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The Indian Spice Kitchen ePub download

by Monisha Bharadwaj

  • Author: Monisha Bharadwaj
  • ISBN: 0781808014
  • ISBN13: 978-0781808019
  • ePub: 1876 kb | FB2: 1640 kb
  • Language: English
  • Category: Regional & International
  • Publisher: Hippocrene Books (February 1, 2000)
  • Pages: 240
  • Rating: 4.3/5
  • Votes: 652
  • Format: lit lrf docx doc
The Indian Spice Kitchen ePub download

Indian Spice Kitchen' by Monisha Bharadwaj is an earnest, ethnic, informative coverage of. .Possibly my only disappointment from this book is that unlike the spice mixes, there was no chapter dedicated to chutney recipes.

Indian Spice Kitchen' by Monisha Bharadwaj is an earnest, ethnic, informative coverage of Indian spice ingredients, mixes, herbs, fruits and vegetables, nuts, dals and pulses, cereals and flours, and miscellaneous ingredients. While the advocates of most cuisines, especially the Italian, French, Chinese, and Japanese rhapsodize about how important food is to their respective cultures, the Indian culture outdoes all of the others with the depth to which religion and culture affects the food mores of the Indian subcontinent.

This item:Indian Cookery Course by MONISHA BHARADWAJ Hardcover . This is probably one of my most wish listed book about Indian Cuisine.

In stock on January 5, 2020. I have a Indian store by me and was able to find all the ingredients in the book. 25 people found this helpful.

Wonderful resource for overall Indian cooking-a 'dictionary' or indian spices and ingredients-with relevant . It is actually written by someone completely different: Minisha Bharadwaj.

Wonderful resource for overall Indian cooking-a 'dictionary' or indian spices and ingredients-with relevant recipes throughout.

Indian Spice Kitchen book. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Indian Spice Kitchen. by. Monisha Bharadwaj. The Indian Spice Kitchen is an indispensable guide to Indian cuisine.

Indian cuisine is a swirl of textures and flavors, mysteriously fiery yet beautifully subtle

Indian cuisine is a swirl of textures and flavors, mysteriously fiery yet beautifully subtle. This richly produced, wonderfully readable cookbook, The Indian Spice Kitchen, written by the food consultant to the celebrated London restaurant, Bombay Brasserie, takes you on an unforgettable culinary journey along the spice routes of India with over 200 authentic recipes and stunning color photographs throughout.

The Indian Spice Kitchen: Essential Ingredients and Over 200 Authentic Recipes. Bharadwaj, Monisha (2005). The Indian Spice Kitchen (Illustrated e. Hippocrene Books, Incorporated. p. 51. ISBN 978-0-7818-1143-9. Rice Bowl: Vegetarian Rice Recipes from India and the World. 167. ISBN 0-7818-1143-0. Retrieved 2009-03-03.

Электронная книга "Indian Cookery Course", Monisha Bharadwaj. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Indian Cookery Course" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

This is a beautiful book filled with useful and mouth-watering photographs. The Indian Spice Kitchen: Monisha Bharadwaj (hardcover). Each ‘spice’ has a description of how it grows, what it looks and tastes like, and how it is used, and then a few recipes using that spice as the primary flavoring.

From asafoetida to walnuts, each of 100 ingredients is explored giving useful advice about its appearance and taste, how it grows, how to store it and, of course, its culinary uses, complemented with over 200 classic Indian dishes. Every ingredient is a vivid insight into India's great and colourful traditions, from the earthy, creamy lentil dishes and yogurt-based marinades in North Indian cooking to the rice, coconut and curry leaves that are the famous staples of the South.

Author Monisha Bharadwaj runs an Indian cooking school in London

Author Monisha Bharadwaj runs an Indian cooking school in London. Just as you'd expect, The Indian Cooking Course has recipes for rice, dals, vegetables, meats, chutneys, flatbreads, vindaloos, kormas and samosas. But it's not just recipes; the reference material goes wide and deep, from colorful street shots and essays on regional foodways to step-by-step demo photos and instructions. Here's a cookbook for the person who wants to cook but can barely boil water, who enters the kitchen only with caution and despite dire predictions of disaster by family and friends. Kim Upton is coming to the rescue with.

Presenting more than two hundred authentic Indian recipes, an illustrated cookbook explains how to use a wide range of herbs, nuts, spices, vinegars, and other special ingredients to create distinctive Indian dishes, including soups, breads, vegetable and meat dishes, desserts, and beverages. 25,000 first printing."
Jerdodov
`The Indian Spice Kitchen' by Monisha Bharadwaj is an earnest, ethnic, informative coverage of Indian spice ingredients, mixes, herbs, fruits and vegetables, nuts, dals and pulses, cereals and flours, and miscellaneous ingredients. While the advocates of most cuisines, especially the Italian, French, Chinese, and Japanese rhapsodize about how important food is to their respective cultures, the Indian culture outdoes all of the others with the depth to which religion and culture affects the food mores of the Indian subcontinent. In fact, if I am to believe this author, food choices are even more important to the Hindu than it is to followers of Jewish holiday and kosher traditions. The best known and deepest strictures are those which encourage vegetarianism, based on the Hindu doctrine of reincarnation, where it is believed that animals contain souls of past or future humans. In addition to this doctrine, there are associations of particular foods with various Hindu deities, such as the devotion of Lord Krishna with milk, butter, and yogurt. These traditions are not unlike the associations of the ancient Greeks who, for example, linked Athena with olives. On top of the religious connections, there is the Ayurvedic system of nutrition that has the weight of both religion and `science'.

I have reviewed many books on Asian ingredients covering Japan, China, and Southeast Asia, including the Philippines, Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, and Burma, but virtually none of them include specifically India. Even Bruce Cost's classic `Asian Ingredients' stops at the border between Thailand and Bangla Desh. Therefore, this book is a great addition to a culinary library that aims to cover the world.

While the book is not quite as detailed as Cost's book on linguistic and scientific matters, this volume does include the very important scientific names of plants which yield the herbs, spices, vegetables, fruits, grains, legumes, and other products featured in the book. This may not seem like much to the casual reader until they try to match up European and Indian ingredients. The very first item, dill, it turns out, has both a European and an Asian species. Fortunately, unlike basil, the differences between European and Indian dill are small, so one can easily be substituted for the other. The scientific name is essential when comparing items in this book to similar books on Western produce.

Each section devoted to a particular plant has the following items:

How it Grows: geographical distribution, size, harvesting, and whether it is an annual, biennial or perennial

Appearance and Taste: Weight, aroma, and important components

Buying and Storing: How and what to select and how to store in the pantry.

Medicinal and Other Uses: Folk remedies and non-culinary uses. It is probably worth warning the reader at this point that the virtues attributed to many of these herbs are probably as much due to a placebo effect as to any genuine pharmacological efficacy. I suggest you do not take these suggestions at face value and only rely on suggestions that are corroborated from a more scientifically oriented source.

Culinary Uses: What kinds of recipes use these ingredients.

Each section also offers one or more recipes in which the highlighted ingredient is used. Each recipe is introduced with a brief headnote on the recipe's source region. Each section also has at least one or more good photographs of the product.

By far the most useful chapter of this book is the second that deals with the famous Indian spice mixes. There are many more named combinations than the simple `curry powder' rubric. There is garam masala from Northern India, Sambhar powder from Tamil Nadu, Goda Masala from Bombay, tandoori masala from the Punjab, panch phoron from Bengal and Kholombo powder from the southwestern coast. Aside from its regional specialities, each mixture has a speciality. Few of these mixtures are `hot' in the way chili powder is hot from dried capsicum.

The first item which gave me the sense that this was a useful and accurate source of information was when I saw the treatment of cinnamon and cassia as two different spices, in spite of the fact that practically everything labeled cinnamon in the United States is actually ground cassia.

Next to the spice mixes, the most interesting chapter is the last, dealing with miscellaneous products. While I know little in detail about Indian cuisine, I was surprised at the number of items I found where of which I had never heard. Among these are the little crackers named appadams, sago, a starch similar to tapioca made from tree sap and subja seeds from a plant in the basil family. I was also surprised to find edible silver foil. This was a surprise not because I had not heard of it before, but because there was no section on edible gold foil, as gold has an enormous role in Indian culture.

Possibly my only disappointment from this book is that unlike the spice mixes, there was no chapter dedicated to chutney recipes. There are several in the book, but they are distributed across sections for various different ingredients.

As this is the very first book on Indian cuisine I have reviewed, I recommend it with the caveat that while I am sure this is better than many, there may be others that are as good or better. But, this is an attractive, high quality trade paperback that is worth the money if you are really interested in Indian ingredients.
SmEsH
Great book w/in depth info on herbs/spices, medicinal uses of them & also some history and/or other info about foods & the different foods for different regions in India. I'm familiar w/Ayurvedic medicine so it was nice to have info about the herbs/spices & combining/use of various foods. I truly cannot say enough good things about this book.
Doulkree
The Indian Spice Kitchen is a good reference book for learning about the spices that are common in Indian cooking. The information is classified by spice or ingredient type. Each spice is given a two-page spread in which information is given about the taste, appearance, source, history, and cultural signifigance of the spice. Also two recipies are given which use the spice mentioned. The recipies are nice, but I think that the main function of this book is to introduce the spices common in the Indian kitchen. The book is filled with full-color pictures throughout, and it will please any serious foodlover. If you already know a lot about the spices used in Indian cooking and are more interested in recipies, perhaps you should look for a more focused cookbook. For beginners to Indian cooking, this is a perfect introduction.
The Sinners from Mitar
Beautiful pictures with an informative text. This book is a joy to read, and a useful guide to spices and herbs. The book makes me want to cook. I bought our copy years ago, but had to buy another copy for our daughter because she is setting up her kitchen. A necessity for people who like to experiment.
Gaeuney
GREAT cookbook and love to of info on spices that really help flavor up your recipes!
Steamy Ibis
If you are just looking for recipes, don't bother with this book. This FANTASTIC publication is geared toward the serious 'cuisine-o-phile', who loves to read about food, not just eat it. I have at least a hundred books about food and this is a gem. It gives a few pages on dozens of spices, rice types, pulses, and other basics of Indian cooking and provides interesting information on each along with a couple of example recipes. Well worth the very reasonable price.
Gholbirius
I love this book! It's a great reference for information about Indian cooking ingredients, many of which are unfamiliar to me, along with recipes which represent their use. I find this a fascinating book to browse, with beautiful graphics. It's also a great reference, if I can figure out what section in which to look. If only it had an index!
Looks like s nice cookbook. I've only had time too look through it. My mom has used her copy and liked the recipe she made
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