon trains. Dried foods, Cured meats, and staples that can be easily rationed until the next supply center.
While there ARE certainly some recipes, they are interspersed with the narrative, and not separately cataloged. So if you are looking for a specific recipe, you will be unlikely to find it. But, if you stumble across one, they are often very tasty, and fun to try on your friends.
It is a nice historic prairie kitchen account.
EXIBUZYW
I'm researching food that was prepared and eaten on wagon trains. Perfect for finding out about the kinds of ingredients, cooking utensils, recipes, stories, and more. I really admire those pioneer women. Wow!
Andromajurus
Finally, the book I've been looking for in researching the Oregon Trail, WAGON WHEEL KITCHENS is a detailed description of food acquistion and preparation on the Oregon Trail. It was also an interesting book to read.
Jerinovir
Wagon Wheel Kitchens can be considered a classic now, one of the best books on eating and cooking on the Oregon Trail. It's not just recounting of the trials and tribulations of gathering and carrying foodstuffs for the months-long travel, but the new science and technology that made going on the Oregon Trail possible. The very basics that we take for granted today such a flour, are all explored. I found the nascent food science such as Preston's yeast flour and the fight over ingredients that made a simple loaf of bread rise all interesting and thought-provoking. What on earth would people do today when many can't even make a simple roux?

Highly recommended not only for someone interested in the Oregon Trail, but also for putting family history into context. Any teacher studying this period in the classroom or college level would benefit from reading it for himself or assigning it.
Weernis
Good read for those interested in how their ancestors ate -- especially if it is known one of them was among those who went west using this paticular route. Highly recommended.
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